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Celebrating the Day of Valor in the Philippines

Celebrating the Day of Valor in the Philippines

The Day of Valor holiday in the Philippines, called Araw ng Kagitingan in Filipino, is a day of both celebration and mourning. On the one hand, it honors the courage of Filipino soldiers in World War 2, and on the other, it commemorates those who lost their lives in the Bataan Death March.

In this article, you’ll learn about the history behind the Day of Valor, look at how Pinoys mark this day, and gain some relevant Filipino vocabulary.

Let’s get started!

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1. What is Day of Valor in the Philippines?

In the Philippines, the Day of Valor is a public holiday for honoring the bravery, or katapangan, of Filipino and American soldiers during the Second World War. In particular, it commemorates one of the most horrendous things to happen in the Philippines in World War 2: The Bataan Death March.

What was the Bataan Death March?

A Bataan Death March Memorial

Leading up to the Bataan Death March, the Japanese had been able to occupy the Philippines. At the time, many of the Filipino and American soldiers were injured or ill, and so the American Major General Edward P. King decided to sumuko, or surrender, his forces. This took place on April 9, 1942.

Upon this surrender, the Japanese began marching King’s soldiers toward Camp O’Donnell, which was approximately ninety miles away in San Fernando. Many soldiers died during this march.

But all was not lost.

King’s surrender and the subsequent march acted as a diversion, allowing the Filipino and American soldiers’ allies more time to get ready for future battles. In the end, this allowed for major victories and turning points for the Filipinos and Americans, such as the Battle of Midway.

In 1945, the Bataan peninsula was once again liberated by the Filipino and American troops.

    → Check out our vocabulary list for another popular Filipino hero: Jose Rizal.

2. When is the Day of Valor Holiday?

One Soldier Rescuing Another

Each year, the Day of Valor is celebrated on April 9. However, if Easter happens to fall on the same date, they may celebrate on a nearby date instead.

3. Traditions and Celebrations for the Day of Valor

A Military Marching Together

The Day of Valor holiday revolves around honoring and celebrating the pagkabayani, or heroism, of the World War 2 soldiers, and mourns the loss of those who died.

On the Day of Valor, Philippines’ veterans from the Second World War parade through the streets of various cities, and the President gives a speech at the Mt. Samat Shrine. This shrine is located in the Bataan province in order to commemorate those who gave their all in digmaan, or war.

While most businesses are closed during the Day of Valor, you may find a few places still open. Because the Day of Valor is usually part of a long weekend, many Filipino families like to spend time together, usually out doing things.

4. Day of Valor Over the Years

Filipinos officially started celebrating the Day of Valor in 1961, but this holiday has had quite a few revisions since then. Perhaps most notably, its name has changed three times!

In 1961, this holiday was called Bataan Day. In 1987, this changed to Araw ng Kagitingan (Bataan and Corregidor Day). Finally, in 2010, it came to be called only Araw ng Kagitingan.

In the U.S. state of Illinois, there’s also a celebration for this holiday (called Bataan Day here). This is because some of the troops serving in the Bataan province were from the Illinois National Guard.

5. Essential Filipino Vocabulary for the Day of Valor

A Cat Standing in Front of a Lion Shadow

Ready to review some of the vocabulary words from this article? Here’s a list of the most important vocabulary for the Day of Valor in the Philippines!

  • Martsa ng Kamatayan — “Death march”
  • Katapangan — “Bravery”
  • Digmaan — “War”
  • Pagbagsak ng Bataan — “Fall of Bataan”
  • Ikalawang Digmaang Pandaigdig — “Second World War”
  • Sumuko — “Surrender”
  • Magiting — “Valiant”
  • Depensahan — “Defend”
  • Pagkabayani — “Heroism”
  • Ipaglaban ang — “Fight for”
  • Pagkubkob — “Siege”
  • Puwersang militar — “Military force”

To hear the pronunciation of each word, and to read them alongside relevant images, be sure to check out our Filipino Day of Valor vocabulary list!

Final Thoughts

We hope you enjoyed learning about the Day of Valor holiday with us, and that you took away some valuable cultural information.

Is there a holiday in your country to honor national heroes or the military? Let us know about it in the comments!

If you want to learn even more about Filipino culture, visit the following pages on FilipinoPod101.com:

Still want more? Create your free lifetime account today, and start learning with us. FilipinoPod101.com has tons of fun lessons for learners at every level, so there’s something for everyone.

We look forward to having you!

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How to Celebrate the Filipino-Chinese New Year

Considering the history between China and the Philippines, it should come as no surprise that the popular Chinese New Year holiday would find a place among the Filipinos. The Filipino Chinese New Year traditions reflect traditional Chinese culture with a modern Filipino flare.

In this article, you’ll learn all about the Philippines during Chinese New Year, the most popular Chinese New Year foods, and some of the history involved in the integration of this holiday into Filipino culture.

At FilipinoPod101.com, it’s our aim to make every aspect of your language-learning journey both fun and informative, starting with this article! Ready to delve into this fascinating holiday? Let’s get started.

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1. What is the Chinese New Year?

Because of the large number of Chinese people living in the country, the Chinese New Year was declared an official holiday in 2011. Looking back at history, the Filipinos had been trading with the Chinese even before the arrival of the Spanish.

The Spanish placed the Chinese in an area in Manila called Binondo. Commerce is very lively in Binondo, where Chinese and Chinese-Filipinos own a lot of businesses. It’s also the center of festivities during the Chinese New Year, and the oldest Chinatown in the world, established in 1594. Binondo means binondoc or binundok, translating to “mountainous” in English, referring to the hilly area of Binondo.

The Philippines’ Lunar New Year celebration is led by the Chinese and Filipino-Chinese living in the country. It’s celebrated because of the unique festivities, food, and beliefs that accompany this tradition. In the Filipino language, the Chinese New Year could be called a katangi-tanging selebrasyon, or “one-of-a-kind celebration!”

2. Chinese New Year Dates

Flowers and Red Packet for Chinese New Year

The Chinese New Year follows the lunar calendar, meaning that its date on the Gregorian calendar varies from year to year. For your convenience, here’s a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years.

  • 2020: January 25
  • 2021: February 12
  • 2022: February 1
  • 2023: January 22
  • 2024: February 10
  • 2025: January 29
  • 2026: February 17
  • 2027: February 6
  • 2028: January 26
  • 2029: February 13

3. Lunar New Year Celebrations in the Philippines

Chinese New Year Dragon Dance

In the Philippines, Chinese New Year traditions always include lots of good food, and even people who don’t celebrate the holiday look forward to the dishes they can expect during the festivities. The most popular of these Filipino Chinese New Year foods is the “Chinese New Year’s cake,” made of glutinous rice, called the tikoy in Filipino. A variety of types and flavors that suit both Filipino and Chinese tastes have become popular, including pandan and ube (purple yam). The tikoy symbolizes how family members stay bonded together. Because the tikoy is sticky, it’s said that having this every Chinese New Year will make a family’s bonds “stickier.”

Red is considered the luckiest color, and a lot of people wear red on this day. Older people give money-filled “red envelopes,” called ang pao, to children.

Each year, the Chinese and Chinese-Filipinos take part in or watch the dragon dance, lion dance, and paputok, or “fireworks.” It’s said that the lion and dragon dances will bring good luck to one’s business or family. People also believe that a longer dragon will bring more good luck.

4. Common New Year Greetings

There are two main holiday greetings that Pinoys say to each other on the Chinese New Year. Do you know what they are?

The first and most common is the Cantonese greeting Kung Hei Fat Choi, meaning “Happy New Year.” The second is Kiong Hee Huat Tsai, which means “Congratulations” and “Be prosperous.”

5. Must-Know Vocabulary

Pancit, a Traditional Chinese Dish Adopted by Filipinos

Ready to review some of the vocabulary words we covered in this article? Here are the essential vocabulary words you should know for the Chinese New Year in the Philippines!

  • Hopia — “Bakpia
  • Siomai — “Shumai
  • Kung Hei Fat Choi — “Happy New Year”
  • Lumpia — “Lumpia”
  • Paputok — “Firework”
  • Dragon dance — “Dragon dance”
  • Ang pao — “Red envelope”
  • Pancit — “Pancit”
  • Tikoy — “Chinese New Year’s cake”
  • Lunar New Year — “Lunar New Year”

To hear each of these vocabulary words pronounced, and to read them alongside relevant images, be sure to check out our Filipino Lunar New Year vocabulary list!

Final Thoughts

We hope you enjoyed learning about the Filipino Lunar New Year with us! How do you celebrate the new year in your country? Let us know in the comments!

If you’re interested in learning even more about Filipino culture and the language, you may find the following pages useful:

Learning Filipino doesn’t need to be boring or overwhelming—with FilipinoPod101.com, it can even be fun! With countless lessons for beginners, intermediate learners, and advanced students, there’s something for everyone.

If you’re serious about mastering the language, create your free lifetime account today.

Happy Filipino learning! :)

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The Filipino Calendar: Talking About Dates in Filipino

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Did you know there are many different types of calendars?

As you probably know - a calendar is a system of organizing days in weeks and months for specific purposes, according to Wikipedia.

Worldwide, most countries use the Gregorian calendar. Some just work on the same framework, meaning that time is divided into units based on the earth’s movement around the sun - the “solar calendar”. Other calendars keep time by observing the moon’s movements, a combination of the moon and the sun’s movements, and seasons.

Through FilipinoPod101, you can learn all about this and so much more! Our themed, culturally relevant lessons are skillfully designed so you can do your planning perfectly for a holiday or a date.

Having a good plan for a visit or a trip is like studying well for an exam. You’re just so much better prepared! For that, you could well need specific phrases to plan around appointments and such, especially on business trips. Make sure to use the charts we provide here with the days of the week in Filipino, as well as the months in Filipino to navigate your way as you plan. Great resources!

Also - always remember to have fun!

Table of Contents

  1. Why Will It Help To Know How To Talk About Dates in Filipino?
  2. Talking About your Plans
  3. Can FilipinoPod101 Help You In Other Ways Too?

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1. Why Will It Help To Know How To Talk About Dates in Filipino?

Days of the Week

Well, that’s not a difficult question to answer. No matter why you’re travelling, it would be best to at least know the names of days and months in Filipino. You don’t want to miss your flight or an appointment because you confused “Biyernes” (Friday) with “Sabado” (Saturday)! Or maybe you planned a holiday for “Hulyo” (July), but you booked a flight for “Hunyo” (June) by accident!

Avoid this confusion by learning the Filipino calendar before you leave.

Now, as promised, the 15 phrases to help you make and discuss plans.


2. Talking About your Plans

Months of the Year

Perhaps you’re working in Philippines, or maybe you’re enjoying a prolonged holiday. Fabulous! Memorize these phrases so you can be sure to successfully negotiate meetings, appointments, dates, events, the list goes on!

1. Anon bang gagawin mo sa Sabado at Linggo?

“What are you doing this weekend?”

This question is usually a preamble to inviting someone somewhere. Given that it’s over the weekend, it probably means a casual get-together or another social event. (But not necessarily! A manager or boss could also ask this for entirely different reasons.)

It’s a handy phrase to know when you’ve made Filipino or expat friends in the country. Or, be the one doing the inviting. Then train your ear to learn the following phrases so you can understand the response.

2. Maglalakbay ako ngayong katapusan ng linggo.

“I am traveling this weekend.”

This could be a reply if you’re not available because you’re doing other fun stuff.

No matter why you are visiting Philippines, do take the time to explore the country! It’s beautiful and it has so many wonderful, interesting spots ready to be visited.

Couple at booking in Desk

3. Nagpaplano akong manatili sa bahay.

“I am planning to stay at home.”

Maybe you feel unwell, but don’t want to give too much information? Or maybe you have work to do? Perhaps you just need some quiet gardening time…it doesn’t matter. This response is polite and honest without oversharing.

It could also be a slightly open-ended response, depending on how you deliver it. Because hey, being home could still mean your plans are flexible, right?

That said - depending on your relationship with the inviter, nuances like these will probably not be so apparent in a foreign culture. So, best to use this excuse for declining an invitation only if you are truly set on staying in.

Woman Doing Gardening

4. Abala ako ngayong linggo.

“This week I am busy.”

Another polite phrase that gives a reason for declining an invitation but without oversharing details.

Don’t decline too many invitations, though! You don’t want people to think that you’re too busy to hang out with them. They will stop inviting you out, and you know how the saying goes - all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy…! Being social is good for the soul.

5. Libre ako bukas.

“I am free tomorrow.”

Yay! Perhaps you were approached by that person and they asked about your availability for a date. This would be a fine reply. Not too eager, but still indicating that you’re interested.

Or maybe you’re just replying to a colleague or manager’s request for a meeting. Polite, honest and clear.

Alternatively, you’re just busy right now, and plans are not going the way they were…well, planned. Compromise is a lovely thing! And this phrase sounds just like that.

Use it to indicate that you want to accommodate an invitation or the inviter’s plans, despite your current unavailability. Only if you are really free, of course.

6. Maaari ba nating i-reschedule ito?

“Can we reschedule this?”

So, life happened and you are unable to meet obligations or attend a planned meeting. This is a suitable question to ask if you wish to indicate your willingness to still engage with whatever is on the table.

Obviously you should (ideally) not ask to reschedule a party or big meeting! (Unless you’re the boss or it’s your own party, of course.) But if there’s reasonable wiggle room regarding arrangements, then this one’s your question.

Business Man Sitting with Schedule

7. Magkakaroon ako nang sapat na oras pagtatapos ng buwan.

“I will have enough time at the end of the month.”

A go-to phrase when events or activities are likely to take up a lot of your time, such as going away for a weekend, spending the day at a local market, or writing your manager’s quarterly report (with 20 flow-charts in Powerpoint) - anything that won’t only take an hour or two.

8. Kailan ang pinakamagandang oras na nababagay sayo?

“When is the best time that suits you?”

Remember phrase #5? That was a possible reply to this question. Asked by your crush, very possibly! Or, it could be asked by any other person for any other reason, doesn’t matter.

If this is addressed to you, it usually means that the person respects your time and schedule, which is a good thing. It probably also means that their own schedule is flexible, another good thing.

This is also a polite question to ask when a manager or senior colleague wants to meet with you. Let them decide on the time, and be as accommodating as possible. This attitude shows respect for seniority - good for career building. (Within reason, of course. You don’t need to postpone your wedding or your paid-up holiday to Australia because your manager wants to see you.)

Screen Tablet Hotel

9. Ayos lang ba ang petsa na ito sayo?

“Is this date OK with you?”

But - if the other party insists that you choose a time for a meeting, appointment, or date etc., then do so! Respond with this nice, somewhat casual question that leaves space for negotiation, but only needs a simple reply.

Suitable for friends, and casual acquaintances and colleagues.

10. Libre ka ba sa araw na iyon?

“Are you available on that day?”

This is the a-bit-more-formal version of the previous question. Again, it has room for negotiation, but only needs a simple response - nice and neat!

Maybe this is the go-to question when you’re addressing your seniors at work, or a person much older than you.

11. Maaari ba nating gawin ito sa lalong madaling panahon?

“Can we do it as soon as possible?”

This question has an urgency to it that should preferably be responded to with the same. A simple reply will be good - yes or no. Less negotiable, this is still polite because it’s a question that gives you a choice.

But stand ready with one of the phrases in this article to help tie down a time and date!

