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A Guide to Delivering the Perfect Compliment in Tagalog

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Knowing how to give the right compliment is a skill. In a country like the Philippines, where many people seem to find receiving compliments unnerving or awkward, it’s especially important to learn how to express praise or admiration without coming across as sarcastic. And that’s what this post is all about—learning how to deliver the perfect compliment in Tagalog.

To be honest, Pinoys aren’t really good at receiving compliments. We’re somewhat modest and very shy when it comes to claiming things we’re good at. Most of us even consider suspicion as an accepted mode of receiving compliments. It must have something to do with trust issues, but regardless, it can’t be denied that giving and receiving compliments is not a forte of many Filipinos.

The good news is that times are a-changin’, and nowadays, if you know the right words to say to praise or admire a Filipino friend, you can expect some love and appreciation in return. In connection with that, we’ve compiled twenty-one Filipino compliments that will surely make your Pinoy friends feel good and love having you around all the time.

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Table of Contents

  1. Complimenting Someone’s Look
  2. Complimenting Someone’s Work
  3. Complimenting Someone’s Skills
  4. How to Make Your Compliments Sound More Sincere
  5. What to Expect After Giving Compliments
  6. Learn to Craft the Perfect Tagalog Compliments with FilipinoPod101

1. Complimenting Someone’s Look

Compliments

Studies show that Pinoys are more conscious than ever about their appearance. This was one of the main findings of the Men Revolution 2013 study done by an international company that provided consumer insight. This is accurate, since most Filipinos, particularly men, are very particular about the way they look and smell; they believe that both factors play an important role in their career. Here are several ways you can compliment a Filipino friend on the way he or she looks.

1- Astig ang porma mo ah!

The word astig is actually Tagalog for “tough,” although in many cases, it’s used to refer to something cool or awesome.

When to use it: A friend comes along and you notice that he’s especially fashionable today. You greet him and say: Uy, astig ang porma mo ngayon ah. (“You look cool, man.”)

2- Ang pogi/ganda mo naman.

When to use it: You’re going to a party with a friend and you notice that she looks prettier than usual. You go ahead and say to her: Ang ganda mo naman. (“You’re looking pretty!”)

3- Bagay sa iyo ang suot mo.

The word bagay has two meanings in Tagalog, the first one being “thing” and the other one being “match.” In this case, we’re talking about the latter.

When to use it: It seems that your colleague has really spent some time fixing herself up, making sure every piece of her outfit matches well with the others. You show your appreciation to her by saying: Bagay sa’yo ‘yang suot mong blouse. (“That blouse looks perfect on you!”)

A Man and Woman Flirting During Autumn

Girl: Bagay ba? Boy: Oo, bagay…tayo. (Girl: “Perfect match, right?” Boy: “Indeed…we are.”)

4- “Blooming” ka ngayon ah.

Blooming is a Tagalog expression used to describe a person who’s especially happy, particularly as a result of being in a romantic relationship.

When to use it: Your friend came to work looking jollier than usual. Is she in love? You say: Mukhang ‘blooming’ ka ngayon ah? (“Your face seems to be glowing today.”)

5- Ang kinis ng pisngi mo!

When to use it: You’re impressed with your friend’s smooth skin and want to find out their secret. Without sounding too obvious, you compliment them instead: Ang kinis ng pisngi mo! (“You know what, you really have beautiful and healthy skin.”)

6- Sumiseksi ka yata!

When to use it: You noticed that your friend has been losing weight—and looking good because of it—for quite some time now. Not wanting to sound impolite, you simply say: Sumiseksi ka yata! (“I noticed you’re getting sexier every day!”)

Just make sure you’re not a married man saying this to a female colleague.

7- Marunong ka talagang pumili.

When to use it: You’re really amazed at your friend’s ability to mix and match clothes so that they look good in anything they wear. You tell your friend: Marunong ka talagang pumili ng mga isusuot mo. (“You really have good taste, you know?”)

A Man and Woman Shopping at the Mall Together

Marunong ka talagang pumili? (“You really have good taste, you know?”)

2. Complimenting Someone’s Work

Filipinos are no question some of the most hardworking people in the world. Perhaps it’s because of pride or modesty that Pinoys go out of their way to avoid being embarrassed, but regardless of the reasons, there’s no doubt that Pinoys will almost always do anything they can to add value to their work. Here are some Tagalog compliments you can use to show appreciation for your coworkers.

1- Ang galing mo ah.

When to use it: Your colleague did an exceptionally good job, so you go to him and say: Ang galing mo ah! (“You were pretty good back there!”)

2- Gusto ko yang ginawa mo.

When to use it: You find a teammate’s contribution really helpful. To show your appreciation, you say: Gusto ko ‘yang ginawa mo. Malaking tulong talaga ‘yan. (“I really like what you did. That will really help us big time.”)

3- Wow! Ang ganda ng gawa mo!

Gawa is Tagalog for “work,” “act,” or “deed.” In this context, it could refer to a masterpiece, such as handicraft, artwork, a song, a poem, or any similar project.

When to use it: This is just another version of the previous example. The only difference is that you’re really impressed this time: Wow! Ang ganda naman ng sinulat mong tula! (“Wow! This is a really great piece of poetry you’ve written!”)

4- Ipagpatuloy mo ‘yan ha.

When to use it: This can be used as a follow-up to the previous compliment: Gusto ko ‘yang ginawa mo. Ipagpatuloy mo ‘yan ha? (“I really like what you did there. Keep it up, okay?”)

5- Turuan mo naman ako.

When to use it: This is an indirect way to tell someone that they’re better than anyone else in the room. You kindly ask them to teach you how to do something that you’ve observed they’re very good at: Turuan mo naman akong sumayaw. (“Please teach me how to dance.”)

Two People Engaging in Martial Arts

Turuan niyo po ako, Sifu. (“Please teach me, Sifu.”)

6- Mahusay.

When to use it: A subordinate showed some impressive stuff at work. You respond accordingly by saying: Mahusay. (“Excellent!”) or Mahusay itong trabaho mo. (“You did an excellent job here.”)

7- Da best ka talaga!

This is like saying “You are amazing” in Tagalog. So, when do you use it?

When to use it: Once again, your colleague has shown that they can be trusted with stuff at work. You show your appreciation and amazement by saying: Da best ka talaga! (“You’re really the best at what you do!”)

3. Complimenting Someone’s Skills

Not only are Pinoys hardworking, but they’re also very skillful. In fact, there are dozens of Filipino animators who have made it big in Hollywood! When it comes to skilled work, Filipinos are exceptional—whether at home, in school, or in the workplace. Wondering how you can show appreciation for someone’s skills using compliments in Filipino? Here’s how.

1- Ang sarap nitong niluto mo!

When to use it: The way to a Filipino man’s heart is through his stomach. The way to a Filipina’s heart? Through a sincere compliment on her cooking (or her mom’s). Filipinos love inviting guests over to a meal. When you know you’re in for some delectable treat, show your appreciation by saying: Ang sarap nitong niluto mo! (“This is top-notch cooking!”)

People Eating

Ang sarap po ng luto niyo, mama…este…ma’am. (“This is top-notch cooking, mom…I mean, ma’am.”)

2- Ang galing mo na ah!

When to use it: Someone you know is showing obvious improvements on a craft they’re learning. You compliment them by saying: Ang galing mo ng mag Tagalog ah! (“I can see your Tagalog has improved.”)

3- Ang ganda talaga ng boses mo.

When to use it: A friend of yours once again showcases their singing skills. Captivated, you tell that friend: Alam mo, ang ganda talaga ng boses mo. (“You know what? Your voice is really good.”)

4- Saan ka natuto niyan?

When to use it: This is another indirect way to compliment a person. You find out that your friend is really good at calligraphy. You’re impressed and ask her where she learned the skill: Saan ka natuto mag-calligraphy? (“Where/How did you learn calligraphy?”)

5- Ikaw ba gumawa nito? Astig!

When to use it: You’re impressed at another person’s work, but you’re too shy to directly compliment them on it. You say: Ikaw ba gumawa nito? Astig! (“Is this your work? Cool!”)

6- Ang galing mo talagang magpatawa!

When to use it: You sincerely appreciate a friend’s sense of humor, so you say to him: Ang galing mo talagang magpatawa. (“You really have a great sense of humor, you know.”)

7- Bilib talaga ako sa’yo.

When to use it: You’re really impressed by the way your friend handles tough life situations. You compliment them by saying: Bilib talaga ako sa’yo. Hindi ka madaling sumuko. (“I’m really amazed at how well you handle things. You don’t easily give up.”)

4. How to Make Your Compliments Sound More Sincere

Positive Feelings

There’s nothing more repulsive than false flattery, but showing real appreciation can also be a challenge. This is especially true if you grew up in a household where giving and receiving praise wasn’t the norm. Yes, Pinoys can be gullible sometimes, but most can actually tell when they’re being genuinely appreciated. Here are practical tips on how to deliver heartfelt compliments in Tagalog.

1- Be authentic.

The most natural way to offer praise is to just be yourself. Even if you’re truly sincere, you might not come across that way if you’re giving a compliment and trying to impress the other person at the same time. The goal of giving a compliment is to make the other person feel good, and not the other way around. Before praising a colleague for a job well done, make sure you’re doing it because they deserve the praise and that you’re genuinely happy for them.

2- Don’t exaggerate.

When giving compliments, be sure to offer one that’s appropriate for the situation. That said, avoid overdoing things and giving a string of compliments when a simple statement of adoration is enough. Giving out a stream of flattering remarks might be a good way to establish that you’re a nice person, but it also has the danger of doing the opposite. Avoid giving a barrage of compliments to the same person, and be careful not to exaggerate things. The more words you say, the higher the chances they’ll lose their impact.

3- Be specific.

Broad compliments tend to be vague. Avoid any awkwardness by getting specific with your compliments. Instead of simply saying, Ang talino mo talaga (“You’re really smart”), say something like, Napahanga mo ako sa presentation mo sa meeting kanina (“I was impressed with your presentation during the meeting earlier”). The more specific your compliment, the more your recipient will treat it as legitimate.

4- Timing is everything.

An effective compliment involves proper timing. Telling a coworker how much you love his new jacket while you’re at the pantry relaxing over a cup of coffee is great. Doing so when he’s in the middle of a very important task? Not so.

5- Follow up with a gentle shoulder tap.

Don’t underestimate the power of physical touch when giving compliments. Sometimes, a gentle tap on the shoulder can say more about how you feel. But as mentioned, always consider time and place before doing so, as a friendly touch can have an unfavorable effect in the wrong situation.

Woman Swearing

Nagsasabi ako ng totoo. Peksman! (“I’m telling the truth. I promise!”)

5. What to Expect After Giving Compliments

As mentioned already, Filipinos aren’t used to receiving compliments, so don’t be surprised if someone you know blushes after you’ve complimented them.

Most Pinoys will even reply with suspicion: May kailangan ka, ‘no? (“So, what is it that you need this time?”), Hindi nga? (“Really?”)

What do you do when people aren’t so welcoming of your positive appraisal of them? Simply reassure them that you’re sincere: Hindi, totoo. Seryoso ako. (“No, really. I’m serious.”)

The good thing is that most Pinoys also know when you’re being sincere, so as long as you’re authentic, you have nothing to worry about. And when they say, “Thank you,” simply respond with a polite Walang anuman. (“You’re welcome.”)

    Speaking of polite, you might find this short video on Filipino manners really helpful.

6. Learn to Craft the Perfect Tagalog Compliments with FilipinoPod101

Learning how to give Filipino compliments is easier when you have someone teaching and guiding you. What we gave you here is just a quick guide on giving Filipino complimenting phrases. If you want to develop your skills further, there’s no better way to do so than with FilipinoPod101.com.

With FilipinoPod101, you’ll learn about so much more than compliments in Filipino. You’ll also get to know the Filipino culture a lot better, which will help you understand how to deal with Pinoys in social situations. FilipinoPod101 provides resources that will help you improve your Tagalog vocabulary, as well as your pronunciation and speaking skills. A lesson library where you can have access to practical tips is also available. For example, see our lessons on what survival phrases to use when traveling or when you’re caught in an emergency.

Need to master your Filipino a little bit faster? That’s where our Premium PLUS feature MyTeacher comes in. With Premium PLUS, you get access to more than 120 hours of audio and video courses and Tagalog study tools.

So, what do you think about our guide on giving the perfect compliment in Tagalog? Feel free to let us know in the comments section below! Oh, and don’t forget to visit our blog page for more articles like this!

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20 Filipino Angry Phrases, Plus Popular Tagalog Swear Words

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Want to learn some Tagalog swear words? Want to know how we Pinoys get angry and how we express our frustration? Well, you’ve come to the right place.

Before anything else, consider this quote by General Douglas MacArthur:

“Give me 10,000 Filipino soldiers and I will conquer the world.”

These words of the great American general are a confirmation of the bravery of the Filipino guerilla men and women who stood their ground against the Japanese colonizers during the Second World War. It’s not a surprise that MacArthur was impressed by the resilience and bravery of the Filipinos. After all, Pinoys are considered to be a “warlike” people. From the time of Lapu-Lapu to the days of heroes like Jose Rizal and Andres Bonifacio, Filipinos have never failed to show the world that they are no pushovers.

That doesn’t necessarily mean that Filipinos are always hot-headed. It only means they know when to stand up for what’s right. If you’ve been to the Philippines, you’ll agree that most Pinoys are very gentle, warmhearted, and hospitable.

Of course, they do get angry, but who doesn’t? And speaking of angry, in this article, you’ll learn how to express anger in Filipino grammar, as well as become familiar with some Tagalog swear words.

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Table of Contents

  1. Angry Imperatives
  2. Angry Warnings
  3. Angry Blames
  4. Angry Insults
  5. Describing How You Feel
  6. Popular Filipino Swear Words
  7. How Do Pinoys Keep Their Cool?
  8. Keep Calm and Learn Filipino

1. Angry Imperatives

Jose Rizal is the Epitome of Filipino Bravery and Courage

1 – Tumahimik ka!

This is the Tagalog equivalent of “Shut up!” or “You shut up!” and is used to express annoyance, particularly to someone who’s being unreasonable.

The word tumahimik means “to keep quiet,” but it’s the nearest equivalent to “shut up” since the English expression doesn’t have a direct translation in Filipino. Well, it does, but with a different meaning. It’s isara, which means “to close” or “to shut.”

    Tumahimik ka! Inuubos mo ang pasensya ko!
    “Shut up! You’re making me lose my patience!”

Variations:

  • Isara mo ang bunganga mo! (“Shut your mouth!” )
  • Huwag ka nang magsalita! (“Stop talking already!” )

2 – Tama na sabi!

There are times when you get annoyed, but the other person still keeps on bothering you. In frustration, you exclaim, Tama na sabi! This literally means “I said stop already!” Tama in this statement means “enough,” so, in a sense, Tama na sabi could mean, “I said enough already!”

Variations:

  • Tama na! (“Enough!” )

This is the quickest way to tell someone to quit annoying or angering you. Word for word, it translates to “Enough already!”

  • Tumigil ka! (“Stop!” )

3 – Huwag mo akong pakialaman!

People can sometimes be meddlesome, interfering with other people’s lives when they shouldn’t. Pinoys can be nosy at times, too, placing excessive interest in another person’s private affairs. At the same time, Filipinos can be very private people and easily get annoyed if they notice that you’re being obtrusive.

When that happens, prepare to hear the words, Huwag mo akong pakialaman! This translates to “Do not interfere in my business!” and is one of the best angry Filipino phrases for a situation like this.

    Hindi ikaw ang nanay ko kaya huwag mo akong pakialaman!
    “You’re not my mother, so mind your own business!”

Variations:

  • Huwag kang makialam! (“Do not interfere!” )
  • Intindihin mo ang sarili mo! (“Mind your own business!” )

4 – Tumabi ka diyan!

Most Pinoys avoid fights as much as possible. Being peace-loving people, they would even go out of their way to be the middleman when two people are fighting. But then again, most people don’t like it when you’re meddling with their personal affairs, especially when it involves them quarreling with another person.

This is where this angry phrase comes in. Tumabi is a verb that means “to step aside,” although it could also mean “to get out of the way.”

    Tumabi ka diyan kung ayaw mong madamay.
    “Out of my way if you don’t want to get involved.”

Variations:

  • Huwag kang humarang diyan! (“Don’t block my way!” )

Harang is Filipino for “obstruction.” You say this phrase to someone if you don’t want them blocking your view, either from another person or from something they wish to see.

  • Tabi! (“Step aside!” )

Tabi can be translated to “beside” or “aside.” In this case, the word is an order for someone to step aside.

  • Alis! (“Move!” )

Alis is literally “to leave.” When you don’t want someone in your way, you say Alis so they’ll move out of the way or leave.

2. Angry Warnings

1 – Huwag mong hintayin na mapuno ako!

These are some angry words in Filipino to say if you’re starting to lose your patience with someone. It’s a warning that tells another person that something bad might happen to them if they don’t quit bugging you.

The root word for mapuno is puno, meaning “full.” This phrase, in essence, implies being full of anger and exploding. It’s like saying, “Don’t wait for me to lose my patience,” or “Don’t wait for me to explode!”

Variations:

  • Punong-puno na ako sa’yo! (“I am so full of you!” )

In English, saying “I’m full of it!” implies that you’ve lost your patience with someone who keeps breaking their promises. This Filipino expression, however, is that of exasperation.

  • Malapit na akong sumabog! (“I am about to explode!” )

This Piece of Machine Is Literally Going to Explode Once She Throws It

2 – Isa na lang!

“One more and I’m going to blow!” This is what this angry warning is all about.

Variations:

  • Isang-isa na lang! (“You’ve run out of chances!” )

This basically means the same thing. The repetition is for emphasis.

  • Isa…dalawa…(“One…two…” )

Counting down to warn someone is very common in Filipino culture. It’s a major part of the “Behave or Else” parenting style of many Filipino parents.

3 – Lagot ka sa akin mamaya.

The word lagot has several meanings. It could mean “to snap” as with a rope, or “to fall.” When used as a word of warning, the latter is the more appropriate meaning; here, it means to fail or to drop someone.

To say Lagot ka sa akin mamaya to someone is telling that person that they’re going to be really sorry for what they’ve done. The word mamaya means “later.” Literally translated, it would mean, “I’m going to drop you/break you/cut you off!”

    Lagot ka sa akin mamaya ‘pag hindi ka pa tumigil diyan!
    “You’ll be sorry if you don’t quit doing that!”

Variations:

  • Hala ka!