Couple Getting Engaged on a Bridge

12. Libre ako tuwing gabi.

“I’m available every evening”

If you’re going to reply with this phrase, context is everything.

- If it’s your manager asking you to put in a bit of overtime, and you are available to - great reply! When deadlines are tight and everybody is stressing, your willingness to go the extra mile can only improve your relationship with your boss.

(Still, no need to be a doormat! If you get asked to work overtime too often, or if everyone else is goofing around while you have to graft, then re-evaluate the situation. And if you feel you’re being exploited a bit, don’t stress! Equip yourself with the diplomatic, yet assertive responses right in this article.)

- If it’s an old friend or longtime significant other asking to hang out - good reply. You know one another and appearances don’t matter any longer.

- If it’s a new crush who just asked when you’d be available for a date - stop. Not such a great reply. Tone down a bit! “Interested but not overly eager” is what you’re going for here.

Refer back to response #5, or use a counter-question, such as #1. Whatever suits you.

But if they - or anyone else - invite you to scale the Himalayas with them, then the next phrase will probably be the only sane response!

Mountaineer in Snow

13. Kailangan kong planuhin ito nang maaga.

“I need to plan this well in advance.”

So, as said under #9, perhaps you’re invited to join someone conquer the Himalayas.

Or your company manager wants you to plan the Party that Tops All Year-End Parties Forever.

Simply - if you get asked to do something that you know will need a lot of thorough planning, this is a good phrase to respond with.

It’s an assertive phrase that demonstrates two things regarding your attitude:

a) That you know your own abilities, and respect your own schedule.
b) That your respect other people’s time and schedule too.

Then just be sure to actually do that planning well in advance!

14. Kailangan nating humanap ng iba pang petsa.

“We need to find another date.”

So, you’re in negotiations regarding a date.

This is an assertive statement that should probably not be used with a “My way or the highway” attitude.

That stuff only works in the movies - think sharp-tongued Samuel L. Jackson. Or fierce Kristen Stewart. Yea, they can be scary, so tone down that tone.

Also, be mindful that fickle people who change plans all the time don’t keep friends! Taking others’ needs into consideration, while simultaneously having your way is a delicate art that takes proper cultivation. Use this phrase sparingly - we have better ones here to negotiate with.

Rock Concert Hands in the Air

Of course, if your planned trip to the dentist falls on the same day as the only Billie Eilish concert close by…well, priorities are priorities. Feel free to call the dentist with this phrase. Or even better, use the next one.

15. Hindi ko yan magagawa sa araw na iyon.

“I cannot do it on that day.”

This is the low-key-but-still-firm cousin of the previous phrase. You’re stating a personal fact, and depending on your tone, this can be as non-negotiable as you prefer.

Again, only use this when you really mean it, if you’re visiting Philippines or any other foreign country.

So, that’s it, folks! Which phrase did you find the most helpful? Let us know in the comments!


3. Can FilipinoPod101 Help You In Other Ways Too?

Numbers

Well yes, of course!

We think you will find these phrases easy to use when talking about dates and months in Filipino. But knowing how to employ them properly could help you avoid sticky situations!

FilipinoPod101 is uniquely geared to help you with this and so much more.

This InnovativeLanguage.com initiative is one of many online language-learning courses. With us, you’ll find it easy and fun to learn a new language, and here are a few reasons why:

  • Immediately upon enrollment, you’ll receive hundreds of well-designed lessons to get you going.
  • Watch superb recordings of native Filipino speakers in cool slide-shows - the easy way to practice till you sound just like a native speaker yourself!
  • Also immediately upon enrollment, you’ll get access to a huge library of free resources! These include extensive, theme-based Vocabulary Lists and a Word of the Day List (For free, hot bargains!) These alone are sure to give your vocab-learning boxing gloves.
  • You’ll also immediately be able to use an excellent and free Filipino online dictionary. Necessary for quick, handy translations, no matter where you find yourself.
  • For the serious learner, there are numerous enrollment upgrades available, one of which offers you a personal, online Filipino host. Allow us to hold your hand and support you in your learning!

If you’re serious about mastering Filipino easily yet correctly, FilipinoPod101 is definitely one of, if not the best, online language learning platforms available. Talking about your plans or dates in Filipino need not ever spoil your stay.

So, hurry up—enroll today!

Learn How to Talk About Your Family in Filipino

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Did you know that only some reptiles and birds don’t parent their offspring? Except for crocodiles, all reptiles (and one family of bird species called megapodes) hatch from eggs and grow up alone, without any family.

The rest of us need family if we are to survive and thrive - humans and animals alike!

At FilipinoPod101, we know how important family is. Therefore, we take care to teach you all the important vocabulary and phrases pertaining to family.

Table of Contents

  1. Why Is It Important to Know Filipino Vocabulary about Family?
  2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first
  3. How FilipinoPod101 Can Help You Learn Filipino Family Terms

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1. Why Is It Important to Know Filipino Vocabulary about Family?

Lioness with Cub

Well, if you’re serious about studying any new language, then learning about the most important social unit in Filipino culture would be a crucial part of your education.

What is family, though? Strictly speaking, it’s a group of people who live together and are supposed to take care of one another. Some of them are genetically linked.

Family isn’t just about who we’re related to by blood, of course. It’s also one of the main influences in shaping every child’s life.

Family is Important for Children’s Healthy Development

Phrases Parents Say

Family is the single most important influence in a child’s life. Children depend on parents and family to protect them and provide for their needs from the day they were born.

Primary caregivers, which usually comprise parents and family, form a child’s first relationships. They are a child’s first teachers and are role models that show kids how to act and experience the world around them.

By nurturing and teaching children during their early years, families play an important role in making sure children are ready to learn when they enter school.

Families Can Take All Shapes and Sizes

However, the way families are put together is by no means standard.

Mom and Daughter

Single-parent and same-gender households have become a new norm the past few decades, and there’s no shame in this. When there is love, connection and proper care, a child can thrive anywhere.

Everyone also knows that sometimes friends can become like family and remain with us for life, because it’s all about human connection.

After all, we share many commonalities simply because we’re human, and we are programmed to connect with one another and belong to a group. This is very important for our well-being and survival.

It’s All About Feeling Connected

As John Northman, a psychologist from Buffalo, NY, told WebMD - feeling connected to others contributes to mental as well as physical health.

He pointed out that when people feel connected, they feel better physically, and they’re also less likely to feel depressed.

Couples Chatting

Or, if they do feel depressed, they’d be in a better position to get out of it when they feel they are connecting with others. This is because they would be psychologically supported too, Northman said.

There has even been some links drawn between addiction and feeling disconnected from others. According to an article in Psychology Today, research indicates that addiction is not solely a substance disorder, but also affected by people feeling insecurely attached to others.

It showed that securely attached individuals tend to feel comfortable in and enjoy life, while insecurely attached people typically struggle to fit in and connect.


2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first

So, it’s clear that for most of us, family is our entry point into connection and belonging. This is true of every culture, so in every country, family takes prominence.

For this reason, FilipinoPod101 offers culturally-relevant lessons that will equip you well to understand families in Philippines.

Here are some of the most important Filipino vocabulary and quotes about family and parenting!

A) Filipino Family Vocabulary

Let’s start with the basic vocabulary. Without this collection of words, you’ll have a hard time describing any member of your family at all.

Family Terms
Family
pamilya
Great grandfather
lolo sa tuhod
Mother
ina
Grandmother
lola
Father
ama
Grandfather
lolo
Wife
asawang babae
Grandchild
apo
Husband
asawang lalaki
Granddaughter
apo na babae
Parent
magulang
Grandson
apo na lalake
Child
bata
Aunt
tiyahin
Daughter
anak na babae
Uncle
tiyuhin
Sister
kapatid na babae
Niece
pamangking babae
Brother
kapatid na lalaki
Nephew
pamangking lalaki
Younger sister
nakababatang kapatid na babae
Younger brother
nakababatang kapatid na lalaki
Older brother
kuya
Great grandmother
lola sa tuhod
Cousin
pinsan
Mother-in-law
biyenan na babae
Father-in-law
biyenan na lalaki
Sister-in-law
hipag
Brother-in-law
bayaw
Partner
kapartner

Family of Three

B) Quotes About Family

Filipino Family Quotes

One of the ways to improve your Filipino language skills is by memorizing quotes from books, or poems.

Either source some from Filipino literature, or make use of ours!

Hindi mo pinipili ang iyong pamilya. Sila ay kaloob sa’yo ng Diyos, gaya ng pagkaloob sa iyo para naman sa kanila.

“You don’t choose your family. They are God’s gift to you, as you are to them.” - Desmond Tutu

Ang pamilya ay hindi isang mahalagang bagay lamang. Ito ay ang lahat.

“Family is not an important thing. It’s everything.” - Michael J. Fox

Ang ibig sabihin ng pamilya ay walang naiiwan o nalilimutan.

“Family means no one gets left behind or forgotten.” - David Ogden Stiers

Ang aking pamilya ang aking lakas at kahinaan.

“My family is my strength and my weakness.” - Aishwarya Rai

Ang pamilya ay isa sa mga pinakamagandang likha ng kalikasan.

“The family is one of nature’s masterpieces.” - George Santayana

Sa panahon ng kagipitan, ang iyong pamilya ang susuporta sa iyo.

“When trouble comes, it’s your family that supports you.” - Guy Lafleur

Ang pamilya ang pinakamahalagang selula ng lipunan.

“The family is the first essential cell of human society.” - Pope John XXIII

Walang isang bagay na kasiya-siya para sa buong pamilya.

“There is no such thing as fun for the whole family.” - Jerry Seinfeld

Kailangan mong ipagtanggol ang iyong dangal. At ang iyong pamilya.

“You have to defend your honor. And your family.” - Suzanne Vega

Lahat ng maligayang pamilya ay pare-pareho; bawat pamilyang malungkot ay malungkot sa sarili nitong paraan.

“All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” - Leo Tolstoy

C) Test Your Knowledge!

Do you feel you have learned a lot in this blog? Let’s quickly test that!

In the table below, match the Filipino vocabulary on the left with the definition of the relative in the right column.

MY RELATIVES
Relative Name Definition
1. pamilya a. My male child
2. ina b. My older male sibling
3. ama c. My female sibling
4. asawang babae d. My child’s child
5. asawang lalaki e. My child’s female child
6. magulang f. My female parent
7. bata g. My grandparent’s mother
8. anak na babae h. Mother to one of my parents
9. anak na lalaki i. Relatives
10. kapatid na babae j. My female child
11. kapatid na lalaki k. My younger male sibling
12. nakababatang kapatid na babae l. Male spouse
13. nakababatang kapatid na lalaki m. The father of one of my parents
14. kuya n. My child’s male child
15. lola sa tuhod o. My children’s father or mother
16. lolo sa tuhod p. The sister of one of my parents
17. lola q. The brother of one of my parents
18. lolo r. My male parent
19. apo s. My sibling’s female child
20. apo na babae t. My sibling’s male child
21. apo na lalake u. My male sibling
22. tiyahin v. My parents’ sibling’s child
23. tiyuhin w. Female spouse
24. pamangking babae x. The grandfather of one of my parents
25. pamangking lalaki y. The person I am a parent to
26. pinsan z. My younger female sibling

How did it go? Don’t worry if you had trouble with it - you’ll get there! With a bit of practice, and our help at FilipinoPod101, you’ll soon have these family terms under the belt.

Family Shopping


3. How FilipinoPod101 Can Help You Learn Filipino Family Terms

We hope that we helped you expand your family in Filipino vocabulary!

FilipinoPod101, with its innovative online learning system, stands out among online learning platforms to help you master Filipino easily.

Our lessons are tailored not only to increase your language skills, but to also inform you of Filipino culture, including the Filipino family structure.

When you sign up, you will get instant access to tools like:

1 - An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
2 - A new Filipino word to learn every day
3 - Quick access to the Filipino Key Phrase List
4 - A free Filipino online dictionary
5 - The excellent 100 Core Filipino Word List
6 - An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

Further speed up your learning with the help of a personal tutor, who will first assess your current Filipino language abilities to personalize your training and tailor it to your needs.

Hard work always pays off, and to help you in this, FilipinoPod101 will be there every step of the way toward your Filipino mastery!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Family Phrases in Filipino

Answers: 1.i. 2.f. 3.r. 4.w. 5.l. 6.o. 7.y. 8.j. 9.a. 10.c. 11.u. 12.z. 13.k. 14.b. 15.g 16.x. 17.h. 18.m. 19.d. 20.e. 21.n. 22.p. 23.q. 24.s. 25.t. 26.v.

The Bonifacio Day Anniversary in the Philippines

The Bonifacio Day Anniversary in the Philippines

On Bonifacio Day, Philippines citizens remember the life of Andrés Bonifacio, one of the country’s most important figures. Bonifacio is credited as a significant player in the eventual gaining of the Philippines’ republic status and freedom from Spanish colonial rule.

In this article, you’ll learn a little about Bonifacio’s role in history, and how Filipinos observe this holiday today.

At FilipinoPod101.com, we make learning fun and effective! Let’s get started.

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1. What is Bonifacio Day?

On Bonifacio Day, Filipinos commemorate the life of Andrés Bonifacio and remember his significant role in helping the Philippines attain its status as a republic.

Specifically, Bonifacio is known for being the founder of the Katipunan. This organization ran in secret, with goals directly related to the end of Spanish colonial rule and the eventual gaining of republic status for the Philippines. In 1896, four years after Bonifacio founded the Katipunan, the Spanish uncovered this secret. This discovery led to the beginning of the Phillipine Revolution.

Due to political rivalries and upset within the Katipunan itself, Bonifacio eventually left the organization after failing to be voted its president. Bonifacio believed the results were fixed and chose to become a rebel leader elsewhere.

The end of his life neared when Aguinaldo—the man who won the Katipunan vote for president—captured and tried him. Bonifacio was put to death in 1897.

Many Filipinos believe that Bonifacio should be recognized as the Philippine Republic’s first president.

2. Bonifacio Day Date

Filipino Flag

Each year, Filipinos celebrate Bonifacio Day on November 30, the date of Andrés Bonifacio’s birthday. They don’t commemorate him on the day of his death, because of the circumstances surrounding it.

3. How is Bonifacio Day Celebrated?

Victorious Fist in Air

Bonifacio Day celebrations vary from region to region. For the majority of Filipinos, the Bonifacio Day holiday means a day off from work or school.

Some people choose to use this time to visit monuments or sites dedicated to Bonifacio. Others, however, take a day off to relax and indulge in enjoyable activities.

More Bonifacio Day activities include parades and concerts—don’t be surprised to hear a Bonifacio Day speech, either!

4. Association with José Rizal

Near the start of Bonifacio’s engagement in political activities, he served as a co-founder of La Liga Filipina, along with José Rizal, another monumental figure in Filipino history. The La Liga Filipina essentially strove to challenge the Spanish colonial rule, and to request reforms in how the Spanish governed the Philippines.

After the arrest and deportation of Rizal, Bonifacio eventually took lead of the La Liga Filipina. Further, Rizal’s arrest sparked Bonifacio’s founding of the Katipunan in 1892.

5. Essential Filipino Vocabulary for Bonifacio Day

Cat in Lion Shadow

Here’s some vocabulary you should know for Bonifacio Day in the Philippines!