There’s no direct translation of the word hala in English. In Tagalog, however, hala is an interjection used to warn or frighten someone.

  • Humanda ka!

The verb humanda means “to be ready.” When used as an expression of anger, it’s like telling the other person “You better be ready for what’s coming to you!”

4 – Hihintayin kita sa labas.

Most Filipinos know that there’s an appropriate place to express anger. So when someone is angry with a peer or a colleague, they won’t just fight with the other person right there and then, especially where someone in higher authority might see them. Instead, they’ll warn the other person that they’ll be waiting for them outside the building.

It’s Normal to Encounter Different Types of Personalities in the Workplace

  • Working in an office will allow you to meet different types of people, some of whom are easy to work with, and others not so much. Learning how to use Filipino words in the workplace will help you avoid conflict or resolve conflicts quickly in case they do arise.
  • Humanda ka, at hihintayin kita sa labas!
    “You better be ready ‘coz I’m going to wait for you outside!”

Variations:

  • Kita tayo sa labas.

Kita is the verb for “to see.” This is both a warning and invitation, informing the other party that you plan on seeing them outside.

  • Magkikita din tayo mamaya.

“We’re still going to see each other later anyway.” This is more of a threat that warns the other person they can’t get away from you.

  • The last two angry warnings are more of a threat. Should someone threaten you with the same words, don’t hesitate to seek help immediately.

3. Angry Blames

1 – Ano ba’ng iniisip mo?!

This, in essence, is letting the other person know that you find them stupid. The root word for iniisip is isip, which means “to think.” Asking another person what they’re thinking is sarcastically implying that they’re not focusing or are not thinking at all.

    Binangga mo ang kotse ko! Ano ba ang iniisip mo?
    “You hit my car! What were you thinking?”

Variations:

  • Nag-iisip ka ba? (“Are you even thinking?” )
  • Hindi ka talaga nag-iisip! (“You’re not using your brain!” )

Man Yelling

(Ano ba ang iniisip mo?!)

2 – Kasalanan mo ang lahat ng ito!

These are very critical words and are often said by a person who has already erupted in anger and frustration. It translates to “This is all your fault!”

    Naubos ang pera natin! Kasalanan mo ang lahat ng ito!
    “We are bankrupt, and this is all your fault!”

Variations:

  • Wala nang dapat sisihin dito kundi ikaw! (“There’s no one else to blame here but you!” )

The root word for sisihin is sisi, which means “to blame.”

  • Wala ka ng ginawang tama! (“You never did anything right!” )

3 – Dapat kasi nakinig ka!

When someone failed to listen to advice or instruction you gave them, and they’ve ended up messing things up, this is what you say to them.

    Tingnan mo. Nasira tuloy. Dapat kasi nakinig ka!
    “Look what happened. It’s broken now. You should have listened to me.”

Variations:

  • Makinig ka naman kasi paminsan-minsan. (“You should try listening to advice from time to time.” )
  • Dapat talaga hindi ako nakinig sa’yo. (“I shouldn’t have listened to you!” )

This is what you say when the roles are reversed, when someone gave you bad advice and you listened. Out of anger, you say: Dapat talaga hindi ako nakinig sa’yo. Napahamak tuloy ako. In essence, it’s saying, “I’m in trouble now because I listened to you!”

4 – Iyan ang sinasabi ko.

Iyan ang sinasabi ko is directly translated to “That’s what I was saying.” But as an expression of frustration and sarcasm, the more accurate interpretation would be, “What did I say?”

    Iyan ang sinasabi ko! Hindi mo kasi sinunod ang payo ko. Nagkasakit ka tuloy.
    “What did I say? You didn’t follow my advice, and now you’re sick!”

If Only You Listened

Variations:

  • Ano ba’ng sinabi ko sa’yo? (“What did I tell you?” )
  • Sabi sa’yo eh! (“I told you!” )

4. Angry Insults

How better to let someone know that you’re angry in Filipino than with insults?

1 – Hayop ka!

The word hayop can be translated to either “animal” or “beast.” You’ll know a Filipino is already very angry when they start blurting out these words.

Variations:

  • Animal ka! (“You animal!” ) or (“You beast!” )
  • Demonyo ka! (“You devil!” )

Demonyo means “demon” or “devil,” and since the devil is often portrayed as a beast, this is considered a good variation of the main phrase Hayop ka!

2 – Batugan! (“You lazy bastard!” )

While Filipinos are generally hardworking and industrious, many Pinoys can be slothful at times. This angry expression is one proof of that.

    Kumilos ka! Huwag kang batugan!
    “Do something! Don’t be a lazy bastard!”

Variations:

  • Tamad!

Tamad is just another term for batugan, which basically means “lazy” or “indolent.”

The Perfect Illustration for Someone Batugan

3 – Wala kang kwenta! (“You’re useless!” )

This is quite similar to the previous expression, except it’s more of an angry expression toward a person who, despite his or her efforts, doesn’t seem to do anything right. Kwenta can be interpreted as “count” or “value,” so to say that someone is walang kwenta is saying that they have no value or don’t count for anything.

Variations:

  • Wala kang silbi! (“You’re worthless!” )

Silbi means “to serve,” so Wala kang silbi! is the same as saying, “You don’t serve any purpose.”

  • Isa kang inutil! (“You’re one worthless person!” )

Inutil is derived from the same Spanish word, which means “useless” or “inservible.”

4 – Matapobre!

This is often an insult to someone who is full of himself and tends to look down on others. There’s no direct translation of matapobre in English, although it could mean “snobbish.” Essentially, matapobre is more of an idiomatic expression.

It came from the words mata (“eye” ) and pobre (“poor” ). Some scholars say that the word mata might have come from the Spanish matar (“to kill” ). In that sense, a person who’s matapobre is an elitist or someone who looks down on poor people.

Isa kang matapobre!

Variations:

  • Mapagmata (disdainful toward others)
  • Mapangmata (haughty)
  • Mapagmataas (proud)

5. Describing How You Feel

Negative Verbs

1 – Naiinis ako.

The verb mainis means “to be annoyed.” Naiinis ako means “I’m annoyed,” and you say it when you’re really pissed off already.

Variations:

  • Nakakainis ka! (“You’re so annoying!” )
  • Iniinis mo ako! (“You’re annoying me!” )
  • Nakakairita ka! (“You’re very irritating!” )

Another way of expressing annoyance in Tagalog is by saying Nakakairita ka! with irita being the Filipino word for “irritate.”

2 – Galit ako.

Galit is Filipino for “angry” or “mad.” By saying Galit ako, you’re saying, “I’m mad” or “I’m angry.”

Variations:

  • Ginagalit mo ako! (“You are angering me!” )
  • Galit ako sa’yo! (“I’m mad at you!” )
  • Pinapainit mo ang ulo ko!

Sometimes, instead of saying Galit ako, you can also say Pinapainit mo ang ulo ko. The verb pinapainit means “causing something to get hot.” Ulo is Filipino for “head,” so literally speaking, this phrase means, “You’re causing my head to get hot!”

3 – Nanggigigil ako!

The word gigil is used to describe an overwhelming feeling that comes over you, particularly when you see something cute. It’s also used to describe having an overwhelming feeling of disgust, anger, or rage, to the point that your body is shaking as a result. When you say Nanggigigil ako! what you’re trying to say is, “I’m shaking in anger right now!”

  • Nakakagigil ka!

This means that another person is causing you to feel so much anger and frustration. It doesn’t have a direct equivalent in English, but it could be translated to, “You are so frustrating!”

4 – Ayoko na!

Saying Ayoko na! is telling everyone that enough is enough. The word Ayoko is a contraction of the phrase Ayaw ko, with ayaw meaning “to back out from,” “to reject,” or “to refuse.” It may also mean “do not.” In saying Ayaw ko na, you’re literally saying, “I do not want (any of it) anymore,” or “I quit!”

Variations:

  • Suko na ako! (“I surrender!” )

Man Ripping Up Newspaper in Anger

(Suko na ako!)

6. Popular Filipino Swear Words

Every culture has its own list of swear words. In the Philippines, we also have our own Filipino swear words. This isn’t an exhaustive list, but it should be enough to give you an idea of the most commonly used negative expressions in Tagalog.

1 – Gago!

Calling someone gago is saying that the person is stupid or foolish, someone who doesn’t think before he acts. This is one of the most common angry words in Tagalog. It’s also a very insulting one because it’s like telling another person that he’s dull or unintelligent. The feminine version of the word is gaga. It translates to “You stupid fool!”

    → Ay, gago!
    “What an idiot!”

    → Napaka-gago mo!
    “You are so stupid!”

    → Gago ka ba?
    “Are you dumb?”

2 – Lintik!

This is Filipino for “lightning,” so in a sense, it’s wishing for your enemy to be struck by lightning. It’s like saying, “How I hope you die!”

    → Lintik ka! Tamaan ka sana ng kidlat!
    “May lightning strike you!”

Sometimes, the longer version is used to describe someone or something you hate so much. In this case, the phrase is Tinamaan ng lintik, which can be interpreted as “d*mned.”

    → Huwag mong ipapakita pa iyang tinamaan ng lintik na pagmumukha mo!
    “Don’t ever dare show that cursed face of yours!”

3 – Putik!

This is a lighter version of the word puta, which is Spanish for “whore.” Pinoys often modify certain curse words so as not to sound too vulgar. The word putik is actually Filipino for “mud.” As a curse word, it expresses frustration over someone or something ill-favored that you’ve encountered.

    → Putik na buhay naman ito!

This literally means, “What a rotten life!”

4 – Buwisit!

This is an exclamation for someone who’s had a bad day. It’s said that the word came from the Fukien phrase “bo ui sit,” which means having no food or not having any clothes on. It has since evolved to mean anyone or anything annoying or frustrating.

    → Buwisit na trabaho ‘to!
    “Curse this job!”

    → Nakaka-buwisit ka talaga!
    “You are so annoying!”

5 – Hudas!

Hudas is Filipino for “Judas,” the disciple who betrayed his master. Calling someone a Hudas implies that the person is a traitor.

    → Hudas ka!
    “You are a traitor!”

    → Hinudas mo ako!

In Filipino culture, the word Hudas has become synonymous with “traitor” or traidor. Hinudas mo ako! literally means, “You Judas-ed me!” Or, in essence, “You betrayed me!”

6 – Leche!

Leche is Spanish for “milk,” but over time, it has become synonymous with buwisit.

    → Leche na lugar ‘to!
    “Curse this place!”

A less vulgar variation is lechugas. The direct translation of the word is “lettuce,” but as a curse word, it means the same thing as leche.

7. How Do Pinoys Keep Their Cool?

Filipinos are easy to please. A simple lambing is often enough to appease an angry spouse. A “peace offering” is sufficient in restoring a broken friendship. But how do Pinoys calm themselves when they’re angry? While Filipinos are generally friendly, they also oftentimes shy away from confrontation. Instead of dealing with the issue directly, they try to keep their cool by distracting themselves.

  • Manners and courtesy are both very important to Filipinos. One way to influence the mood of someone who’s about to get angry is to remain polite at all times. Don’t fight fire with fire, they say.

1- Watching TV

A survey done a couple of years ago revealed that most Pinoys still prefer watching TV over using the internet. And this is not a surprise, considering how sacred the living room is for the Filipino family. For most Pinoys, it’s not only a place to bond with family, but an avenue where they drown their frustrations with their favorite noontime shows or prime-time soap operas.

Filipino Families Still Prefer TV

2- Singing and Listening to Music

Most Filipinos possess good musical sense, and that’s evidenced by the fact that we have a number of world-renowned singers and musicians. And yes, one of the reasons Pinoys love singing so much is that it helps them channel their anger into something productive.

3- Hanging out with Friends

If there’s one way Pinoys relieve stress and frustration, it’s by having a good laugh with the barkada (“peer” ). Filipinos value camaraderie a lot, which is why whichever part of the world you go to, you’ll always find that there’s a Filipino community there somewhere.

4- Eating

To say that Pinoys love eating is an understatement. But yes, Pinoys are certified food-lovers. One reason is that Filipinos are naturally hospitable, which means food is central to our social life. That explains the snacks in-between meals, which we refer to as merienda. And merienda isn’t only for during the day. Most of the time, we also have our midnight snack. And you guessed it right. When we’re frustrated, one way we rid ourselves of all the feelings of exasperation inside is through food.

5- Playing

Pinoys love to have fun. Kasiyahan, or “joy,” really plays a huge role in Filipino culture. And you’ve probably heard of how resilient Filipinos are. We seem to have this knack for finding a joke regardless of how serious a situation seems. Part of our having fun is playing. Kids will do all they can to skip the afternoon nap and play outside. Even adults find time to play after work hours. For us, playing is one way we can vent our anger.

8. Keep Calm and Learn Filipino

We would never wish for anyone to feel frustrated or angry, but since frustration is a part of life and anger is inevitable, it makes sense to know how to express anger, particularly in a language you’re trying to learn.

Fortunately, you can always have FilipinoPod101 as a partner in your language-learning journey. Whether you’re learning new words, improving your pronunciation, or trying to take your Filipino grammar to another level, you can rest assured that FilipinoPod101 can provide you with all the resources you need.

This article is just one of the many helpful tools you’ll find at the FilipinoPod101 blog page. If you wish to gain access to more similar tools, don’t hesitate to sign up today.

Oh, and before we forget, please let us know in the comments section below if there are other Tagalog swear words or tips on how to swear in Filipino you wish to learn. We’d be glad to assist you!

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Essential Vocabulary for Life Events in Filipino

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What is the most defining moment you will face this year? From memories that you immortalize in a million photographs, to days you never wish to remember, one thing’s for certain: big life events change you. The great poet, Bukowski, said, “We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well, that death will tremble to take us.” The older I get, the more I agree with him!

Talking about significant events in our lives is part of every person’s journey, regardless of creed or culture. If you’re planning to stay in Philippines for more than a quick visit, you’re sure to need at least a few ‘life events’ phrases that you can use. After all, many of these are shared experiences, and it’s generally expected that we will show up with good manners and warm wishes.

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Table of Contents

  1. Life Events
  2. Marriage Proposal Lines
  3. Talking About Age
  4. Conclusion

1. Life Events

Do you know how to say “Happy New Year” in Filipino? Well, the New Year is a pretty big deal that the whole world is in on! We celebrate until midnight, make mindful resolutions, and fill the night sky with the same happy words in hundreds of languages. No doubt, then, that you’ll want to know how to say it like a local!

Big life events are not all about fun times, though. Real life happens even when you’re traveling, and certain terminology will be very helpful to know. From talking about your new job to wishing your neighbors “Merry Christmas” in Filipino, here at FilipinoPod101, we’ve put together just the right vocabulary and phrases for you.

1- Birthday – kaarawan

If you’re like me, any excuse to bring out a pen and scribble a note is a good one. When there’s a birthday, even better: hello, handwriting!

Your Filipino friend will love hearing you wish them a “Happy birthday” in Filipino, but how much more will they appreciate a thoughtful written message? Whether you write it on their Facebook wall or buy a cute card, your effort in Filipino is sure to get them smiling! Write it like this:

Maligayang kaarawan

Older Woman Blowing Out Candles on a Birthday Cake Surrounded by Friends.

Now that you know the words, I challenge you to put them to music and sing your own “Happy birthday” song in Filipino! It’s not impossible to figure out even more lyrics, once you start discovering the language from scratch.

2- Buy – bumili

If there’s a special occasion, you might want to buy somebody a gift. As long as you’ve checked out Filipino etiquette on gift-giving (do a Google search for this!), it will be a lovely gesture. If you’re not sure what to buy, how about the awesome and universally-appealing gift of language? That’s a gift that won’t stop giving!

Two Women at a Counter in a Bookstore, One Buying a Book

3- Retire – magretiro

If you’re planning to expand your mind and retire in Philippines, you can use this word to tell people why you seem to be on a perpetual vacation!

Retirement is also a great time to learn a new language, don’t you think? And you don’t have to do it alone! These days it’s possible to connect to a vibrant learning community at the click of a button. The added benefit of a Daily Dose of Language is that it keeps your brain cells alive and curious about the world. After all, it’s never too late to realize those long-ignored dreams of traveling the globe…

4- Graduation – pagtatapos

When attending a graduation ceremony in Philippines, be prepared for a lot of formal language! It will be a great opportunity to listen carefully and see if you can pick up differences from the everyday Filipino you hear.

Lecturer or University Dean Congratulating and Handing Over Graduation Certificate to a Young Man on Graduation Day.

5- Promotion – pagtaas ng ranggo

Next to vacation time, receiving a promotion is the one career highlight almost everyone looks forward to. And why wouldn’t you? Sure, it means more responsibility, but it also means more money and benefits and – the part I love most – a change of scenery! Even something as simple as looking out a new office window would boost my mood.

6- Anniversary – anibersaryo

Some anniversaries we anticipate with excitement, others with apprehension. They are days marking significant events in our lives that can be shared with just one person, or with a whole nation. Whether it’s a special day for you and a loved one, or for someone else you know, this word is crucial to know if you want to wish them a happy anniversary in Filipino.

7- Funeral – libing

We tend to be uncomfortable talking about funerals in the west, but it’s an important conversation for families to have. Around the world, there are many different customs and rituals for saying goodbye to deceased loved ones – some vastly different to our own. When traveling in Philippines, if you happen to find yourself the unwitting observer of a funeral, take a quiet moment to appreciate the cultural ethos; even this can be an enriching experience for you.

8- Travel – bumiyahe

Travel – my favorite thing to do! Everything about the experience is thrilling and the best cure for boredom, depression, and uncertainty about your future. You will surely be forever changed, fellow traveler! But you already know this, don’t you? Well, now that you’re on the road to total Filipino immersion, I hope you’ve downloaded our IOS apps and have your Nook Book handy to keep yourself entertained on those long bus rides.

Young Female Tourist with a Backpack Taking a Photo of the Arc de Triomphe

9- Graduate – makatapos sa pag-aaral

If you have yet to graduate from university, will you be job-hunting in Philippines afterward? Forward-looking companies sometimes recruit talented students who are still in their final year. Of course, you could also do your final year abroad as an international student – an amazing experience if you’d love to be intellectually challenged and make a rainbow of foreign friends!

10- Wedding – kasal

One of the most-loved traditions that humans have thought up, which you’ll encounter anywhere in the world, is a wedding. With all that romance in the air and months spent on preparations, a wedding is typically a feel-good affair. Two people pledge their eternal love to each other, ladies cry, single men look around for potential partners, and everybody has a happy day of merrymaking.