  • Manggagawa — “Worker”
  • Lungsod ng Kalookan — “Caloocan”
  • Andres Bonifacio — “Andres Bonifacio”
  • Kalayaan — “Freedom”
  • Kilusan — “Movement”
  • Kagitingan — “Valor”
  • Katipunan — “Assembly”
  • Katapangan — “Bravery”
  • Kasarinlan — “Independence”
  • Rebolusyon — “Revolution”
  • Inang Bayan — “Motherland”

To hear each of these vocabulary words pronounced, and to read them alongside relevant images for enhanced learning, be sure to visit our Filipino Bonifacio Day word list!

Final Thoughts

As you can see, Andrés Bonifacio is a major figure in the Philippines, and one very much admired by many Filipinos.

Does your country have a holiday commemorating the birth or death of a beloved figure? Let us know in the comments!

Learning about a country’s culture may be the most fascinating and enriching aspect of trying to master its language. If you want more information on Filipino culture, you may enjoy the following pages on FilipinoPod101.com:

At FilipinoPod101.com, it’s our goal to make learning Filipino as simple and painless as possible. We provide tons of free lessons, vocabulary lists, and blog posts on both cultural and language-related topics. Start by creating your free lifetime account today!

You’ll be reading, writing, and speaking Filipino like a native before you know it, and we’ll be here with help and guidance every step of the way.

Happy Filipino learning!

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How To Post In Perfect Filipino on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Filipino, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Filipino.

At Learn Filipino, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Filipino in the process.

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1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Filipino

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Filipino. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Juan eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Juan’s post.

Masarap kumain kapag kasama ang barkada!
“It’s fun to eat when together with the gang!”

1- Masarap kumain

First is an expression meaning “It’s fun to eat.”
We use this expression to say that an action is fun to do. By changing the verb, this expression can be used for other things such as traveling or shopping.

2- kapag kasama ang barkada

Then comes the phrase - “when together with the gang.”
Young adults in the Philippines usually go out to eat after work on Fridays because there’s no work the next day. They usually take pictures of the food they eat and ask the waiters to take group pictures of them inside the restaurant. Photos of food and groups of friends are some of the most common posts you will find on social media in the Philippines. Some people take home food from the restaurant as a souvenir for their family.

COMMENTS

In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

1- Mas masarap kumain kung kasama ako!

His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning - “It’s more fun if I’m there!”
Use this expression when you’re being humorous, but also feel a bit left out.

2- Ang yaman ni tito! Libre mo rin ako.

His girlfriend’s nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “Uncle is rich! Treat me too.”
This is another phrase that indicates you feel a bit left out, and wish you could be included.

3- So hindi masarap kumain sa bahay?

His girlfriend, Ana, uses an expression meaning - “So it’s not fun to eat at home?”
Use this expression if you’re perhaps feeling a bit insulted that the poster eats out, as opposed to at home, but it could be meant humorously too.

4- Sa susunod sama rin kami!

His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning - “Next time, we’ll join too!”
Use this expression when you are feeling optimistic that you will be part of the party next time.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • barkada: “gang, group of friends”
  • kasama: “with, including”
  • tito: “uncle”
  • ilibre: “to be treated”
  • kumain: “eat”
  • bahay: “house”
  • sumama: “to join”
  • susunod: “next”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Filipino restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Filipino

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Filipino phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Ana shop with her sister at the mall, posts an image of them in the shop, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Maganda ba? Paki-comment.
    “Is it beautiful? Please comment.”

    1- Maganda ba?

    First is an expression meaning “Is it beautiful?”
    We ask this question when we want to know if something - clothes, movies, songs, etc, is good or beautiful. Filipinos often ask their friends for advice and post selfies with the items they’ve just bought on their social media sites.

    2- Paki-comment.

    Then comes the phrase - “Please comment”.
    Filipinos often borrow English words and expressions to use them in the context of Filipino grammar. You can find a lot of English words combined with Filipino words on social media.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ang ganda! Pang-ootd

    Her neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning - “Nice O.O.T.D. (Outfit Of The Day)!”
    Use this expression when you feel appreciative of the garment shown in the poster’s photo.

    2- Grabe! Ikaw na tita ang maganda.

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “Fine! You’re the pretty one, aunt.”
    Use this expression if you want to compliment the poster on her looks. Careful not to insult the sister, though!

    3- Alin? Yung damit o ikaw? Hehehe

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning - “Which one? The dress or you? Hahaha”
    Use this expression if you’re feeling humorous and want to tease the poster.

    4- Ganda talaga!

    Her boyfriend, Juan, uses an expression meaning - “Really nice!”
    Use this phrase to express appreciation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • maganda: “beautiful”
  • pang: “for”
  • ikaw na: “you’re the one “
  • alin: “which”
  • talaga: “really”
  • grabe: “super, over extreme, severe”
  • paki: “please”
  • tita: “aunt”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Filipino

    Sports events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunity for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Filipino.

    Juan plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of himself on the beach, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Ako dapat ang representative natin sa Olympics!
    “I should be our representative for the Olympics!”

    1- Ako dapat

    First is an expression meaning “I should.”
    This expression is used to suggest that we should be the person to perform an action. Filipinos are not shy on social media and often brag about themselves or volunteer themselves to do something challenging. For example, if someone were to post that they lost in a competition, many of their friends would comment that they should have been in the competition instead. However, most of these comments are not taken seriously and considered to be jokes.

    2- ang representative natin sa Olympics

    Then comes the phrase - “be our representative in the Olympics.”
    The Olympics is a very popular event in the Philippines, and many Filipinos root for the country winning its first gold medal. It won one gold medal for junior archery in the 2014 Nanjing Summer Olympics. Filipino athletes have earned a total of 102 medals for the summer games but has yet to receive gold.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Weh? Di nga?

    His nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “Oh? Really?”
    Use this expression to challenge the poster’s comment.

    2- Yan pala ang trip mo pre.

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning - “So that’s what you’re into, bro.”
    Use this expression when you are feeling frivolous, and just to be part of the conversation.

    3- Kapal!

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning - “Thick-skinned!”
    Use this expression when you want to give an opinion about the poster’s attitude.

    4- Pogi!

    His girlfriend, Ana, uses an expression meaning - “Handsome!”
    Use this expression to compliment the poster on their good looks.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ako: “I”
  • natin: “our”
  • pre: “bro / brother (casual reference of a male speaker to his male friend)”
  • kapal: “thick, thick-skinned (used to describe the action of someone shamelessly promoting or bragging about himself/herself)”
  • pogi: “handsome”
  • di nga: “really? “
  • weh: “oh (used to express doubt)”
  • dapat: “should”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Filipino

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Ana shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Fav song ko na to!
    “This is now my favorite song!”

    1- fav song ko na

    First is an expression meaning “now my favorite song.”
    This expression can be used to talk about your favorite things simply by changing the noun.

    2- to

    Then comes the phrase - “this.”
    Filipinos often share their emotions on social media by posting songs that reflect their moods. Aside from selfies or group photos, sharing songs and videos are among the top posts you’ll find on Philippine social media. Some Filipinos like making their own videos on YouTube and adding their favorite songs to the background. Others will make music videos with their partner’s pictures, sometimes even adding their own quotes to the video, as a symbol of their love.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Gawin nating theme song.

    Her boyfriend, Juan, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s make this our theme song.”
    Use this expression when you’re feeling romantic and wish to give special meaning to the song.

    2- Hindi ako maka-relate.

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “I can’t relate.”
    Use this expression when you want to share your personal, negative opinion about the song.

    3- Ang daming feelings!

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning - “The feels!”
    Use this expression to indicate that you like the song, and that it touches you.

    4- Ang ganda ng kanta!

    Her neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning - “The song is beautiful!”
    Use this expression when you wish to compliment the song.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • fav: “favorite”
  • gawin: “to make”
  • maka: “to (added before a verb to express the ability to perform that verb)”
  • dami: “many”
  • kanta: “song”
  • hindi: “not, no”
  • na: “already”
  • to (ito): “this”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Filipino Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in Filipino!

    Juan goes to a concert, posts an image of the crowd, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Sobrang saya ng concert!
    “The concert was super fun!”

    1- sobrang saya

    First is an expression meaning “super fun.”
    We use this expression to describe something or someone as being very happy or great fun.

    2- ng concert

    Then comes the phrase - “the concert.”
    Concerts are popular in the Philippines. Many live bands play in restaurants at night, especially on Fridays and weekends, catering to young adults that are off from work. Here, customers can request the songs they want the band to play. They can also ask to sing or play together with the band. These live performances usually end late, some even continuing on until 1 or 2 AM.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ayos!

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning - “That’s good!”
    Use this expression to show that you approve of the post.

    2- Yun oh!

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning - “There it is!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic.

    3- Mabuti at nag-enjoy kayo.

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning - “Great, you enjoyed it.”
    Use this expression to just comment and be part of the conversation in a benevolent, friendly way.

    4- Naks naman. Inggit much.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “How great. I envy you a lot.”
    Use this expression when you feel a bit jealous of the poster and his experience, but not in a nasty way.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • sobra: “super, too much”
  • ayos: “good, excellent, wonderful, fantastic”
  • yun oh!: “there it is! (used to express excitement about something or someone; used to emphasize something or someone)”
  • mabuti: “good”
  • kayo: “you (plural)”
  • naks: “good, great”
  • inggit: “envy, jealous”
  • saya: “fun, happy”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert , which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Filipino

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Filipino phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Ana accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Nasira ang phone ko!
    “My phone broke!”

    1- Nasira

    First is an expression meaning “broke.”
    We use this word to talk about things that are broken. For example, you can use it in reference to electronics, furniture, clothing, accessories, household items, etc.

    2- ang phone ko

    Then comes the phrase - “my phone.”
    Some words used on Filipino social media are borrowed from the English language, especially terms related to technology and the internet.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Naku! Anong nangyari?

    Her supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning - “Oh my! What happened?”
    Use this question to show your surprise and want to know the details of the accident.

    2- Nandito lang kami kung kailangan mo ng tulong.

    Her neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning - “We’re here if you need help.”
    Use this expression if you feel helpful.

    3- Sayang!

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “What a waste! (too bad)”
    Use this expression to comment with your opinion, and it’s also a way of expressing sympathy.

    4- Bakit nasira?

    Her boyfriend, Juan, uses an expression meaning - “Why did it break?”
    Ask this question if you would like more details about the incident, which is a nice way to keep the conversation going.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • nasira: “broke”
  • nangyari: “happened”
  • nandito: “here”
  • tulong: “help”
  • kailanganin: “to need”
  • sayang: “what a waste”
  • bakit: “why”
  • ano: “what”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to describe an accident in Filipino. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Filipino

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Filipino!

    Juan gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Walang magawa sa bahay…
    “Nothing to do at home….”

    1- walang magawa

    First is an expression meaning “nothing to do.”
    This expression indicates that the speaker is bored with his or her current situation and cannot do anything about it.

    2- sa bahay

    Then comes the phrase - “at home”.
    During hot seasons, most Filipinos stay at home to avoid the heat. Many tend to take afternoon naps. Children are also ordered to take afternoon naps during summer vacation. However, some people go out to the malls to cool themselves off and ease their boredom.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Sinabi mo pa!

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning - “You said it!”
    Use this expression to indicate that you’re feeling the same as the poster.

    2- Matulog ka na lang.

    His girlfriend, Ana, uses an expression meaning - “Just sleep.”
    Use this expression to give advice.

    3- Ako rin!

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning - “Me too!”
    This is another expression that shows you feel the same as the poster.

    4- Buti ka pa!

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning - “Good for you! (envious)”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • wala: “nothing”
  • bahay: “home, house”
  • sinabi: “to say”
  • rin: “too”
  • matulog: “to sleep”
  • buti: “good”
  • lang: “only”
  • sa: “at”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Filipino

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Filipino about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Ana feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Pagod! Grabe ang araw na to!
    “Tired! This day is just too much!”

    1- pagod

    First is an expression meaning “tired.”
    We use this word to express that we are tired or exhausted from doing something.

    2- grabe ang araw na to

    Then comes the phrase - “this day is too much.”
    We use this phrase when we feel especially tired compared to other days. Filipinos often say this when they’re exhausted from working overtime or getting stuck in traffic on the way home.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Galing sa work?

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning - “From work?”
    Ask this question if you want to know more details about the post.

    2- Pahinga ka na mahal.

    Her boyfriend, Juan, uses an expression meaning - “Rest already, dear.”
    Use this expression to show that you care, and want to advise your beloved to rest.

    3- Good job ngayong araw.

    Her supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning - “Good job today.”
    This is a compliment from the supervisor, which means he was pleased with her work.

    4- Gusto mo ng masahe tita?

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “Do you want a massage, aunt?”
    Use this expression to make a suggestion, indicating that you want to be helpful.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • grabe: “too much”
  • araw: “day”
  • magpahinga: “to rest/to relax”
  • pagod: “tired”
  • gusto: “to like/ to want”
  • masahe: “massage”
  • galing: “from”
  • ngayon: “now, today”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Filipino! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Filipino

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Filipino.

    Juan suffers an injury, posts an image of himself in pain, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Napilayan ako kanina. Ang sakit!
    “I sprained myself. It’s painful!”

    1- napilayan ako kanina

    First is an expression meaning “I sprained myself.”
    We use this expression to say that we hurt ourselves or sprained some part of our body.

    2- ang sakit

    Then comes the phrase - “it’s painful/ it hurts.”
    Filipino men typically get injured after playing basketball with their friends since basketball is one of the most popular sports in the country and almost all the men play it. Companies even encourage their employees to play basketball with their coworkers as a way of encouraging work and life balance.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Mag-ingat ka Juan. Kaya mo yan.

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning - “Take care, Juan. You can do it.”
    Use this expression to show your concern, and offer support.

    2- Ingat sa susunod.

    His neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning - “Be careful next time.”
    Use this expression to offer advice that also shows concern for the poster’s wellbeing.

    3- Huwag kang mag-alala bukas lang magaling ka na.

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t worry. Tomorrow you’ll be okay.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic that the injury is not too bad.

    4- Wala yan! Takbo pa!

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “That’s nothing! Come on, run!”
    Use this expression if you want to lift the poster’s spirit by making a bit of fun with him.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • kanina: “earlier, a little while ago”
  • pagaling: “to get well”
  • sa: “at”
  • huwag: “do not”
  • kaya: “able, can”
  • sakit: “painful”
  • tumakbo: “to run”
  • wala yan: “that’s nothing”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Filipino

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Ana feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Walang tigil ang ulan at nasaan ka araw?
    “The rain isn’t stopping, and where is the sun?”

    1- walang tigil ang ulan

    First is an expression meaning “the rain isn’t stopping.”
    When there is heavy rain or it seems like the rain won’t stop soon, we normally use this phrase.

    2- at nasaan ka araw

    Then comes the phrase - “and where is the sun?.”
    This phrase is from a popular Filipino song and is well-known by all generations. Filipinos have a habit of quoting relevant song lyrics when they post on social media websites. They also have a saying that sometimes the rain is caused by someone’s bad singing.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Itulog mo na lang yan.

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning - “Just sleep it off.”
    Use this expression to offer advice.

    2- Sisikat din ang araw.

    Her supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning - “The sun will shine too.”
    Use this expression to be supportive and positive.