Ah, but how diverse we are in our expression of love! You will find more wedding traditions around the world than you can possibly imagine. From reciting love quotes to marrying a tree, the options leave no excuse to be boring!

Married Couple During Reception, Sitting at Their Table While a Young Man Gives a Wedding Speech

11- Move – lumipat

I love Philippines, but I’m a nomad and tend to move around a lot, even within one country. What are the biggest emotions you typically feel when moving house? The experts say moving is a highly stressful event, but I think that depends on the circumstances. Transitional periods in our lives are physically and mentally demanding, but changing your environment is also an exciting adventure that promises new tomorrows!

12- Be born – ipinanganak

I was not born in 1993, nor was I born in Asia. I was born in the same year as Aishwarya Rai, Akon, and Monica Lewinsky, and on the same continent as Freddy Mercury. When and where were you born? More importantly – can you say it in Filipino?

13- Get a job – makakuha ng trabaho

The thought of looking for a job in a new country can be daunting, but English speakers are in great demand in Philippines – you just have to do some research, make a few friends and get out there! Also, arming yourself with a few Filipino introductions that you can both say and write will give you a confidence boost. For example, can you write your name in Filipino?

Group of People in Gear that Represent a Number of Occupations.

14- Die – mamatay

Death is a universal experience and the final curtain on all other life events. How important is it, then, to fully live before we die? If all you have is a passport, a bucket list, and a willingness to learn some lingo, you can manifest those dreams!

15- Home – bahay

If home is where the heart is, then my home is on a jungle island completely surrounded by the turquoise ocean. Right now, though, home is an isolation room with a view of half a dry palm tree and a tangle of telephone wires.

If you’re traveling to Philippines for an extended stay, you’ll soon be moving into a new home quite unlike anything you’ve experienced before!

Large, Double-Story House with Lit Windows.

16- Job – trabaho

What job do you do? Does it allow you much time for travel, or for working on this fascinating language that has (so rightfully) grabbed your attention? Whatever your job, you are no doubt contributing to society in a unique way. If you’re doing what you love, you’re already on the road to your dream. If not, just remember that every single task is one more skill to add to your arsenal. With that attitude, your dream job is coming!

17- Birth – kapanganakan

Random question: do you know the birth rate of Philippines?

If you’re lucky enough to be invited to see a friend’s baby just after they are born, you’ll have all my respect and all my envy. There is nothing cuter! Depending on which part of the country you’re in, you may find yourself bearing witness to some pretty unexpected birth customs. Enjoy this privilege!

Crying Newborn Baby Held By a Doctor or Nurse in a Hospital Theatre

18- Engaged – makisali

EE Cummings said, “Lovers alone wear sunlight,” and I think that’s most true at the moment she says “yes.” Getting engaged is something young girls dream of with stars in their eyes, and it truly is a magical experience – from the proposal, to wearing an engagement ring, to the big reveal!

In the world of Instagram, there’s no end to the antics as imaginative couples try more and more outrageous ways to share their engagement with the world. I love an airport flashmob, myself, but I’d rather be proposed to on a secluded beach – salt, sand, and all!

Engagement customs around the world vary greatly, and Philippines is no exception when it comes to interesting traditions. Learning their unique romantic ways will inspire you for when your turn comes.

Speaking of romance, do you know how to say “Happy Valentine’s Day” in Filipino?

19- Marry – magpakasal

The one you marry will be the gem on a shore full of pebbles. They will be the one who truly mirrors your affection, shares your visions for the future, and wants all of you – the good, the bad and the inexplicable.

From thinking up a one-of-a-kind wedding, to having children, to growing old together, finding a twin flame to share life with is quite an accomplishment! Speaking of which…

2. Marriage Proposal Lines

Marriage Proposal Lines

Ah, that heart-stopping moment when your true love gets down on one knee to ask for your hand in marriage, breathlessly hoping that you’ll say “Yes!” If you haven’t experienced that – well, it feels pretty darn good, is all I can say! If you’re the one doing the asking, though, you’ve probably had weeks of insomnia agonizing over the perfect time, location and words to use.

Man on His Knee Proposing to a Woman on a Bridge.

How much more care should be taken if your love is from a different culture to yours? Well, by now you know her so well, that most of it should be easy to figure out. As long as you’ve considered her personal commitment to tradition, all you really need is a few words from the heart. Are you brave enough to say them in Filipino?

3. Talking About Age

Talking about Age

Part of the wonder of learning a new language is having the ability to strike up simple conversations with strangers. Asking about age in this context feels natural, as your intention is to practice friendly phrases – just be mindful of their point of view!

When I was 22, I loved being asked my age. Nowadays, if someone asks, I say, “Well, I’ve just started my fifth cat life.” Let them ponder that for a while.

In Philippines, it’s generally not desirable to ask an older woman her age for no good reason, but chatting about age with your peers is perfectly normal. Besides, you have to mention your birthday if you want to be thrown a birthday party!

4. Conclusion

Well, there you have it! With so many great new Filipino phrases to wish people with, can you think of someone who has a big event coming up? If you want to get even more creative, FilipinoPod101 has much to inspire you with – come and check it out! Here’s just some of what we have on offer at FilipinoPod101:

  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Filipino with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account – for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Filipino dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about FilipinoPod101…!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters, as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. You can have your very own Filipino teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to – what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Filipino word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Filipino level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

Learning a new language can only enrich your life, and could even open doors towards great opportunities! So don’t wonder if you’ll regret enrolling in FilipinoPod101. It’s the most fun, easy way to learn Filipino.

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Talk About the Weather in Filipino Like a Native

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Did you know that every minute of the day, one billion tons of rain falls on the earth? Hard to believe, considering the climate crisis! Of course, all that rain is not equally shared across the planet.

So, would you mention this fascinating fact to your new Filipino acquaintance? Well, small talk about local weather is actually a great conversation-starter. Everyone cares about the weather and you’re sure to hear a few interesting opinions! Seasons can be quite unpredictable these days and nobody knows the peculiarities of a region better than the locals.

FilipinoPod101 will equip you with all the weather vocabulary you need to plan your next adventure. The weather can even be an important discussion that influences your adventure plans. After all, you wouldn’t want to get caught on an inflatable boat with a two-horsepower motor in Hurricane Horrendous!

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Table of Contents

  1. Talking about the weather in Philippines
  2. Words for the first day of spring
  3. Do You Know the Essential Summer Vocabulary?
  4. Must-Know Autumn vocabulary
  5. Winter
  6. FilipinoPod101 can prepare you for any season.

1. Talking about the weather in Philippines

Talking About Weather

If you’re like me, your day’s activity plan is likely to begin with a strong local coffee and a chat about what the sky is doing. After all, being prepared could be the difference between an amazing day and a miserable one! Luckily, it’s not difficult to comment on Filipino weather – just start with these simple words and phrases.

1- The rain is falling on the street – Ang ulan ay bumabagsak sa kalye.

Watercolor artists, take out your paints! You might not be able to venture out on foot today, but just embrace the rain as part of your Filipino experience. When the rain stops, the air will be clean and colours vibrant.

2- The snow has covered everything – Tinabunan ng niyebe ang kalahatan.

A fresh blanket of snow is irresistibly beautiful. Pull on your boots and beanie, and leave your tracks in this foreign landscape. Don’t resist the urge to build a snowman – you need this!

3- Fluffy cloud – mahimulmol na ulap

When you’re waiting for a warm beach day, fluffy white clouds in a blue sky are a good sign. Don’t forget your sunscreen, as clouds will intensify the UV rays hitting your skin.

Fluffy White Cloud in Clear Blue Sky

4- The water froze on the glass – Ang tubig sa baso ay nagyelo.

Night temperatures can get chilly and might freeze the condensation on your windows. A good way to clear them up is with warm salt water.

5- The heavy rain could cause flash flooding – Ang malakas na ulan ay maaaring maging sanhi ng mabilis na pagbaha.

If you’re visiting Philippines in the wet season, it’s important to stay informed when heavy rain sets in, so keep an eye on the weather radar. Avoid river activities and rather spend this time making a home-cooked meal and brushing up on your Filipino weather words.

Heavy Rain in a Park

6- Flood – baha

If you do get caught in a flood, your destination should no longer be ‘home’, but the nearest high ground.

7- The typhoon has hit – Ang bagyo ay dumating.

Not all countries experience typhoons, but you need to know when to prepare for one! It will be very scary if you’ve never experienced one before. Your local neighbours are the best people to advise you on where to take shelter, as they’ve been doing it for generations. Be sure to get the low-down at the first sign of rough weather!

8- Check the weather report before going sailing – Suriin ang ulat ng panahon bago maglayag.

When planning an outdoor activity, especially on a body of water, always be prepared for a change in the weather. Ask your hotel receptionist or neighbour where you can get a reliable daily weather report, and don’t forget your sweater!

Two Men on Sailboat

9- Today’s weather is sunny with occasional clouds – Ang panahon ngayon ay magiging maaraw na may paminsan-minsang pagkulimlim.

Sunny weather is the dream when traveling in Philippines! Wake up early, pack the hats and sunblock and go and experience the terrain, sights and beautiful spots. You’ll be rewarded with happy vibes all around.

10- A rainy day – maulan na araw

Remember when you said you’d save the Filipino podcasts for a rainy day? Now’s that day!

11- Scenic rainbow – dulaan ng bahaghari

The best part about the rain is that you can look forward to your first rainbow in Philippines. There’s magic in that!

12- Flashes of lightning can be beautiful, but are very dangerous – Kumislap na kidlat ay maaaring maging maganda ngunit tunay na mapanganib.

Lightning is one of the most fascinating weather phenomena you can witness without really being in danger – at least if you’re sensible and stay indoors! Did you know that lightning strikes the earth 40-50 times per second? Fortunately, not all countries experience heavy electric storms!

Electric Storm

13- 25 degrees Celsius – antas na 25 Sentigrado

Asking a local what the outside temperature will be is another useful question for planning your day. It’s easy if you know the Filipino term for ‘degrees Celsius’.

14- His body temperature was far above the usual 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit – Ang temperatura ng kanyang katawan ay malayo sa normal na antas na 98.6 Parenhayt.

Although the Fahrenheit system has been replaced by Celsius in almost all countries, it’s still used in the US and a few other places. Learn this phrase in Filipino in case one of your companions develops a raging fever.

15- Clear sky – malinaw

Clear skies mean you’ll probably want to get the camera out and capture some nature shots – not to mention the great sunsets you’ll have later on. Twilight can lend an especially magical quality to a landscape on a clear sky day, when the light is not filtered through clouds.

Hikers on Mountain with Clear Sky

16- Light drizzle – ambon

Days when it’s drizzling are perfect for taking in the cultural offerings of Philippines. You could go to the mall and watch a Filipino film, visit museums and art galleries, explore indoor markets or even find the nearest climbing wall. Bring an umbrella!

17- Temperature on a thermometer – temperatura sa isang termometro

Because of the coronavirus, many airports are conducting temperature screening on passengers. Don’t worry though – it’s just a precaution. Your temperature might be taken with a no-touch thermometer, which measures infrared energy coming off the body.

18- Humid – namamasa

I love humid days, but then I’m also a water baby and I think the two go
together like summer and rain. Find a pool or a stream to cool off in – preferably in the shade!

Humidity in Tropical Forest

19- With low humidity the air feels dry – Sa halumigmig na mababa mararamdaman ang tuyong hangin.

These are the best days to go walking the hills and vales. Just take at least one Filipino friend with you so you don’t get lost!

20- The wind is really strong – Ang hangin ay talagang malakas.

A strong wind blows away the air pollution and is very healthy in that respect. Just avoid the mountain trails today, unless you fancy being blown across the continent like a hot air balloon.

21- It’s windy outside – Mahangin sa labas.

Wind! My least favourite weather condition. Of course, if you’re a kitesurfer, a windy day is what you’ve been waiting for!

Leaves and Umbrella in the Wind

22- Wet roads can ice over when the temperature falls below freezing – Basang daan ay maaaring magyelo kapag ang temperatura ay mas bumaba pa sa pagyeyelo.

The roads will be dangerous in these conditions, so please don’t take chances. The ice will thaw as soon as the sun comes out, so be patient!

23- Today is very muggy – Ngayon ay masyadong maalinsangan.

Muggy days make your skin feel sticky and sap your energy. They’re particular to high humidity. Cold shower, anyone? Ice vest? Whatever it takes to feel relief from the humidity!

24- Fog – hamog

Not a great time to be driving, especially in unknown territory, but keep your fog lights on and drive slowly.

Fog on a Pond with Ducks

25- Hurricane – bagyo

Your new Filipino friends will know the signs, so grab some food and candles and prepare for a night of staying warm and chatting about wild weather in Philippines.

Palm Trees in a Hurricane

26- Big tornado – malaking buhawi

If you hear these words, it will probably be obvious already that everyone is preparing for the worst! Definitely do whatever your accommodation hosts tell you to do when a tornado is expected.

27- It’s cloudy today – maulap ngayon

While there won’t be any stargazing tonight, the magnificent clouds over Philippines will make impressive photographs. Caption them in Filipino to impress your friends back home!

Cloudy Weather on Beach with Beach Huts

28- Below freezing temperatures – temperatura na mas bumaba sa pagyeyelo

When the temperature is below freezing, why not take an Uber and go shopping for some gorgeous Filipino winter gear?

Woman with Winter Gear in Freezing Weather

29- Wind chill is how cold it really feels outside – Maginaw na hangin ay ang tunay na hangin na nararamdaman sa labas.

Wind doesn’t change the ambient temperature of the air, it just changes your body temperature, so the air will feel colder to you than it actually is. Not all your Filipino friends will know that, though, so learn this Filipino phrase to sound really smart!

30- Water will freeze when the temperature falls below zero degrees celsius – Tubig ay magyeyelo kapag ang temperatura ay bumaba sa sero sentigrado.

If you’re near a lake, frozen water is good news! Forgot your ice skates? Don’t despair – find out where you can hire some. Be cautious, though: the ice needs to be at least four inches thick for safe skating. Personally, I just slide around on frozen lakes in my boots!

Thermometer Below Freezing Point

31- Waiting to clear up – naghihintay na magliwanag

Waiting for the weather to clear up so you can go exploring is frustrating, let’s be honest. That’s why you should always travel with two things: a scintillating novel and your Filipino Nook Book.

32- Avoid the extreme heat – iwasan ang matinding init

Is the heat trying to kill you? Unless you’re a hardened heatwave hero, definitely avoid activity, stay hydrated and drink electrolytes. Loose cotton or linen garb is the way to go!

Hand Holding a Melting Ice Cream

33- Morning frost – umagang lamig

Frost is water vapour that has turned to ice crystals and it happens when the earth cools so much in the night, that it gets colder than the air above it. Winter is coming!

34- Rain shower – Pagpatak ng ulan

Rain showers are typically brief downpours that drench the earth with a good drink of water.

35- In the evening it will become cloudy and cold – Sa gabi, ito ay magiging maulap at malamig.

When I hear this on the Filipino weather channel, I buy a bottle of wine (red, of course) and wood for the fireplace. A cold and cloudy evening needs its comforts!

Snow in the Park at Night

36- Thunderstorm – bagyo

Keep an eye on the Filipino weather maps if it looks like a big storm is coming, so you’ll be well-informed.

37- Ice has formed on the window – Ang yelo ay nabuo sa bintana.

You could try this phrase out on the hotel’s helpful cleaning staff, or fix the problem yourself. Just add a scoop or two of salt to a spray bottle of water – that should work!

38- Large hailstones – malalaking bato ng yelong ulan

As a kid, I found hail crazy exciting. Not so much now – especially if I’m on the road and large hailstones start pummeling my windscreen!

Large Hailstones on a Wooden Floor

39- Rolling thunder – pagulong ng kulog

The rumble of rolling thunder is that low-volume, ominous background sound that goes on for some time. It’s strangely exciting if you’re safely in your hotel room; it could either suddenly clear up, or escalate to a storm.

40- Sleet – ulan kasama ng niyebe

Sleet is tiny hard pieces of ice made from a mixture of rain and melted snow that froze. It can be messy, but doesn’t cause major damage the way hail does. Pretty cool to know this word in Filipino!

2. Words for the first day of spring

You know the feeling: your heart skips a beat when you wake up and spring has sprung! Spring will reward you with new blossoms everywhere, birdsong in the air, kittens being born in the neighborhood and lovely views when you hit the trails. Pack a picnic and ask a new Filipino friend to show you the more natural sights. Don’t forget a light sweater and a big smile. This is the perfect time to practice some Filipino spring words!

Spring Vocabulary

3. Do You Know the Essential Summer Vocabulary?

Summer! Who doesn’t love that word? It conjures up images of blue skies, tan skin, vacations at the beach and cruising down the coast in an Alfa Romeo, sunglasses on and the breeze in your hair. Of course, in Philippines there are many ways to enjoy the summer – it all depends on what you love to do. One thing’s for sure: you will have opportunities to make friends, go on picnics, sample delicious local ice-cream and maybe even learn to sing some Filipino songs. It’s up to you! Sail into Filipino summer with this summer vocab list, and you’ll blend in with ease.

Four Adults Playing on the Beach in the Sand

4. Must-Know Autumn vocabulary

Victoria Ericksen said, “If a year was tucked inside of a clock, then autumn would be the magic hour,” and I agree. Who can resist the beauty of fall foliage coloring the Filipino landscape? Birds prepare to migrate; travelers prepare to arrive for the best weather in Philippines.

The autumnal equinox marks the moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator, making day and night almost equal in length. The cool thing about this event is that the moon gets really bright – the ‘harvest moon’, as it’s traditionally known.

So, as much as the change of season brings more windy and rainy days, it also brings celebration. Whether you honor Thanksgiving, Halloween or the Moon Festival, take some time to color your vocabulary with these Filipino autumn words.

Autumn Phrases

5. Winter

Winter is the time the natural world slows down to rest and regroup. I’m a summer girl, but there are fabulous things about winter that I really look forward to. For one, it’s the only season I get to accessorize with my gorgeous winter gloves and snug down coat!

Then, of course, there’s ice skating, holiday decorations and bonfires. As John Steinbeck said, “What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness?” Get ready for the cold season with our list of essential Winter words!

Skier Sitting in the Snow

6. FilipinoPod101 can prepare you for any season.

Now that you know how to inquire and comment on the weather in Philippines, you
can confidently plan your weather-ready travel itinerary. How about this for an idea: the next
time you’re sitting in a Filipino street café, try asking someone local this question:

“Do you think the weather will stay like this for a few days?” If you loved learning these cool Filipino weather phrases with us, why not take it a step further and add to your repertoire? FilipinoPod101 is here to help!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Time Phrases in Filipino

The Filipino Calendar: Talking About Dates in Filipino

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Did you know there are many different types of calendars?