    3- Kumanta ka kasi tita.

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “It’s because you sang, aunt.”
    Use this expression to make fun of the poster in a friendly, teasing way.

    4- Huwag kang mag-alala lilipas din yan.

    Her neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t worry, it’ll pass.”
    Use this expression if you want to remind the poster not to care too much.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • tumigil: “to stop”
  • ulan: “rain”
  • nasaan: “where”
  • itulog: “sleep it off”
  • sumikat: “to shine, to rise”
  • kumanta: “to sing”
  • kasi: “because”
  • lumipas: “to pass”
  • How would you comment in Filipino when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Filipino

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Juan changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Sa wakas! Sinagot na niya ‘ko!
    “Finally! She said yes!”

    1- sa wakas

    First is an expression meaning “finally.”
    This phrase is used when a long-awaited event finally materializes.

    2- sinagot na niya ‘ko

    Then comes the phrase - “He/She answered me already.”
    Filipino men normally court and confess to women. Women can also confess to men, but normally it’s the other way around. A traditional way of courting is by serenading a woman. However, these days some couples end up together through messaging on social media sites or sending text messages.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Swerte mo pare! Inuman mamaya!

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning - “Man, you’re lucky! Drinks later!”
    Use this expression if you’re feeling appreciative of the poster’s new status, and want to celebrate it.

    2- Magandang balita! Congrats sa inyong dalawa!

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning - “Good news! Congratulations to you two.”
    Use this expression to congratulate the couple in a more traditional way.

    3- OMG! Super bagay kayong dalawa!

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning - “Oh my God! You suit each other!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling enthusiastic and optimistic about the relationship match.

    4- Dapat ilibre mo kami tito!

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “Uncle, you should treat us!”
    Use this expression to show you want to celebrate the event.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • wakas: “end, final”
  • suwerte, swerte: “lucky”
  • inuman: “drink, drinking party”
  • mamaya: “later”
  • balita: “news”
  • dalawa: “two”
  • manlibre: “to treat someone”
  • sinagot: “to answer, to accept the person as a partner or lover”
  • What would you say in Filipino when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Filipino

    Wow, so things got serious quickly, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Filipino.

    Ana is getting married today, so she eaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Hindi ako makapaniwala! Kasal ko na ngayon!
    “I can’t believe it! It’s my wedding day!”

    1- hindi ako makapaniwala

    First is an expression meaning “I can’t believe it.”
    We say this when something amazing or unbelievable has happened.

    2- kasal ko na ngayon

    Then comes the phrase - “It’s my wedding today.”
    Filipino weddings are almost the same as Western weddings. The bride normally wears a white gown and the groom a suit. Weddings can take place in church, at the beach, at the park, or anywhere the couple wishes to conduct their marriage ceremony.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Akin ang bouquet ha?

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning - “The bouquet is mine, okay?”
    Use this expression if you feel humorous. It is the tradition at many weddings for the bride to throw her bouquet to specifically the unmarried female guests. The one who catches it is believed to be the next bride.

    2- Ako ang pinakamaswerteng lalaki sa mundo ngayon!

    Her husband, Juan, uses an expression meaning - “I’m the luckiest man in the world today!”
    Use this expression to indicate your pride and happiness to be the groom of the poster.

    3- Pagkahaba-haba man ng prusisyon, sa simbahan din ang tuloy!

    Her supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning - “(proverb) No matter how long the procession is, it always ends up in a church!”
    This is an old proverb often used to refer to couples getting married.

    4- Kayo na talaga ang para sa isa’t-isa!

    Her college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning - “You’re really meant to be with each other!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling positive about the match.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • kasal: “wedding”
  • pinakamaswerte: “luckiest”
  • akin: “mine”
  • pagkahaba-haba: “very long”
  • simbahan: “church”
  • isa’t-isa: “each other”
  • prusisyon: “procession”
  • tumuloy: “to continue”
  • How would you respond in Filipino to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Filipino

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Filipino.

    Juan finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of him and Ana together, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Magiging tatay na ako!
    “I’m going to be a father!”

    1- magiging

    First is an expression meaning “will become” or “going to be”
    This is used to express the future state or of something becoming.

    2- tatay na ako

    Then comes the phrase - “to be a father”
    Filipino couples invite their closest friends to be the godmother or godfather of their babies. Usually, a child has more than one godparent, and typically there should be an equal number of male and female godparents. The godparents’ duties are mostly to give presents to the child on their birthdays and on Christmas Day.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Napakagandang balita! Congrats!

    His neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning - “Very good news! Congratulations!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling positive about the news, and wish the new parents well.

    2- Siguradong magiging mabuting tatay ka!

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning - “You sure are going to be a great dad!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic about the poster’s fathering potential.

    3- Congrats sa inyong dalawa. Alagaan mo nang mabuti ang pamilya mo.

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations to the both of you. Take good care of your family.”
    This is a traditional congratulatory phrase when a couple announce a pregnancy.

    4- Sana hindi mo kamukha tito.

    His nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “I hope the baby doesn’t look like you, uncle.”
    Use this expression when you are in a humorous mood and want to tease the father a bit.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • tatay: “father, dad”
  • napakaganda: “very beautiful”
  • sigurado: “sure”
  • maging: “to become”
  • maligayang bati: “congratulations”
  • alagaan: “to take care”
  • kamukha: “to look like, to resemble”
  • sana hindi: “I hope not”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Filipino Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Filipino.

    Ana plays with her baby, posts an image of the cherub, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Ang baby namin! Sino ang kamukha?
    “Our baby! Who does she look like?”

    1- ang baby namin

    First is an expression meaning “our baby.”
    Filipinos normally use the English word “baby” to refer to their newborns or young children.

    2- sino ang kamukha?

    Then comes the phrase - “who does he/she look like?.”
    When a child is born in the Philippines, friends and family usually debate over who the baby looks like. If the baby is cute, nearly everyone claims that the child takes after them.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Cuteness overload! Siyempre kamukha ni Mommy!

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning - “Very cute! Of course she looks like her mother!”
    Use this expression to indicate that you side with the mother in terms of the baby’s looks.

    2- Hindi na kailangang tanungin! Kamukha ko!

    Her husband, Juan, uses an expression meaning - “No need to ask! She looks like me!”
    Use this expression to indicate that you feel you are the parent who bestowed good looks on the child.

    3- Pare suko ka na! Cute yung bata eh.

    Her college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning - “Man, give up already! The baby is cute.”
    Use this expression to show your appreciation of the baby’s adorable appearance.

    4- Nakakawala ng pagod ang ngiti at tawa niya!

    Her neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning - “Her smile and laughter relieves me of stress!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • sino: “who”
  • siyempre: “of course”
  • tanungin: “to ask”
  • pare: “man, bro (used by a male speaker to call his male friend)”
  • nakakawala: “gets rid of”
  • pagod: “stress, tiredness”
  • ngiti: “smile”
  • tawa: “laugh”
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Filipino! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Filipino Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Juan goes to a family gathering, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Kumpleto ang pamilya!
    “The family is complete!”

    1- kumpleto ang

    First is an expression meaning “complete.”
    This is normally used as a caption for family group pictures during family reunions.

    2- pamilya

    Then comes the phrase - “family.”
    Many Filipino families have a tradition of throwing a family reunion during Christmas or New Year. Because most Filipino families are large, distant relatives come to town to visit their family members during these reunions. Many of the activities include singing karaoke, lighting fireworks, and eating and drinking.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Hindi! Wala yung aso tito!

    His nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “No! The dog isn’t there, uncle!”
    Use this expression when you are feeling humorous.

    2- Masaya kasama ang buong pamilya!

    His wife, Ana, uses an expression meaning - “It’s fun being with the whole family!”
    Use this expression to indicate your appreciation of the gathering.

    3- Ang ganda ng pamilya ninyo!

    His neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning - “Your family is beautiful!”
    This phrase compliments the good looks of the family members.

    4- Dapat talaga nagkikita nang madalas ang buong pamilya.

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning - “Families should really get together often.”
    Use this expression to share a positive opinion about family get-togethers.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • masaya kasama: “happy to be with, good to be with”
  • kumpleto: “complete”
  • aso: “dog”
  • hindi: “no”
  • magkita: “to meet”
  • madalas: “often”
  • buo: “whole”
  • talaga: “really”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Filipino

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know how to post and leave comments in Filipino about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Ana waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Excited na ako! Sana walang maging problema!
    “I’m excited! I hope there won’t be any problem!”

    1- excited ako

    First is an expression meaning “I’m excited”.
    Filipinos borrow the English word “excited” because there is no equivalent Filipino word that expresses this emotion.

    2- sana walang maging problema

    Then comes the phrase - “hope there won’t be any problem.”
    Since the Philippines is composed of around 7,000 islands, the only way to travel around the country is by plane. So when someone goes on a trip, many of their friends and relatives will wish and pray for their safety.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Enjoyin mo yan to the max!

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning - “Enjoy it to the max!”
    Use this expression to wish the poster full enjoyment of the holiday.

    2- Tita pasalubong ko ha. Salamat po!

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “Aunt, my souvenir, okay. Thank you!”
    Use this expression to indicate you’re expecting a gift when they’re back.

    3- Ingat sa biyahe.

    Her supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning - “Have a safe trip.”
    This is an old-fashioned, traditional way of wishing someone a good trip.

    4- Dapat sinama ninyo ako!

    Her college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning - “You should’ve taken me with you!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous, and wish you were part of the expedition.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ty: “thank you”
  • problema: “problem”
  • pasalubong: “souvenir”
  • ha: “okay”
  • mag-ingat: “to take care or caution”
  • biyahe: “trip”
  • sinama: “to be included, taken”
  • enjoyin: “to enjoy something”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Filipino!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Filipino

    So maybe you’re strolling around at a local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Filipino phrases!

    Juan finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Astig! Meron palang ganito!
    “Epic! Didn’t know there was something like this!”

    1- astig

    First is an expression meaning “epic.”
    This word is commonly used to express a person’s amazement about something or someone.

    2- meron palang ganito

    Then comes the phrase - “I didn’t know there was something like this”.
    When someone finds something peculiar, they say this phrase to express that it’s the first time they’ve seen something like it. Filipinos love to share the things they find with their friends on social media sites.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Lupit! Para saan yan?

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning - “Wow! What’s that for?”
    Use this expression to show you are impressed and would like to know more about the object.

    2- Hindi naman astig. Walang kwenta.

    His nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “Not cool. Worthless.”
    Use this expression when you don’t have a high opinion of the find.

    3- Siguradong magugustuhan din iyan ng pamilya mo.

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning - “Your family will also surely like that.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic the find will be worth something to the family.

    4- Minsan mas maganda pa talagang mamili sa palengke.

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning - “Sometimes it’s (really) nicer to shop at local stores.”
    Use this to express a personal opinion about shopping, if you’re feeling positive about the find.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • pala: “apparently “
  • lupit: “extreme, super, severe, unbelievable”
  • kwenta: “worth”
  • sigurado: “surely”
  • mamili: “to shop”
  • lokal: “local”
  • pamilihan: “store, market”
  • mas maganda: “better”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Filipino

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Filipino, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Ana visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    The best ang lugar na ito!
    “This place is the best!”

    1- da best

    First is an expression meaning “the best.”
    This expression is borrowed from English; however, the spelling for “the” is changed. This describes something or someone as being number one or the best at something.

    2- ang lugar na ito

    Then comes the phrase - “this place is.”
    When Filipinos go on vacation, the top two things they do are go shopping and take pictures for their social media sites.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Mabuti at nagustuhan mo mahal.

    Her husband, Juan, uses an expression meaning - “Glad that you liked it dear.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling determined.

    2- The best din yung kumuha ng litrato.

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning - “The person who took the picture is also the best.”
    Use this expression to be appreciative of the poster.

    3- Bakit ka nandyan tita? Anong meron?

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “Why are you there, aunt? What’s up?”
    Use this expression if you’re curious and want to know more about the poster’s whereabouts.

    4- Antayin ninyo! Pupuntahan ko rin iyan!

    Her college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning - “Just wait! I will go there too!”
    Use this expression to show you wish to also visit the place.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • da best: “the best”
  • lugar: “place”
  • kumuha: “to take”
  • anong meron: “what’s up”
  • antayin: “to wait”
  • litrato: “picture”
  • nandiyan: “there”
  • pupuntahan: “to go”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Filipino

    So you’re doing nothing yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Filipino!

    Juan relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Pahinga din pag may time
    “Relax when you have the time.”

    1- magpahinga din

    First is an expression meaning “relax”.
    Filipinos love to rest. There is a tradition of taking an afternoon nap whenever someone has the time. Children, especially, are expected to take an afternoon nap.

    2- pag may time

    Then comes the phrase - “when you have the time.”
    This expression is commonly used on social media by yuppies or young professionals to express that a person should do something if they have extra free time.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Tama! Mahalagang alagaan ang kalusugan.

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning - “Right! It’s important to take care of your health”.
    Use this expression to be old fashioned.

    2- Iba talaga kapag mayaman!

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning - “It’s really different when you’re rich!”
    Use this expression to share the personal opinion that only the rich can relax well.

    3- Naks naman ang daming time ni tito! Pahingi ako.

    His nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “Wow! Uncle has a lot of time! Give me some.”
    Use this expression when you’re envious that the poster has the time to relax.

    4- Mabuti iyan para sa inyong mag-asawa.

    His neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning - “That’s good for the two of you.”
    Use this expression when you’re happy that the poster has the opportunity to rest.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • magpahinga: “to relax”
  • din: “too”
  • pag: “when”
  • tama: “right, correct”
  • mahalaga: “important”
  • kalusugan: “health”
  • iba: “different”
  • mayaman: “rich”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Filipino When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Ana returns home after a vacation, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Nandito na kami!
    “We’re here!”

    1- nandito na

    First is an expression meaning “are here.”
    This expression is very useful, especially when you want to inform your friends that you have arrived at home or at your meeting place.

    2- kami

    Then comes the phrase - “we.”
    Filipinos usually inform their friends and loved ones whenever they’re going away on a trip or when they have come back from one since everyone is expecting to hear stories about their adventure.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Maligayang pagdating!

    Her neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning - “Welcome back!”
    This is the traditional welcoming when people return from a trip.

    2- Salamat sa Diyos at nakabalik kayo nang maayos.

    Her supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning - “Thank God you came back safely.”
    Use this expression to indicate your happiness about the poster’s safe return.

    3- Kailan kayo bumalik? Balitaan mo ako!

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning - “When did you come back? Update me!”
    The question indicates that you wish to know more details, and want the conversation to go on.

    4- Asan na ang pasalubong ko?

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “Where’s my souvenir?”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • nandito na: “already here”
  • pagdating: “arrival”
  • salamat: “thanks”
  • bumalik: “to return”
  • maayos: “well”
  • kailan: “when”
  • balitaan: “to inform, to tell”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a public commemoration day such as Independence Day?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Filipino

    It’s an historic day and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Juan watches Independence Day fireworks show, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Maligayang araw ng kalayaan!
    “Happy Independence Day!”

    1- maligayang

    First is an expression meaning “happy.”
    This phrase is used to greet people on the Philippine Independence Day on June 12. The Philippine flag is raised simultaneously at several locations in the country.