As you probably know – a calendar is a system of organizing days in weeks and months for specific purposes, according to Wikipedia.

Worldwide, most countries use the Gregorian calendar. Some just work on the same framework, meaning that time is divided into units based on the earth’s movement around the sun – the “solar calendar”. Other calendars keep time by observing the moon’s movements, a combination of the moon and the sun’s movements, and seasons.

Through FilipinoPod101, you can learn all about this and so much more! Our themed, culturally relevant lessons are skillfully designed so you can do your planning perfectly for a holiday or a date.

Having a good plan for a visit or a trip is like studying well for an exam. You’re just so much better prepared! For that, you could well need specific phrases to plan around appointments and such, especially on business trips. Make sure to use the charts we provide here with the days of the week in Filipino, as well as the months in Filipino to navigate your way as you plan. Great resources!

Also – always remember to have fun!

Table of Contents

  1. Why Will It Help To Know How To Talk About Dates in Filipino?
  2. Talking About your Plans
  3. Can FilipinoPod101 Help You In Other Ways Too?

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Time Phrases in Filipino

1. Why Will It Help To Know How To Talk About Dates in Filipino?

Days of the Week

Well, that’s not a difficult question to answer. No matter why you’re travelling, it would be best to at least know the names of days and months in Filipino. You don’t want to miss your flight or an appointment because you confused “Biyernes” (Friday) with “Sabado” (Saturday)! Or maybe you planned a holiday for “Hulyo” (July), but you booked a flight for “Hunyo” (June) by accident!

Avoid this confusion by learning the Filipino calendar before you leave.

Now, as promised, the 15 phrases to help you make and discuss plans.

2. Talking About your Plans

Months of the Year

Perhaps you’re working in Philippines, or maybe you’re enjoying a prolonged holiday. Fabulous! Memorize these phrases so you can be sure to successfully negotiate meetings, appointments, dates, events, the list goes on!

1. Anon bang gagawin mo sa Sabado at Linggo?

“What are you doing this weekend?”

This question is usually a preamble to inviting someone somewhere. Given that it’s over the weekend, it probably means a casual get-together or another social event. (But not necessarily! A manager or boss could also ask this for entirely different reasons.)

It’s a handy phrase to know when you’ve made Filipino or expat friends in the country. Or, be the one doing the inviting. Then train your ear to learn the following phrases so you can understand the response.

2. Maglalakbay ako ngayong katapusan ng linggo.

“I am traveling this weekend.”

This could be a reply if you’re not available because you’re doing other fun stuff.

No matter why you are visiting Philippines, do take the time to explore the country! It’s beautiful and it has so many wonderful, interesting spots ready to be visited.

Couple at booking in Desk

3. Nagpaplano akong manatili sa bahay.

“I am planning to stay at home.”

Maybe you feel unwell, but don’t want to give too much information? Or maybe you have work to do? Perhaps you just need some quiet gardening time…it doesn’t matter. This response is polite and honest without oversharing.

It could also be a slightly open-ended response, depending on how you deliver it. Because hey, being home could still mean your plans are flexible, right?

That said – depending on your relationship with the inviter, nuances like these will probably not be so apparent in a foreign culture. So, best to use this excuse for declining an invitation only if you are truly set on staying in.

Woman Doing Gardening

4. Abala ako ngayong linggo.

“This week I am busy.”

Another polite phrase that gives a reason for declining an invitation but without oversharing details.

Don’t decline too many invitations, though! You don’t want people to think that you’re too busy to hang out with them. They will stop inviting you out, and you know how the saying goes – all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy…! Being social is good for the soul.

5. Libre ako bukas.

“I am free tomorrow.”

Yay! Perhaps you were approached by that person and they asked about your availability for a date. This would be a fine reply. Not too eager, but still indicating that you’re interested.

Or maybe you’re just replying to a colleague or manager’s request for a meeting. Polite, honest and clear.

Alternatively, you’re just busy right now, and plans are not going the way they were…well, planned. Compromise is a lovely thing! And this phrase sounds just like that.

Use it to indicate that you want to accommodate an invitation or the inviter’s plans, despite your current unavailability. Only if you are really free, of course.

6. Maaari ba nating i-reschedule ito?

“Can we reschedule this?”

So, life happened and you are unable to meet obligations or attend a planned meeting. This is a suitable question to ask if you wish to indicate your willingness to still engage with whatever is on the table.

Obviously you should (ideally) not ask to reschedule a party or big meeting! (Unless you’re the boss or it’s your own party, of course.) But if there’s reasonable wiggle room regarding arrangements, then this one’s your question.

Business Man Sitting with Schedule

7. Magkakaroon ako nang sapat na oras pagtatapos ng buwan.

“I will have enough time at the end of the month.”

A go-to phrase when events or activities are likely to take up a lot of your time, such as going away for a weekend, spending the day at a local market, or writing your manager’s quarterly report (with 20 flow-charts in Powerpoint) – anything that won’t only take an hour or two.

8. Kailan ang pinakamagandang oras na nababagay sayo?

“When is the best time that suits you?”

Remember phrase #5? That was a possible reply to this question. Asked by your crush, very possibly! Or, it could be asked by any other person for any other reason, doesn’t matter.

If this is addressed to you, it usually means that the person respects your time and schedule, which is a good thing. It probably also means that their own schedule is flexible, another good thing.

This is also a polite question to ask when a manager or senior colleague wants to meet with you. Let them decide on the time, and be as accommodating as possible. This attitude shows respect for seniority – good for career building. (Within reason, of course. You don’t need to postpone your wedding or your paid-up holiday to Australia because your manager wants to see you.)

Screen Tablet Hotel

9. Ayos lang ba ang petsa na ito sayo?

“Is this date OK with you?”

But – if the other party insists that you choose a time for a meeting, appointment, or date etc., then do so! Respond with this nice, somewhat casual question that leaves space for negotiation, but only needs a simple reply.

Suitable for friends, and casual acquaintances and colleagues.

10. Libre ka ba sa araw na iyon?

“Are you available on that day?”

This is the a-bit-more-formal version of the previous question. Again, it has room for negotiation, but only needs a simple response – nice and neat!

Maybe this is the go-to question when you’re addressing your seniors at work, or a person much older than you.

11. Maaari ba nating gawin ito sa lalong madaling panahon?

“Can we do it as soon as possible?”

This question has an urgency to it that should preferably be responded to with the same. A simple reply will be good – yes or no. Less negotiable, this is still polite because it’s a question that gives you a choice.

But stand ready with one of the phrases in this article to help tie down a time and date!

Couple Getting Engaged on a Bridge

12. Libre ako tuwing gabi.

“I’m available every evening”

If you’re going to reply with this phrase, context is everything.

– If it’s your manager asking you to put in a bit of overtime, and you are available to – great reply! When deadlines are tight and everybody is stressing, your willingness to go the extra mile can only improve your relationship with your boss.

(Still, no need to be a doormat! If you get asked to work overtime too often, or if everyone else is goofing around while you have to graft, then re-evaluate the situation. And if you feel you’re being exploited a bit, don’t stress! Equip yourself with the diplomatic, yet assertive responses right in this article.)

– If it’s an old friend or longtime significant other asking to hang out – good reply. You know one another and appearances don’t matter any longer.

– If it’s a new crush who just asked when you’d be available for a date – stop. Not such a great reply. Tone down a bit! “Interested but not overly eager” is what you’re going for here.

Refer back to response #5, or use a counter-question, such as #1. Whatever suits you.

But if they – or anyone else – invite you to scale the Himalayas with them, then the next phrase will probably be the only sane response!

Mountaineer in Snow

13. Kailangan kong planuhin ito nang maaga.

“I need to plan this well in advance.”

So, as said under #9, perhaps you’re invited to join someone conquer the Himalayas.

Or your company manager wants you to plan the Party that Tops All Year-End Parties Forever.

Simply – if you get asked to do something that you know will need a lot of thorough planning, this is a good phrase to respond with.

It’s an assertive phrase that demonstrates two things regarding your attitude:

a) That you know your own abilities, and respect your own schedule.
b) That your respect other people’s time and schedule too.

Then just be sure to actually do that planning well in advance!

14. Kailangan nating humanap ng iba pang petsa.

“We need to find another date.”

So, you’re in negotiations regarding a date.

This is an assertive statement that should probably not be used with a “My way or the highway” attitude.

That stuff only works in the movies – think sharp-tongued Samuel L. Jackson. Or fierce Kristen Stewart. Yea, they can be scary, so tone down that tone.

Also, be mindful that fickle people who change plans all the time don’t keep friends! Taking others’ needs into consideration, while simultaneously having your way is a delicate art that takes proper cultivation. Use this phrase sparingly – we have better ones here to negotiate with.

Rock Concert Hands in the Air

Of course, if your planned trip to the dentist falls on the same day as the only Billie Eilish concert close by…well, priorities are priorities. Feel free to call the dentist with this phrase. Or even better, use the next one.

15. Hindi ko yan magagawa sa araw na iyon.

“I cannot do it on that day.”

This is the low-key-but-still-firm cousin of the previous phrase. You’re stating a personal fact, and depending on your tone, this can be as non-negotiable as you prefer.