    2- araw ng kalayaan

    Then comes the phrase - “Independence Day.”
    During Independence Day, most Filipinos put up a flag at their house, children usually wave flags around, and most stores give them away to their customers. Because Independence Day is a non-working holiday in the Philippines, some families go to Rizal Park in Manila to see the Independence Day parade and ceremony.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ganoon din sa iyo.

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning - “Same to you.”
    Use this expression to return the poster’s wish.

    2- Talaga bang malaya na tayo?

    His nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “Are we truly free?”
    This is a philosophical question that could indicate you’re not feeling optimistic about your freedom.

    3- Mabuhay ang Pilipinas!

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning - “Hooray for the Philippines!”
    This is a traditional exclamation on Independence Day.

    4- Cheers! Para sa mga susunod pang taon!

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning - “Cheers! For the next years!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic and enthusiastic.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • kalayaan: “independence, freedom”
  • malaya: “free”
  • tayo: “we”
  • mabuhay: “to live”
  • Pilipinas: “Philippines”
  • ng: “of”
  • ang: “the”
  • taon: “year”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    Independence Day and other public commemoration days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Filipino

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Ana goes to her birthday party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Maraming salamat sa lahat ng bumati sa akin ngayong birthday ko!
    “Many thanks to all the people who greeted me today on my birthday!”

    1- maraming salamat sa lahat ng

    First is an expression meaning “many thanks to all who.”
    Most Filipinos put their birthday information in public view on their social media websites so all of their friends can send them greetings on their birthdays.

    2- bumati sa akin ngayong birthday ko

    Then comes the phrase - “greeted me today on my birthday.”
    Most Filipinos celebrate their birthdays. Children invite all their friends and relatives to their birthday party either at home, at school, or at restaurants. Adults usually celebrate their birthday with their friends and loved ones. Friends and relatives are supposed to bring a present when they are invited to a birthday party.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Walang anuman.

    Her college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning - “You’re welcome.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous.

    2- Tumanda ka na ng isang taon ngayong araw tita!

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “You’re one year older today aunt!”
    Use this expression to make conversation in a humorous way, teasing the poster a bit about her age.

    3- Maligayang kaarawan!

    Her supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning - “Happy Birthday!”
    This is the traditional birthday wish.

    4- HBD! Masaya ako para sayo.

    Her neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning - “Happy Birthday! I’m happy for you.”
    A variation on the traditional birthday wish that also indicate your happiness for the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • lahat: “all”
  • bumati: “to greet”
  • walang anuman: “you’re welcome”
  • tumanda: “to get older”
  • isang taon: “one year”
  • maligayang kaarawan: “happy birthday”
  • HBD: “Happy Birthday”
  • para sayo: “for you”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Filipino

    Impress your friends with your Filipino New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Juan celebrates the New Year, posts an image of the festivities, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Maligayang bagong taon!
    “Happy New Year!”

    1- maligayang

    First is an expression meaning “happy”.
    This expression is used to greet everyone during the new year in the Philippines. People usually say this to those they meet during the last week of December to the first week of January.

    2- bagong taon

    Then comes the phrase - “New Year.”
    New Year’s celebrations in the Philippines are very lively. People normally light up fireworks, sing karaoke, eat a variety of foods, and play loud music. Neighborhoods are filled with loud music and noise from New Year’s Eve until the end of January 1st. Filipinos do a countdown and have a tradition of jumping at exactly 0:00 in the belief that they will grow taller if they do so.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Manigong bagong taon sa iyo at sa iyong pamilya.

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning - “Happy New Year to you and to your family.”
    This is a traditional well-wish for New Year.

    2- Yehey! Bagong taon! Tara tagay tayo!

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning - “Hooray! New Year! Let’s cheers!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous and enthusiastic about the New Year.

    3- Sana maging mabuti ang bagong taon na ito!

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s hope this year will be a good year!”
    Use this expression to share your hope for a good year ahead.

    4- Paalam sa nakaraang taon! Hello sa bagong taon!

    His wife, Ana, uses an expression meaning - “Goodbye to last year! Hello to the New Year!”
    Use these phrases to indicate you let the past go, and greet the future optimistically.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • bago: “new”
  • manigong: “prosperous”
  • pamilya: “family”
  • yehey: “hooray”
  • tagay: “cheers”
  • tayo: “we, us”
  • paalam: “goodbye”
  • nakaraang: “past, previous”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Filipino

    What will you say in Filipino about Christmas?

    Ana celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Maligayang Pasko sa inyong lahat!
    “Merry Christmas to all of you!”

    1- maligayang pasko

    First is an expression meaning “Merry Christmas.”
    We use this to wish people a Merry Christmas in the Philippines.

    2- sa inyong lahat

    Then comes the phrase - “to all of you.”
    Since the Philippines is about 90% Catholic, a majority of Filipinos celebrate Christmas. People usually go to midnight mass for nine days beginning on December 16 and attend a special mass on Christmas day. People believe that if they complete the entire nine-day midnight mass their wishes will come true. On Christmas Day people visit their relatives and children ask for presents from their godparents and relatives. Filipinos also put up colorful lanterns and lights outside their houses and put up Christmas decorations.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Tita huwag ninyong kalimutan ang regalo ko!

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning - “Aunt, don’t forget about my gift!”
    Use this expression to show you have a serious wish for a gift from the poster.

    2- Maligayang Pasko din sa inyo!

    Her neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning - “Merry Christmas to you too!”
    This is the traditional response when someone addresses you with a Christmas greeting.

    3- Tara simbang gabi tayo!

    Her college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s go to a midnight mass!”
    Use this expression to make a suggestion for Christmas Eve.

    4- Maligayang Pasko! Tara shopping tayo ang daming sale sa mall!

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning - “Merry Christmas! Let’s go shopping, lots of sales at the mall!”
    Use this expression if you want to go Christmas shopping with the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Pasko: “Christmas”
  • kalimutan: “to forget”
  • regalo: “present”
  • ko: “my”
  • inyo: “you, yours”
  • simbang gabi: “Midnight mass (nine consecutive days before Christmas Day)”
  • tara: “let’s go”
  • daming: “many”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Filipino

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Filipino phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Juan celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Maligayang anibersaryo mahal!
    “Happy anniversary, dear!”

    1- maligayang anibersaryo

    First is an expression meaning “Happy anniversary.”
    We use this expression to greet people on their anniversary day.

    2- mahal

    Then comes the phrase - “dear.”
    Couples usually celebrate their anniversary together. The Philippines is the only country in the world (excluding Vatican) where divorce is illegal. So couples normally celebrate their anniversary without fail every year. When people marry in the Philippines it is literally “till death do us part”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Tnx mahal!

    His wife, Ana, uses an expression meaning - “Thanks dear!”
    This would be the normal response to the poster’s comment, if you’re the wife.

    2- Nakakakilig naman!

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning - “It’s so romantic!”
    Use this expression if you think the anniversary is romantic.

    3- Congrats sa anibersaryo ninyo.

    His neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations on your anniversary.”
    This is the traditional wedding anniversary congratulation.

    4- Alagaan mo nang mabuti si Ana kundi lagot ka sa akin!

    His wife’s high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning - “Take care of Ana or else you’ll have to answer to me!”
    Use this expression to be a bit threatening, but mostly in a humorous way.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • anibersaryo: “anniversary”
  • nakakakilig: “(romantic feeling)”
  • ninyo: “you, your”
  • tnx: “thanks”
  • kundi: “if not”
  • lagot: “to be in trouble”
  • ka: “you”
  • naman: “so”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Filipino! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Filipino

    Internet Slang Words in Filipino That Pinoy Millennials Use

    Thumbnail

    The internet gives birth to different trends every now and then. Among them are internet slang words. Expressions like “ASL please,” “CTC?” and “BRB” used to dominate the internet chat scene, particularly during the era of mIRC and Yahoo! Messenger. Now that we have FB Messenger, Twitter, Viber, and WhatsApp, the list has been expanding and will probably continue to do so.

    When sending Filipino text messages or chatting online, knowing the lingo is essential. There’s not a lot of internet slang words in Filipino, but the ones that do exist can be very useful to know when you’re communicating with Pinoy friends online or via text.

    In the Philippines, there are Filipino slang words that have been around even before the internet. And then there are Tagalog Internet slang words, or those that were given birth through social media. In this article, we’ll focus on the latter.

    But why is it so important to learn slang words used in Filipino text messages and chat rooms? Well, let’s just say you don’t want to be left clueless when chatting with friends in the Philippines, particularly with your millennial friends.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Talking Online in Filipino

    Table of Contents

    1. Philippines: Text & Net Capital of the World
    2. Most Common Internet/Text Slang
    3. When Shopping Online
    4. Online Gaming Language
    5. Multi-Layered Slang Words
    6. Ease the Confusion with FilipinoPod101


    1. Philippines: Text & Net Capital of the World

    Various Text Slang Words in Thought Bubbles

    The Filipinos are arguably among the most highly social people in the world. It’s probably the reason that you’ll find Pinoys in practically every country and region around the world. We simply love communicating, which is why it’s no surprise that the Philippines has been labeled as “The Text Capital of the World.” One can argue that it’s just because SMS is more affordable than voice calls in the Philippines, and that Pinoys are kuripot (stingy or just thrifty? It’s up to you to decide.), which is why most Pinoys prefer texting. SMS is indeed a cheaper option, but regardless, it can’t be denied that Filipinos have this deep sense of wanting to stay connected with their friends and loved ones, and one way they do that is through SMS chat.

    But that’s not all. It seems that Pinoys want to up their reputation to another level, because just recently, the Digital 2019 report done by Social and Hootsuite has revealed that the Philippines is no longer simply the text capital of the world, but is also “The Net Capital of the World.” And that’s an impressive feat, considering that the country is one of the slowest on the planet in terms of internet speed. It seems to me that nothing will ever stop the Filipino people’s desire to stay connected to each other!

    Now, without further ado, let’s move on to some of the most common Filipino slang words for text and the internet.


    2. Most Common Internet/Text Slang

    Technology Words

    Filipinos are geniuses when it comes to inventing words and expressions. That said, the list of available Filipino internet and text slang words is so huge that we can’t make them fit in this short article. Nevertheless, we’ll do our best to provide you with the ones you’ll find most useful for everyday use.

    Let’s begin!

    1- Teks

    We want to pay tribute to this very important word by putting it at the top of our list. Teks is the Filipinized form of the word “text,” which refers to a text message sent via Short Message Service (SMS). It’s not very common to see this word anymore, but it’s amusing to know that it’s the same length as its English spelling, “text.”

    • Teks mo ako pag nakauwi ka na.
      “Send me a text message once you get home.”
    • Don’t forget to visit our entry on the most common Tagalog texting slang.

    2- Wer na u?

    The expression Wer na u? first became popular as a form of textspeak. It’s the code-switching of the question, “Where are you now?” using a combination of English and Tagalog. It was adopted for the internet when social media sites like Facebook became popular.

    It’s often followed by Hir na me, or “I’m here already.”

    You use this Filipino text slang when you’re first to arrive at a rendezvous and would like to check on the location of the person (or people) you’re meeting.

    • Guys, wer na u? Hir na me.
      “Where are you, guys? I’m here already.”

    3- Hir na me.

    Just like the previous expression on the list, Hir na me is a form of code-switching, this time for the expression, “I’m here already.” It’s often preceded by Wer na u? although the order of the two is interchangeable. So instead of saying, Were na u? Hir na me, you can also say, Hir na me. Wer na u? In most cases, it can also stand on its own.

    • Guize, hir na me. Bakit ang tagal ninyo?
      “Guys, I’m here already. What’s taking you so long?”

    Woman Watching Her Watch

    Wer na u, guize? Tatlong oras na akong naghihintay!
    (”Where the heck are you, guys? I’ve been waiting for three hours!” )

    4- Guize

    Speaking of guize, it’s the fourth word on our list, and as you already know from the previous example, it’s a Filipino slang word for “guys.” It’s believed to have been given birth by Jejenese, the sociolect of the Jejemons, which is a popular hipster culture in the Philippines.

    • Guize, pasyal tayo kina Rain!
      “Guys, let’s go to Rain’s place!”

    5- OTW/OMW

    This is not necessarily from the Philippines originally, but it’s a very popular Filipino slang. It’s shorthand for “On the way” and “On my way,” respectively.

    • Guize, wait lang ha. OTW/OMW na.
      “Please wait for me, guys. I’m on my way.”

    Man Scaling Building and Pointing to Camera

    6- GBU

    Filipinos are a religious people, so we usually end our messages with a little blessing to our text or chat mates. GBU is short for God Bless U, which is text speak for “God bless you.”

    • Ingat. GBU.
      “Take care. GBU.”

    7- OL ka ba?

    Always wondering whether a friend is online or not? Asking them OL ka ba? is the best way to find out. OL is short for “online.” If someone wants to spend time chatting or texting with you, they’d readily reply with Oo, OL ako. (”Yes, I’m online.” )

    8- SLR

    What do you say to a friend if you’ve missed replying to their text or chat messages? Simple: SLR.

    No, SLR doesn’t stand for “Single-Lens Reflex,” but rather “Sorry, late reply.” In most cases, this initialism is enough as a form of apology for not getting back right away to a friend who texted you.

    • Besh, SLR. Na empty bat ako kanina.
      “Hey girl, sorry if I replied just now. My phone died earlier.”

    9- Besh

    Since we’re at it, let’s talk about the word besh (sometimes beshie). The expression is simply a variant of the word bes, a word Filipinos use as a shortened form for “best friend.” Keep in mind that this expression is mostly used by females and very seldomly by males.

    If you’re a male, we recommend that you use the expression pare or ‘tol instead. While pare is Tagalog for “buddy” or “dude,” ‘tol is the contraction of the Tagalog word utol, which itself is short for kaputol, meaning “sibling.”

    Anyway, here’s another sentence using the word besh.

    • Hi, besh! Kamusta ka na? Kailan tayo kakain dun sa bagong Korean restaurant?
      “Hey, girl! How are you? When are we visiting that new Korean restaurant?”

    10- Kyah

    Kyah is a modern Filipino slang for kuya, which is Filipino for “big brother.” It can also be used to mean “sir,” and is used to refer to a male seller.

    • Kyah, magkano po ang smartwatch?
      “How much is the smartwatch, sir?”


    3. When Shopping Online

    Computer Sentences

    With the global phenomenon that online shopping has become, it’s not very uncommon nowadays to see people selling things on social media. Filipinos, in particular, have taken advantage of this sensation and have themselves come up with their own set of online shopping expressions.

    1- HM

    HM is short for “How much?” Instead of typing the entire phrase, Pinoy online shoppers simply say HM when inquiring about the price of a certain product. On social sites like Facebook, for instance, you’ll often find the comment section of a particular item for sale flooded with HM from different users.

    2- PM is the key

    The next time you decide to sell that old sweater you’ve been wanting to get rid of for some time now and someone messages you with HM, you respond with “PM is the key.” PM is short for “Personal Message,” and it’s used to convey the fact that you want to keep the transaction private, and don’t want to disclose the price of the item in public.

    • Buyer: Hi po. HM po ang sweater?
      “Hi! How much for the sweater?”
    • You: PM is the key.
      “Send me a private message for more details.”

    3- LP

    You’re browsing online for a pair of boots and you find just the exact pair you’ve been looking for. The price is a tad bit higher than what you can afford, though. What do you do? You click that private message button and type in LP? Of course, LP here doesn’t stand for “Long Playing,” which is another word for “album.” It stands for “lowest price,” and is an expression used for bargaining.

    • Hi po. LP po ng boots?
      “Hi. What’s the lowest price you’d accept for the pair of boots?”

    4- SKL/FKL

    SKL is short for Share ko lang. This expression is commonly used on social media whenever you want to share something online, such as important news, an update regarding a particular hobby, or just about anything you believe people will find interesting. It’s not necessarily an online shopping term, but a lot of people use it when sharing items they’ve bought online.

    • SKL bago kong halaman na binili ko kahapon.
      “Allow me to share this new plant I bought yesterday.”

    FKL, on the other hand, stands for Flex ko lang. Flex is a slang term meaning “to show off.” It’s like when you want to show off your muscles by flexing them.

    Pinoys usually use this Filipino internet slang by saying, Flex ko lang (insert anything you want to share here).
    It works the same way as SKL.

    • Flex ko lang itong bago kong Jordan shoes.
      “Allow me to ‘flex’ my new pair of Jordans.”
    • Check our entry on the top 20 words you’ll need when using the internet.


    4. Online Gaming Language

    Texting Slang

    The Philippine online gaming industry has constantly been on the rise in the last decade, and is forecasted to continue growing. Along with its rise is, of course, the need to invent online gaming language, which is exactly what Filipinos did.

    1- Dot-Dot

    Dot-dot is the Tagalog slang for DOTA, or Defense of the Ancients, a multiplayer online game that first came out in 2003 and eventually became the go-to video game of many Filipinos, young and old alike. Unless you’re a DOTA player yourself, you probably won’t encounter this word a lot—but if you are, then it’s one of those Pinoy slang words you need to familiarize yourself with.

    • Dot-dot pa more! Bagsak ka tuloy sa exam!

    This is a sarcastic way of telling a person that he failed his test because of spending more time playing the popular video game rather than studying.

    Dot-dot Pa More!

    2- Rak na itu!

    This expression means “Let’s rock!” It’s a kind of battlecry, motivating oneself and one’s team members to do their best, while at the same time not forgetting to have fun. It’s also another way of saying, “This is gonna be fun!”

    3- Rapsi

    The term rapsi is an alternative of the word rapsa, which is the Tagalog slang word for sarap (”delicious”). It’s an expression often used after gaining anything in the game that’s significant, such as an upgrade, a kill, or a special item.

    • Rapsi nitong bagong armor ko!
      “This new armor tastes good!”

    4- Ge

    Ge is short for sige, which means “sure” or “go ahead.” It’s something you say when you’re agreeing with someone about something. When invited to go on a quest, for instance, you say ge if you want to come.

    • Gamer Friend: ‘Tol, teammates tayo.
      “Hey, man. Let’s be teammates.”
    • You: Ge.
      “Sure.”

    5- Kati

    Kati is the Tagalog word for “itchy,” and is used to describe a challenging opponent or quest. When faced with an opponent that produces high damage, for instance, you say:

    • Ang kati naman nito.
      “This guy’s tough!”

    6- FTW

    This is one popular internet slang word, so chances are that you’ve seen it floating around several times already. It’s an acronym for the expression, “For the win,” which was first used in the 60s American game show Hollywood Squares.

    Today, online gamers use it after they’ve won a game, especially when they do it for a team. You can also use it when you’re inches away from victory. And it’s not only for gaming. You can also use it if you’re nearing the completion of a project you’ve been working hard on and wanted to share online.

    7- GG

    Always end a game in good spirits. Win or lose, never forget to say, “GG” after a game. It means “Good game.”

      Do you know that playing games can help you learn faster? This post will show you the reasons why.


    5. Multi-Layered Slang Words

    And then there are multi-layered slang words, those Tagalog millennial words that need the likes of Sherlock Holmes to decrypt. The following Filipino millennial slang words highlight the genius of Filipino millennials when it comes to inventing new terms and expressions. Just a warning: Some of the words may be confusing at first. But you’ll eventually get the hang of it.

    1- SHARKS

    Sharks are basically marine animals, portrayed as fearsome creatures waiting for a swimmer to devour. But this isn’t that kind of shark. Sharks as an expression means “Let me see.” The connection isn’t clear at first, but here’s the explanation. The English word “shark” is translated as pating in Tagalog. “Let me see,” or “Can I see,” on the other hand, is patingin. Remove the last two letters and you’re left with pating, which in English is “shark.” Clever, ain’t it?

    • Malamang maganda ang bagong phone mo. Sharks!
      “There’s no doubt your new phone is to die for. Let me see!”

    Definitely Not the Shark I’m Talking About!

    2- SALT

    We all know salt as a condiment, but when it comes to popular internet slang words in Tagalog, salt means “as in.” The explanation is pretty simple. The Tagalog word for “salt” is asin, which sounds like “as in.”

    • Nakakahilo ang mga bagong millennial words ngayon. Salt!
      “This millennial talk is making me dizzy. As in!”

    3- SAGS

    Let’s go to Filipino tropical fruits this time. Whenever you hear someone use the expression SAGS, they’re implying that something is “forced” or “unnatural,” which in Tagalog is pilit. But what’s the connection? Well, sags is actually short for saging, which is the Tagalog word for “banana.” And what do you do with a piece of banana? Simple. You “peel it.” Get it? Peel it? Pilit? Oh well.

    • Huwag naman masyadong sags ang ngiti mo.
      “You don’t need to force your smile.”

    4- SCOOBS

    If you’re a 90s kid, or what Pinoys would refer to as Batang 90s, then you’re definitely familiar with Scooby Doo, the talking Great Dane who helps four teenagers solve mysteries involving the supernatural (or not so supernatural, really, if you know what I mean).

    Well, the expression scoobs made its way to Millennial language because of him. When a Filipino teenager says scoobs, he’s actually saying “Hell no” or “Can’t be.” Here’s how that happened. Scooby Doo is a Great Dane, right? “Dane” sounds like dein or dehin, which is a slang word for hindi, which in Tagalog means “no” or “not.”

    Here’s how to use one of the most popular Filipino slang words:

    • Pupunta ka ba sa U2 concert?
      “Are you going to that U2 concert?”

      Scoobs, bro! Alaws arep.
      “I can’t, man. My budget isn’t enough.”

    Alaws, by the way, is slang for wala, which means “none,” while arep is slang for pera, which is the Tagalog word for “money.”

    I know. Please bear with me. We have one last word to decipher.

    5- GUMPS

    This word sounds like goosebumps, or worse, a name for some kind of disease. But, in reality, it simply means “thank you.” How did that happen? “Gumps” came from the word “Gump,” as in Forrest Gump. Yes, that 90s film that starred Tom Hanks. And Tom Hanks is T. Hanks. And T. Hanks is…you got it…thanks!

    • Ang ganda ng suot mo!
      “Your dress is beautiful!”

      Talaga? Gumps!
      “Really? Thanks!”

    Woman Looking Over Partner’s Shoulder While He Texts


    6. Ease the Confusion with FilipinoPod101

    It’s one thing to learn a new language, and it’s another thing to learn a new language within that new language you’re trying to learn. Wow! Even I got confused with that one! But hey, with FilipinoPod101, you can ease the confusion as you study Internet slang words in Filipino.

    FilipinoPod101 isn’t your ordinary language-learning system. It provides students with new lessons regularly, so that whether it’s key Filipino phrases or conversation techniques you want to know more about, you can rest assured that there’s a fresh lesson for you to learn.

    So, what are you waiting for? Sign up with FilipinoPod101 and gain access to exclusive Tagalog lessons, as well as useful blog articles like this one.

    And before we forget, please don’t hesitate to share your thoughts with us in the comments section! What are popular internet and text slang words in your own language?

    Until next time!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Talking Online in Filipino

    Refine Your Tagalog Skills with These Filipino TV Shows

    Thumbnail

    The television was first introduced to the Philippines in 1953, making the country the first in Southeast Asia (and second in Asia) to welcome what would be referred to by many as the “boob tube” or the “goggle box.” It was ABS-CBN, the leading TV network in the country today, that first gave the television to the Filipino people. Since then, watching Filipino TV shows has been one of the country’s most favorite pastimes, with Filipino families spending a huge chunk of their day in front of the small screen. Even with the advent of the internet and online streaming sites, it can’t be denied that television remains the go-to media platform for consuming content for many Filipinos.

    Over the years, we’ve read articles and heard news saying that television is an anti-education tool and that it has many negative effects. While there is some truth in that, there may also be a few redeeming factors to television-watching. For language-learners, in particular, perhaps the most important benefit of watching TV is that it improves reading speed and comprehension, simultaneously providing exposure to other cultures.

    Watching TV shows that use the language you’re trying to learn won’t automatically make you an expert in that language, but it sure can bring your skills up another level. For one, it gives you the opportunity to listen to unfamiliar words over and over again. The more you hear how words are supposed to be pronounced, the more familiar you become with them and the more your speaking confidence grows.

    The good news is that there are a number of different Filipino TV shows that provide you with the opportunities listed above. Let’s take a look at ten of the top Filipino TV programs you can watch to help you refine your Tagalog while also learning about Filipino culture.

    Ready? Here’s our Filipino TV shows list for Tagalog learners!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

    Table of Contents

    1. Maalaala Mo Kaya (MMK)
    2. Maynila
    3. Wansapanataym
    4. Pepito Manaloto
    5. Matanglawin
    6. Kapuso Mo, Jessica Soho
    7. Unang Hirit
    8. Umagang Kay Ganda
    9. Bandila
    10. Biyahe ni Drew
    11. How FilipinoPod101 Can Help


    1. Maalaala Mo Kaya (MMK)

    Maalaala Mo Kaya (abbreviated as MMK) is the longest-running drama anthology series in the Philippines, and in the entire world. It first aired in 1991 and centers on real-life stories of common Filipino people. The title translates to “would you remember,” with each episode chronicling the life of letter senders, depicted by some of the best Filipino drama actors and actresses.

    It’s most famous line is, of course, “Dear Charo,” by the host Charo Santos-Concio, who is the show’s presenter.

    This Filipino TV drama series is presented in Tagalog, and you can expect to hear rare Tagalog words from time to time. Also expect to be moved by the actors’ and actresses’ touching performances. You may have watched tons of drama series all your life, but you can rest assured that nothing comes close to this one.

      → How well you remember things determines how quickly you can learn a new language.


    2. Maynila

    You’ll greatly appreciate this drama romance anthology if you’re residing in Manila. This TV show, broadcast by GMA Network, was originally hosted by former Manila Mayor Lito Atienza from 1998 to March this year. Today, his daughter takes his place as the program’s host.

    What’s great about this Filipino TV show is that it shows the audience a glimpse of the Filipino culture, as the scenes are sometimes shot in famous Filipino heritage spots. The show’s intro, for instance, highlights some famous tourist spots such as the Luneta Park. You’ll also see shots of calesas (horse-drawn calash), a bangka (native watercraft in the Philippines), and jeepneys (the most popular mode of transportation ubiquitous in the streets of Manila).

    Most importantly, the series highlights inspiring stories of Pinoys who face the challenges most common to Manileños.

    Oh, and here’s the lyrics to the show’s soundtrack:

    Mahal kong Maynila
    “My dear Manila”

    Sayo’y hindi mawawalay
    “With you will never part”

    Maynila
    “Manila”

    Pangarap ko’y mabubuhay
    “My dream will come alive”

    Paglingap na walang kapantay
    “Care that is unparalleled”

    Sakaling ako’y lumayo
    “If ever I go away”

    Sayo’y mananabik
    “Surely, you I will miss”

    Walang iba sa puso ko kung ‘di Maynila
    “There is no one else in my heart but Manila”

    Maynila, Maynila
    “Manila, Manila”


    3. Wansapanataym

    You’re probably wondering why the title of the show sounds like “once upon a time.” Well, that’s because it’s a Filipinization of that exact phrase.

    Launched in 1997, Wansapanataym is actually a Filipino fantasy anthology for kids. Filipino kids couldn’t wait for the weekend and would get especially excited when Saturday came because it was Wansapanataym once again. This was one of those classic Filipino TV shows that stole its audience’s heart.

    The series aired from 1997 to 2005. It had a revival in 2010, but once again ended in April 2019. The good news is that old episodes are aired on Yey! Channel and Jeepney TV.

    In 1999, a movie adaptation was released. It told the story of an orphan girl named Anna (played by then-child actress Shaina Magdayao). With the help of her guardian angel, she was able to see her father (played by award-winning actor Christopher de Leon), albeit for a short moment.

      Here’s the official trailer to Wansapanataym: The Movie


    4. Pepito Manaloto

    Pepito Manaloto is your typical rags-to-riches story. The show stars Pepito (played by Michael V., dubbed “The King of Filipino Parody”), a simple, underprivileged man who was lucky enough to win P700 Million in the lottery.

    The show was tagged as a reality-sitcom, not because it was an actual reality show, but because it accurately depicted the life of a typical poor Filipino. It’s a big hit here in the Philippines simply because a lot of Filipinos could relate to the struggles of the protagonist, and like him, desire to get out of poverty.

    Pepito’s last name is actually a portmanteau of the words Manalo ( “win” ) and Lotto (”lottery”).

    The show isn’t filled with only life lessons, but with lessons for those who wish to take their Tagalog-speaking skills up a notch.

      Here’s one of the episodes of the multi-award-winning TV show seven years after its launch in 2010.


    5. Matanglawin

    Literally “Hawk’s Eye,” Matanglawin is an educational show hosted by Kim Atienza, and it airs weekly as one of the ABS-CBN Filipino TV shows. And in case you’re wondering, Kuya Kim, as he’s fondly known, is the son of Lito Atienza, the former mayor of Manila and former show host of the TV series Maynila.

    The show focuses on science-environmental issues, with Kuya Kim exploring the country for fresh insights, new discoveries, and interesting trivia. He encourages his viewers to be just like a hawk when it comes to investigating—Mapanuri, Mapagmatiyag, Mapangahas! (”Inquisitive, Vigilant, Adventurous!”). And yes, whether you want to learn more about science’s latest discoveries or improve your skills in Tagalog grammar and pronunciation, you’ll definitely benefit a lot from watching this multi-award-winning Filipino TV series!

      Since we’re talking about language, here’s an episode of Matanglawin where Kuya Kim gives us
      some trivia about the ancient writing script of the Philippines—the Baybayin.

      Did you know that FilipinoPod101 comes with a free app designed to help you learn Tagalog faster? Check the app here to find out more.


    6. Kapuso Mo, Jessica Soho

    The show’s international title is One at Heart, Jessica Soho, although it literally translates to Your Heartmate, Jessica Soho. Abbreviated and more popularly known as KMSJ, Kapuso Mo, Jessica Soho is an award-winning TV news magazine show that was first aired by GMA in 2004.

    The show is hosted by Jessica Soho—a multi-award-winning broadcast journalist—and highlights fascinating stories on current and trending news and events. Millions of Filipinos across the Philippines wait for this show in anticipation every Sunday at eight-forty in the evening. What makes KMJS one of the best Filipino TV shows today is simply that it captivates the hearts of its viewers. A magazine-type TV show, KMJS doesn’t just entertain its audience, but informs them of things they may already know but don’t usually talk about.

    If you want to stay up-to-date with the latest Filipino news while keeping your language skills sharp, this is definitely one of the Filipino educational TV shows you should watch.

      → Here’s an interesting episode of KMJS about the importance of learning the language Millennials speak, shown a couple of years ago


    7. Unang Hirit

    Are you an early bird? If yes, then Unang Hirit is the show for you. Unang Hirit literally means “First Strike.” The morning newscast goes live at four fifty-five in the morning and is GMA Network’s way of jumpstarting the day.

    Hosted by the country’s top TV journalists of today (Arnold Clavio, Suzie-Entrata Abrera, Ivan Mayrina, and Mariz Umali, to name a few) Unang Hirit knows just what trending news to collect and share with the public. The field journalists, in particular, know what’s actually going on in the country and can confirm and add valuable information to issues being discussed in the studio.

    Unang Hirit turned twenty on December 6, 2019. As the country’s longest-running morning show, it’s one of the top current Filipino TV shows to watch as you start your day.

      → Want to improve your time-reading skills in Filipino? Check out this lesson straight from our FilipinoPod101 page.

    Unang Hirit’s news segment is called Unang Balita (”First News”). You can catch this show on Live Stream on the GMA News YouTube channel.


    8. Umagang Kay Ganda

    Umagang Kay Ganda (UKG) is Unang Hirit’s counterpart and is broadcast by ABS-CBN. It literally means “a morning so beautiful,” and true to its title, it is indeed one of those Tagalog news programs that gives you a reason to thank God for another day, every day.

    The show premiered in 2007 and has become the network’s longest-running morning show.

    Just like GMA’s Unang Hirit, UKG rolls out news headlines from the previous day.

    What makes UKG unique, though, is the interaction and participation of the audience. And then there’s the lively and fun on-air discussions by the hosts Anthony Taberna, Amy Perez, Winnie Cordero, Ariel Ureta, Tina Marasigan, and Gretchen Ho. There’s no doubt you’ll learn a thing or two about Tagalog just by watching and listening to the exchanges by these extraordinary Pinoy TV journalists!

      → Did you know that UKG was awarded just recently with ‘Best Educational Morning TV Program’ in the first-ever College of Education Mass Media Choice Award of the University of Batangas? Here’s the video.


    9. Bandila

    If you’re a night owl, Bandila should be a great option for you. It’s a late-night (the show starts at eleven-ten p.m.) newscast presented by ABS-CBN and hosted by TV anchors Karen Davila and Julius Babao.

    Bandila is Tagalog for “flag,” and as you might guess, one of the aims of the program is to take on issues that take place wherever the Filipino flag is being represented.

    The show takes on the hottest issues of the day, with the hosts adding their own perspective and analysis to them.

    One of the most unique segments of the program is Selfie Balita ( “Selfie News” ) wherein viewers are given the opportunity to film their own reports.

    Here’s an episode of Bandila which aired during 2019’s holiday season, featuring Filipinos’ creativity in carving fruits and vegetables into Christmas ornaments.

      → A country’s national flag is its way of portraying its people and culture to the rest of the world. If you’re studying the Filipino language, it’s crucial that you’re aware of words and phrases associated with the Philippine flag.


    10. Biyahe ni Drew

    Anyone visiting the Philippines and learning the Tagalog language shouldn’t miss GMA Network’s Biyahe ni Drew. The show is hosted by actor and show host Drew Arellano, winner of three “Best Travel Host” awards for two different television travel shows.

    According to its YouTube channel description, the show is “a travel show in the Philippines that takes its viewers on a budget-friendly adventure.”

    Indeed, Biyahe ni Drew is filled not only with travel hacks, but with bucket list ideas and tips on how you can save money when traveling not only in the Philippines but also in international destinations.

    If you want to see some of the most beautiful spots in the Philippines or abroad without leaving your room, and at the same time improve your Tagalog, Biyahe ni Drew is one of the best Filipino TV shows to watch.

    Watch this episode of Biyahe ni Drew where our guy, Drew Arellano,
    takes us with him to the sixth most visited city in Asia—Seoul, South Korea!


    11. How FilipinoPod101 Can Help

    Now you may be wondering how to watch Filipino TV shows in the first place.

    Most of the shows on this Filipino TV series list are still currently being broadcast by their respective TV networks in the Philippines. You don’t have to be in the country, though, to have access to these exciting and educational programs—they’re also available on The Filipino Channel or TFC Filipino TV. And in case you’ve missed an episode, don’t worry because most of these TV programs also have their own YouTube channels where you can check out episodes you’ve missed, as well as old episodes you want to revisit.

    Don’t think watching television is enough to enhance your Tagalog? Well, that’s the exact reason FilipinoPod101 is here. As a leading language-learning system, FilipinoPod101 provides learners with practical methods for studying Tagalog. That way, wherever you are in the Philippines—whether you’re commuting, enjoying a meal at a restaurant, or having a normal conversation with a friend—you can be confident that you’re speaking fluent Tagalog.

    Did you enjoy our list of top TV shows in the Philippines for Tagalog learners? Let us know in the comments section if you have more Filipino TV shows in mind that you think should be on this list as well!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

    How to Say I Love You in Filipino - Romantic Word List

    Do you often feel lonely and sad? Do you long for romance and are willing to do whatever it takes to meet that special person? Speaking another language could revolutionize your love life! So, why wait? Learning how to say ‘love’ in Filipino could be just what you need to find it.

    Or perhaps you were lucky, and have found your Filipino partner already. Fantastic! Yet, a cross-cultural relationship comes with unique challenges. Learning how to speak your lover’s language will greatly improve your communication and enhance the relationship. At FilipinoPod101, our team will teach you all the words, quotes and phrases you need to woo your Filipino lover with excellence! Our tutors provide personal assistance, with plenty of extra material available to make Filipino dating easy for you.

    Table of Contents

    1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date
    2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date
    3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary
    4. Filipino Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
    5. Filipino Quotes about Love
    6. Marriage Proposal Lines
    7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines
    8. Will Falling in Love Help You Learn Filipino Faster?

    Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to be a Good Lover in Filipino

    1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date

    So, you have met your Filipino love interest. Congratulations! Who knows where this could take you…?! However, the two of you have just met and you’re not ready to say the Filipino word for love just yet. Great, it is better to get to know him/her first. Wow your prospective love by using these Filipino date phrases to set up a spectacular first date.

    Filipino Date Phrases

    Would you like to go out to dinner with me?

    • Gusto mo bang lumabas at magdinner nang magkasama?

    The important question! In most cultures, this phrase indicates: ‘I’m romantically interested in you’. Flirting in Filipino is no different, so don’t take your date to Mcdonald’s!

    Are you free this weekend?

    • Libre ka ba sa katapusan ng linggo?

    This is a preamble to asking your love interest on a date. If you get an immediate ‘Yes’, that’s good news!

    Would you like to hang out with me?

    • Gusto mo bang lumabas nang magkasama?

    You like her/him, but you’re not sure if there’s chemistry. Ask them to hang out first to see if a dinner date is next.

    What time shall we meet tomorrow?

    • Anong oras tayo magkikita bukas?

    Set a time, and be sure to arrive early! Nothing spoils a potential relationship more than a tardy date.

    Where shall we meet?

    • Saan tayo magkikita?

    You can ask this, but also suggest a place.

    You look great.

    • Ang ganda mo.

    A wonderful ice breaker! This phrase will help them relax a bit - they probably took great care to look their best just for you.

    You are so cute.

    • Ang cute mo sobra.

    If the two of you are getting on really well, this is a fun, flirtatious phrase to use.

    What do you think of this place?

    • Anong masasabi mo sa lugar na ito?

    This another good conversation starter. Show off your Filipino language skills!

    Can I see you again?

    • Pwede ba kitang makitang muli?

    So the date went really well - don’t waste time! Make sure you will see each other again.

    Shall we go somewhere else?

    • Pwede ba tayong pumunta sa iba?

    If the place you meet at is not great, you can suggest going elsewhere. It is also a good question to follow the previous one. Variety is the spice of life!

    I know a good place.

    • May alam akong magandang puntahan.

    Use this with the previous question. However, don’t say if you don’t know a good place!

    I will drive you home.

    • Ipag-drive na kita pauwi.

    If your date doesn’t have transport, this is a polite, considerate offer. However, don’t be offended if she/he turns you down on the first date. Especially a woman might not feel comfortable letting you drive her home when the two of you are still basically strangers.

    That was a great evening.

    • Iyon ay magandang gabing magkasama.

    This is a good phrase to end the evening with.

    When can I see you again?

    • Kailan kita ulit makikita?

    If he/she replied ‘Yes’ to ‘Can I see you again?’, this is the next important question.

    I’ll call you.

    • Tatawagan kita.

    Say this only if you really mean to do it. In many cultures, this could imply that you’re keeping the proverbial backdoor open.

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    2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date

    You learned all the Filipino phrases to make a date - congratulations! Now you have to decide where to meet, which can be tricky. Discuss these options with your lover to gauge whether you like the same things. Check out romantic date ideas in Filipino below!

    Date Ideas in Filipino

    museum

    • museo

    If you’re looking for unique date ideas that are fun but won’t break the bank, museums are the perfect spot! You won’t be running out of things to say in the conversations.

    candlelit dinner

    • candlelit dinner

    A candlelit dinner is perhaps best to reserve for when the relationship is getting serious. It’s very intimate, and says: “Romance!” It’s a fantastic choice if you’re sure you and your date are in love with each other!

    go to the zoo

    • pumunta sa zoo

    This is a good choice for shy lovers who want to get the conversation going. Just make sure your date likes zoos, as some people dislike them. Maybe not for the first date, but this is also a great choice if your lover has children - you’ll win his/her adoration for inviting them along!

    go for a long walk

    • maglakad ng malayo nang magkasama

    Need to talk about serious stuff, or just want to relax with your date? Walking together is soothing, and a habit you can keep up together always! Just make sure it’s a beautiful walk that’s not too strenuous.

    go to the opera

    • pumunta sa opera

    This type of date should only be attempted if both of you love the opera. It can be a special treat, followed by a candlelit dinner!

    go to the aquarium

    • pumunta sa aquarium

    Going to the aquarium is another good idea if you need topics for conversation, or if you need to impress your lover’s kids! Make sure your date doesn’t have a problem with aquariums.

    walk on the beach

    • maglakad sa beach

    This can be a very romantic stroll, especially at night! The sea is often associated with romance and beauty.

    have a picnic

    • mag picnic

    If you and your date need to get more comfortable together, this can be a fantastic date. Spending time in nature is soothing and calms the nerves.

    cook a meal together

    • magluto ng pagkain nang magkasama

    If you want to get an idea of your date’s true character in one go, this is an excellent date! You will quickly see if the two of you can work together in a confined space. If it works, it will be fantastic for the relationship and create a sense of intimacy. If not, you will probably part ways!

    have dinner and see a movie

    • mag hapunan at manood ng pelikula

    This is traditional date choice works perfectly well. Just make sure you and your date like the same kind of movies!

    3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary

    Valentine's Day Words in Filipino

    Expressing your feelings honestly is very important in any relationship all year round. Yet, on Valentine’s Day you really want to shine. Impress your lover this Valentine’s with your excellent vocabulary, and make his/her day! We teach you, in fun, effective ways, the meanings of the words and how to pronounce them. You can also copy the characters and learn how to write ‘I love you’ in Filipino - think how impressed your date will be!

    4. Filipino Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day

    So, you now have the basic Valentine’s Day vocabulary under your belt. Well done! But, do you know how to say ‘I love you’ in Filipino yet? Or perhaps you are still only friends. So, do you know how to say ‘I like you’ or ‘I have a crush on you’ in Filipino? No? Don’t worry, here are all the love phrases you need to bowl over your Filipino love on this special day!

    Valentine's Day Words in Filipino

    I love you.

    • Mahal kita.

    Saying ‘I love you’ in Filipino carries the same weight as in all languages. Use this only if you’re sure and sincere about your feelings for your partner/friend.

    You mean so much to me.

    • Mahalaga ka para sa akin.

    This is a beautiful expression of gratitude that will enhance any relationship! It makes the receiver feel appreciated and their efforts recognized.

    Will you be my Valentine?

    • Maari bang ikaw ang aking maging aking Valentino/Valentina?

    With these words, you are taking your relationship to the next level! Or, if you have been a couple for a while, it shows that you still feel the romance. So, go for it!

    You’re so beautiful.

    • Napakaganda mo.

    If you don’t know how to say ‘You’re pretty’ in Filipino, this is a good substitute, gentlemen!

    I think of you as more than a friend.

    • Higit pa sa magkaibigan ang pagtingin ko sa iyo.

    Say this if you are not yet sure that your romantic feelings are reciprocated. It is also a safe go-to if you’re unsure about the Filipino dating culture.

    A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.

    • Kulang ang isang daang puso para lamanin ang pagibig ko para sa iyo.

    You romantic you…! When your heart overflows with love, this would be the best phrase to use.

    Love is just love. It can never be explained.

    • Ang pag-ibig ay pag-ibig lamang. Hindi ito kayang maipaliwanag.

    If you fell in love unexpectedly or inexplicably, this one’s for you.

    You’re so handsome.

    • Napakaguwapo mo.

    Ladies, this phrase lets your Filipino love know how much you appreciate his looks! Don’t be shy to use it; men like compliments too.

    I’ve got a crush on you.

    • May gusto ako sa iyo.

    If you like someone, but you’re unsure about starting a relationship, it would be prudent to say this. It simply means that you like someone very, very much and think they’re amazing.

    You make me want to be a better man.

    • Dahil sa iyo, ninanais kong maging mas mabuting tao.

    Gentlemen, don’t claim this phrase as your own! It hails from the movie ‘As Good as it Gets’, but it is sure to make your Filipino girlfriend feel very special. Let her know that she inspires you!

    Let all that you do be done in love.

    • Hayaan mong ang lahat ng iyong gagawin ay magawa sa ngalan ng pag-ibig.

    We hope.

    You are my sunshine, my love.

    • Ikaw ang araw sa aking buhay, aking giliw.

    A compliment that lets your lover know they bring a special quality to your life. Really nice!

    Words can’t describe my love for you.

    • Hindi kayang ilarawan ng mga salita ang pag-ibig ko para sa iyo.

    Better say this when you’re feeling serious about the relationship! It means that your feelings are very intense.

    We were meant to be together.

    • Tayo ay nakatadhana para sa isa’t isa.

    This is a loving affirmation that shows you see a future together, and that you feel a special bond with your partner.

    If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you’re definitely in love.

    • Kung may tao kang nasasaisip habang binabasa mo ito, siguradong ikaw ay in-love.

    Here’s something fun to tease your lover with. And hope he/she was thinking of you!

    5. Filipino Quotes about Love

    Filipino Love Quotes

    You’re a love champ! You and your Filipino lover are getting along fantastically, your dates are awesome, your Valentine’s Day together was spectacular, and you’re very much in love. Good for you! Here are some beautiful phrases of endearment in Filipino that will remind him/her who is in your thoughts all the time.

    6. Marriage Proposal Lines

    Filipino Marriage Proposal Lines

    Wow. Your Filipino lover is indeed the love of your life - congratulations! And may only happiness follow the two of you! In most traditions, the man asks the woman to marry; this is also the Filipino custom. Here are a few sincere and romantic lines that will help you to ask your lady-love for her hand in marriage.

    7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines

    Filipino Break-Up Lines

    Instead of moving towards marriage or a long-term relationship, you find that the spark is not there for you. That is a pity! But even though breaking up is never easy, continuing a bad or unfulfilling relationship would be even harder. Remember to be kind to the person you are going to say goodbye to; respect and sensitivity cost nothing. Here are some phrases to help you break up gently.

  • We need to talk.
    • Kailangan natin magusap.

    This is not really a break-up line, but it is a good conversation opener with a serious tone.

    It’s not you. It’s me.

    • Hindi ikaw. Ako.

    As long as you mean it, this can be a kind thing to say. It means that there’s nothing wrong with your Filipino lover as a person, but that you need something different from a relationship.

    I’m just not ready for this kind of relationship.

    • Hindi pa ako handa para sa ganitong klase ng relasyon.

    Things moved a bit fast and got too intense, too soon? Painful as it is, honesty is often the best way to break up with somebody.

    Let’s just be friends.

    • Maging magkaibigan na lang tayo.

    If the relationship was very intense, and you have sent many ‘i love u’ texts in Filipino, this would not be a good breakup line. Feelings need to calm down before you can be friends, if ever. If the relationship has not really developed yet, a friendship would be possible.

    I think we need a break.

    • Sa tingin ko kailangan nating lumayo muna.

    This is again honest, and to the point. No need to play with someone’s emotions by not letting them know how you feel. However, this could imply that you may fall in love with him/her again after a period of time, so use with discretion.

    You deserve better.

    • Nararapat kang makakilala ng mas higit pa sa akin.

    Yes, he/she probably deserves a better relationship if your own feelings have cooled down.

    We should start seeing other people.

    • Dapat na nating umpisahang makipagkita sa ibang mga tao.

    This is probably the least gentle break-up phrase, so reserve it for a lover that doesn’t get the message!

    I need my space.

    • Kailangan ko ng space.

    When a person is too clingy or demanding, this would be an suitable break-up phrase. It is another good go-to for that lover who doesn’t get the message!

    I think we’re moving too fast.

    • Sa tingin ko medyo mabilis yata ang takbo ng ating relasyon.

    Say this if you want to keep the relationship, but need to slow down its progress a bit. It is also good if you feel things are getting too intense for your liking. However, it is not really a break-up line, so be careful not to mislead.

    I need to focus on my career.

    • Kailangan kong mag-focus sa aking career.

    If you feel that you will not be able to give 100% in a relationship due to career demands, this is the phrase to use. It’s also good if you are unwilling to give up your career for a relationship.

    I’m not good enough for you.

    • Hindi ako sapat para sa iyo.

    Say this only if you really believe it, or you’ll end up sounding false. Break-ups are usually hard for the receiving party, so don’t insult him/her with an insincere comment.

    I just don’t love you anymore.

    • Hindi na kita mahal ngayon.

    This harsh line is sometimes the best one to use if you are struggling to get through to a stubborn, clingy lover who won’t accept your break up. Use it as a last resort. Then switch your phone off and block their emails!

    We’re just not right for each other.

    • Hindi talaga tayo nararapat para sa isa’t-isa.

    If this is how you truly feel, you need to say it. Be kind, gentle and polite.

    It’s for the best.

    • Para ito sa ikabubuti ng lahat.

    This phrase is called for if circumstances are difficult and the relationship is not progressing well. Love should enhance one’s life, not burden it!

    We’ve grown apart.

    • Nagkahiwalay na ang loob natin.

    Cross-cultural relationships are often long-distance ones, and it is easy to grow apart over time.

  • 8. Will Falling in Love help you Learn Filipino faster?

    Most people will agree that the above statement is a no-brainer - of course it will! Your body will be flooded with feel-good hormones, which are superb motivators for anything. FilipinoPod101 is one of the best portals to help help make this a reality, so don’t hesitate to enroll now! Let’s quickly look at the reasons why falling in love will speed up your learning of the Filipino language.

    Three Reasons Why Having a Lover will Help you Learn Filipino Faster!

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    1- Being in a love relationship with your Filipino speaking partner will immerse you in the culture
    FilipinoPod101 uses immersive methods and tools to teach you Filipino, but having a relationship with a native speaker will be a very valuable addition to your learning experience! You will gain exposure to their world, realtime and vividly, which will make the language come alive even more for you. The experience is likely to expand your world-view, which should motivate you to learn Filipino even faster.

    2- Having your Filipino romantic partner will mean more opportunity to practice speaking
    Nothing beats continuous practice when learning a new language. Your partner will probably be very willing to assist you in this, as your enhanced Filipino language skills will enhance the relationship. Communication is, after all, one of the most important pillars of a good partnership. Also, you will get to impress your lover with the knowledge gained through your studies - a win/win situation!

    3- A supportive Filipino lover is likely to make a gentle, patient teacher and study aid!
    With his/her heart filled with love and goodwill for you, your Filipino partner is likely to patiently and gently correct your mistakes when you speak. This goes not only for grammar, but also for accent and meaning. With his/her help, you could sound like a native in no time!

    Three Reasons Why FilipinoPod101 helps you learn Filipino Even Faster when you’re In Love

    Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to be a Good Lover in Filipino

    1- All the Resources and Materials Will Help Both of You
    Falling in love with a man or woman speaking Filipino is an opportunity for both of you to learn a new language! For this reason, every lesson, transcript, vocabulary list, and resource at FilipinoPod101 is translated into both English and Filipino. So, while your partner can help you learn Filipino faster, you can potentially also help him/her learn and master English!

    2- Lessons Are Designed to Help You Understand and Engage with Filipino Culture
    At FilipinoPod101, our focus is to help our students learn practical vocabulary and phrases used by everyday people in Philippines. This means that, from your very first lesson, you can apply what you learn immediately! So, when your Filipino partner wants to go out to a restaurant, play Pokemon Go, or attend just about any social function, you have the vocabulary and phrases necessary to have a great time!

    3- Access to Special Resources Dedicated to Romantic Filipino Phrases
    You now have access to FilipinoPod101’s specially-developed sections and tools to teach you love words, phrases, and cultural insights to help you find and attract your Filipino soul mate. A personal tutor will assist you to master these brilliantly - remember to invite him/her to your wedding!

    How to Celebrate April Fools’ Day in Filipino

    How to Celebrate April Fools' Day in Filipino!

    Most everyone is familiar with this day, as it is celebrated nearly everywhere the world. Yet, when exactly is April Fools’ Day? And where did April Fools come from? April Fools’ Day is observed on April 1st every year. This day of jokes and pranks is believed to have stemmed from the 16th-century calendar change in France, when New Year’s Day was moved from April 1 to January 1. This action was taken due to the adoption of the Gregorian calendar.

    However, a few people were resistant to the calendar change, so they continued to observe New Year’s Day on April 1st, rather than the new date. They were referred to as the “April Fools”, and others started playing mocking tricks on them. This custom endured, and is practiced to this day around the world!

    Table of Contents

    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day
    2. Filipino Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day
    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody
    4. How Can FilipinoPod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?
    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Filipino - Testing New Technology

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    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day

    Do you want to know how to say April Fools’ Day in Filipino? Well, there are millions of ways and words, but here are the top one million Filipino words you really need to know! Simply click this link. Here are some of them you will find useful:

    1. joke - magbiro
    2. funny - nakakatawa
    3. lie - magsinungaling
    4. sneaky - mapanlinlang
    5. prankster - pilyo
    6. prank - kapilyuhan
    7. play a joke - lokohin ang isang tao
    8. humor - katatawanan
    9. deceptive - mapanlinlang
    10. April 1st - ika-una ng Abril
    11. surprise - manggulat
    12. fool - loko

    2. Filipino Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day

    Filipino Phrases for April Fools' Day

    Don’t limit yourself to practical jokes - use these April Fools’ phrases in Filipino to prank your favorite Filipino friend or colleague!

    1. I learned Filipino in 1 month.
      • Nag-aral ako ng Filipino sa loob ng isang buwan.
    2. All classes for today got canceled.
      • Lahat ng klase ngayong araw na ‘to ay nakansela.
    3. I’m sorry, but I’ve just broken your favorite pair of glasses.
      • Sorry, pero nasira ko ang paborito mong pares ng salamin sa mata.
    4. Someone has just hit your car.
      • May kakabangga lang sa kotse mo.
    5. I’m getting married.
      • Magpapakasal na ako.
    6. You won a free ticket.
      • Nanalo ka ng libreng tiket.
    7. I saw your car being towed.
      • Nakita kong tinotow ang kotse mo.
    8. They’re giving away free gift cards in front of the building.
      • Namimigay sila ng mga libreng gift card sa harap ng building.
    9. A handsome guy is waiting for you outside.
      • May gwapong lalaking naghihintay sa’yo sa labas.
    10. A beautiful lady asked me to give this phone number to you.
      • May isang magandang babaeng nagpapabigay nitong numero ng telepono sa’yo.
    11. Can you come downstairs? I have something special for you.
      • Pwede ka bang bumaba? Mayroon akong isang espesyal na bagay para sa’yo.
    12. Thank you for your love letter this morning. I never could have guessed your feelings.
      • Salamat para sa love letter kaninang umaga. Hindi ko kailanman maiisip na ganon pala ang iyong nararamdaman.

    Choose your victims carefully, though; the idea is to get them to laugh with you, not to hurt their feelings or humiliate them in front of others. Be extra careful if you choose to play a prank on your boss - you don’t want to antagonize them with an inappropriate joke.

    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody

    Choose Bad or Good

    Right, now that you know the top million April Fools’ words in Filipino, let’s look at some super pranks and tricks to play on friends, colleagues and family. Some April Fools ideas never grow old, while new ones are born every year.

    Never joke in such a way that it hurts anyone, or humiliates them badly in front of others - the idea is for everybody to laugh and enjoy the fun! Respect is still key, no matter what day of the year it is.

    Cockroach prank

    1- Infestation

    This trick is so simple, yet so creepy, it’s almost unbelievable. Take black paper, cut out the silhouette of a giant cockroach, a spider or another insect, and stick it inside the lampshade of a table lamp. When the lamp is switched on, it will look like a monstrous insect is sitting inside the lampshade. Or, get a whole lot of realistic-looking plastic insects, and spread them over a colleague’s desk and chair, or, at home, over the kids’ beds etc. Creep-factor: stellar.

    2- Which One Doesn’t Fit?

    Put the photo of a celebrity or a notorious politician in a frame, and take it to work on April Fools’ Day. Hang the photo on the staff picture wall, and wait. You’ll be surprised how long it can take for people to notice that one picture doesn’t fit.

    3- Something Weird in the Restroom

    At work, replace the air freshener in the restroom with something noxious like insect killer, oven cleaner or your own odious mixture in a spray bottle. Be sure to cover the bottle’s body so no one suspects a swap.

    Or paint a bar of soap with clear nail polish, and leave it at the hand wash basin. It will not lather.

    Or, if your workplace’s restroom has partitioned toilets with short doors, arrange jeans or trousers and shoes on all but one of the toilet covers, so it looks like every stall is occupied. Now wait for complaints, and see how long it takes for someone to figure out the April Fools’ Day prank. You’ll probably wish you had a camera inside the restroom. But, unless you don’t mind getting fired, don’t put your own recording device in there!

    Funny Face

    4- Call Me Funny

    Prepare and print out a few posters with the following instructions: Lion Roar Challenge! Call this number - 123-456-7890 - and leave your best lion’s roar as voicemail! Best roarer will be announced April 10 in the cafeteria. Prize: $100. (Lion’s roar is just an example; you can use any animal call, or even a movie character’s unique sound, such as Chewbacca from Star Wars. The weirder, the funnier. Obviously!) Put the posters up in the office where most of the staff is likely to see them. Now wait for the owner of the number to visit you with murderous intent. Have a conciliatory gift ready that’s not a prank.

    5- Minty Cookies

    This is another simple but hugely effective prank - simply separate iced cookies, scrape off the icing, and replace it with toothpaste. Serve during lunch or tea break at work, or put in your family’s lunch boxes. Be sure to take photos of your victim’s faces when they first bite into your April Fools’ cookies.

    6- Wild Shopping

    At your local grocer, place a realistic-looking plastic snake or spider among the fresh vegetables. Now wait around the corner for the first yell.

    7- The Oldest Trick in the Book

    Don’t forget probably the oldest, yet very effective April Fools’ joke in the book - smearing hand cream or Vaseline on a door handle that most staff, family or friends are likely to use. Yuck to the max!

    8- Sneeze On Me

    Another golden oldie is also gross, yet harmless and utterly satisfying as a prank. Fill a small spray bottle that you can easily conceal with water. Walk past a friend, colleague or one of your kids, and fake a sneeze while simultaneously spraying them with a bit of water. Expect to be called a totally disgusting person. Add a drop of lovely smelling essential oil to the water for extra confusion.

    9- Word Play Repairs

    Put a fresh leek in the hand wash basin at home or work, and then tell your housemates or colleagues this: “There’s a huge leak in the restroom/bathroom basin, it’s really serious. Please can someone go have a look?!” Expect exasperation and smiles all around. Note that this prank is only likely to work where people understand English well.

    10- Scary Face

    Print out a very scary face on an A4 sheet of paper, and place it in a colleague’s, or one of your kid’s drawers, so it’s the first thing they see when they open the drawer. You may not be very popular for a while.

    11- Wake Up To Madness

    Put foamy shaving cream, or real whipped cream on your hand, and wake your kid up by tickling their nose with it. As long as they get the joke, this could be a wonderful and fun way to start April Fools’ Day.

    Computer Prank

    12- Computer Prank

    This one’s fabulous, if you have a bit of time to fiddle with a colleague, friend or your kid’s computer. It is most effective on a computer where most of the icons they use are on the desktop background itself (as opposed to on the bottom task bar).

    Take and save a screenshot of their desktop with the icons. Set this screenshot as their background image. Now delete all the working icons. When they return to their computer, wait for the curses when no amount of clicking on the icons works.

    13- Monster Under the Cup

    This one will also work well anywhere people meet. Take a paper cup, and write the following on it in black pen: “Danger! Don’t lift, big spider underneath.” Place it upside-down on prominent flat surface, such as a kitchen counter, a colleague’s desk or a restaurant table. Expect some truly interesting responses.

    Door Prank

    14- Prank Door

    Write in large letters on a large and noticeable piece of paper: PUSH. Tape this notice on a door that should be pulled to open, and watch the hilarious struggle of those clever souls who actually read signs.

    4. How Can FilipinoPod101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?

    If you happen to visit Philippines, or if you work for any Filipino company, knowing the above Filipino prankster phrases can really lighten up your day. Showing you have a sense of humor can go a long way to cement good relationships in any situation. These phrases are at your disposal for free, as well as are these 100 core Filipino words, which you will learn how to pronounce perfectly.

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    Also, don’t stop at learning April Fools’ phrases in Filipino - bone up your Filipino language skills with these FREE key phrases. Yes, FilipinoPod101 doesn’t joke when it comes to effective, fun and easy learning.

    Now, as a bonus, test our super-learning technology, and learn the Top 1000 most useful phrases in Filipino below! But that’s not all. Read on to learn how you can be eligible for large enrollment discounts at FilipinoPod101.

    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Filipino - testing new technology

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