Again, only use this when you really mean it, if you’re visiting Philippines or any other foreign country.

So, that’s it, folks! Which phrase did you find the most helpful? Let us know in the comments!

3. Can FilipinoPod101 Help You In Other Ways Too?

Numbers

Well yes, of course!

We think you will find these phrases easy to use when talking about dates and months in Filipino. But knowing how to employ them properly could help you avoid sticky situations!

FilipinoPod101 is uniquely geared to help you with this and so much more.

This InnovativeLanguage.com initiative is one of many online language-learning courses. With us, you’ll find it easy and fun to learn a new language, and here are a few reasons why:

  • Immediately upon enrollment, you’ll receive hundreds of well-designed lessons to get you going.
  • Watch superb recordings of native Filipino speakers in cool slide-shows – the easy way to practice till you sound just like a native speaker yourself!
  • Also immediately upon enrollment, you’ll get access to a huge library of free resources! These include extensive, theme-based Vocabulary Lists and a Word of the Day List (For free, hot bargains!) These alone are sure to give your vocab-learning boxing gloves.
  • You’ll also immediately be able to use an excellent and free Filipino online dictionary. Necessary for quick, handy translations, no matter where you find yourself.
  • For the serious learner, there are numerous enrollment upgrades available, one of which offers you a personal, online Filipino host. Allow us to hold your hand and support you in your learning!

If you’re serious about mastering Filipino easily yet correctly, FilipinoPod101 is definitely one of, if not the best, online language learning platforms available. Talking about your plans or dates in Filipino need not ever spoil your stay.

So, hurry up—enroll today!

Learn How to Talk About Your Family in Filipino

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Did you know that only some reptiles and birds don’t parent their offspring? Except for crocodiles, all reptiles (and one family of bird species called megapodes) hatch from eggs and grow up alone, without any family.

The rest of us need family if we are to survive and thrive – humans and animals alike!

At FilipinoPod101, we know how important family is. Therefore, we take care to teach you all the important vocabulary and phrases pertaining to family.

Table of Contents

  1. Why Is It Important to Know Filipino Vocabulary about Family?
  2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first
  3. How FilipinoPod101 Can Help You Learn Filipino Family Terms

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Family Phrases in Filipino

1. Why Is It Important to Know Filipino Vocabulary about Family?

Lioness with Cub

Well, if you’re serious about studying any new language, then learning about the most important social unit in Filipino culture would be a crucial part of your education.

What is family, though? Strictly speaking, it’s a group of people who live together and are supposed to take care of one another. Some of them are genetically linked.

Family isn’t just about who we’re related to by blood, of course. It’s also one of the main influences in shaping every child’s life.

Family is Important for Children’s Healthy Development

Phrases Parents Say

Family is the single most important influence in a child’s life. Children depend on parents and family to protect them and provide for their needs from the day they were born.

Primary caregivers, which usually comprise parents and family, form a child’s first relationships. They are a child’s first teachers and are role models that show kids how to act and experience the world around them.

By nurturing and teaching children during their early years, families play an important role in making sure children are ready to learn when they enter school.

Families Can Take All Shapes and Sizes

However, the way families are put together is by no means standard.

Mom and Daughter

Single-parent and same-gender households have become a new norm the past few decades, and there’s no shame in this. When there is love, connection and proper care, a child can thrive anywhere.

Everyone also knows that sometimes friends can become like family and remain with us for life, because it’s all about human connection.

After all, we share many commonalities simply because we’re human, and we are programmed to connect with one another and belong to a group. This is very important for our well-being and survival.

It’s All About Feeling Connected

As John Northman, a psychologist from Buffalo, NY, told WebMD – feeling connected to others contributes to mental as well as physical health.

He pointed out that when people feel connected, they feel better physically, and they’re also less likely to feel depressed.

Couples Chatting

Or, if they do feel depressed, they’d be in a better position to get out of it when they feel they are connecting with others. This is because they would be psychologically supported too, Northman said.

There has even been some links drawn between addiction and feeling disconnected from others. According to an article in Psychology Today, research indicates that addiction is not solely a substance disorder, but also affected by people feeling insecurely attached to others.

It showed that securely attached individuals tend to feel comfortable in and enjoy life, while insecurely attached people typically struggle to fit in and connect.

2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first

So, it’s clear that for most of us, family is our entry point into connection and belonging. This is true of every culture, so in every country, family takes prominence.

For this reason, FilipinoPod101 offers culturally-relevant lessons that will equip you well to understand families in Philippines.

Here are some of the most important Filipino vocabulary and quotes about family and parenting!

A) Filipino Family Vocabulary

Let’s start with the basic vocabulary. Without this collection of words, you’ll have a hard time describing any member of your family at all.

Family Terms
Family
pamilya
Great grandfather
lolo sa tuhod
Mother
ina
Grandmother
lola
Father
ama
Grandfather
lolo
Wife
asawang babae
Grandchild
apo
Husband
asawang lalaki
Granddaughter
apo na babae
Parent
magulang
Grandson
apo na lalake
Child
bata
Aunt
tiyahin
Daughter
anak na babae
Uncle
tiyuhin
Sister
kapatid na babae
Niece
pamangking babae
Brother
kapatid na lalaki
Nephew
pamangking lalaki
Younger sister
nakababatang kapatid na babae
Younger brother
nakababatang kapatid na lalaki
Older brother
kuya
Great grandmother
lola sa tuhod
Cousin
pinsan
Mother-in-law
biyenan na babae
Father-in-law
biyenan na lalaki
Sister-in-law
hipag
Brother-in-law
bayaw
Partner
kapartner

Family of Three

B) Quotes About Family

Filipino Family Quotes

One of the ways to improve your Filipino language skills is by memorizing quotes from books, or poems.

Either source some from Filipino literature, or make use of ours!

Hindi mo pinipili ang iyong pamilya. Sila ay kaloob sa’yo ng Diyos, gaya ng pagkaloob sa iyo para naman sa kanila.

“You don’t choose your family. They are God’s gift to you, as you are to them.” – Desmond Tutu

Ang pamilya ay hindi isang mahalagang bagay lamang. Ito ay ang lahat.

“Family is not an important thing. It’s everything.” – Michael J. Fox

Ang ibig sabihin ng pamilya ay walang naiiwan o nalilimutan.

“Family means no one gets left behind or forgotten.” – David Ogden Stiers

Ang aking pamilya ang aking lakas at kahinaan.

“My family is my strength and my weakness.” – Aishwarya Rai

Ang pamilya ay isa sa mga pinakamagandang likha ng kalikasan.

“The family is one of nature’s masterpieces.” – George Santayana

Sa panahon ng kagipitan, ang iyong pamilya ang susuporta sa iyo.

“When trouble comes, it’s your family that supports you.” – Guy Lafleur

Ang pamilya ang pinakamahalagang selula ng lipunan.

“The family is the first essential cell of human society.” – Pope John XXIII

Walang isang bagay na kasiya-siya para sa buong pamilya.

“There is no such thing as fun for the whole family.” – Jerry Seinfeld

Kailangan mong ipagtanggol ang iyong dangal. At ang iyong pamilya.

“You have to defend your honor. And your family.” – Suzanne Vega

Lahat ng maligayang pamilya ay pare-pareho; bawat pamilyang malungkot ay malungkot sa sarili nitong paraan.

“All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” – Leo Tolstoy

C) Test Your Knowledge!

Do you feel you have learned a lot in this blog? Let’s quickly test that!

In the table below, match the Filipino vocabulary on the left with the definition of the relative in the right column.

MY RELATIVES
Relative Name Definition
1. pamilya a. My male child
2. ina b. My older male sibling
3. ama c. My female sibling
4. asawang babae d. My child’s child
5. asawang lalaki e. My child’s female child
6. magulang f. My female parent
7. bata g. My grandparent’s mother
8. anak na babae h. Mother to one of my parents
9. anak na lalaki i. Relatives
10. kapatid na babae j. My female child
11. kapatid na lalaki k. My younger male sibling
12. nakababatang kapatid na babae l. Male spouse
13. nakababatang kapatid na lalaki m. The father of one of my parents
14. kuya n. My child’s male child
15. lola sa tuhod o. My children’s father or mother
16. lolo sa tuhod p. The sister of one of my parents
17. lola q. The brother of one of my parents
18. lolo r. My male parent
19. apo s. My sibling’s female child
20. apo na babae t. My sibling’s male child
21. apo na lalake u. My male sibling
22. tiyahin v. My parents’ sibling’s child
23. tiyuhin w. Female spouse
24. pamangking babae x. The grandfather of one of my parents
25. pamangking lalaki y. The person I am a parent to
26. pinsan z. My younger female sibling

How did it go? Don’t worry if you had trouble with it – you’ll get there! With a bit of practice, and our help at FilipinoPod101, you’ll soon have these family terms under the belt.

Family Shopping

3. How FilipinoPod101 Can Help You Learn Filipino Family Terms

We hope that we helped you expand your family in Filipino vocabulary!

FilipinoPod101, with its innovative online learning system, stands out among online learning platforms to help you master Filipino easily.

Our lessons are tailored not only to increase your language skills, but to also inform you of Filipino culture, including the Filipino family structure.

When you sign up, you will get instant access to tools like:

1 – An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
2 – A new Filipino word to learn every day
3 – Quick access to the Filipino Key Phrase List
4 – A free Filipino online dictionary
5 – The excellent 100 Core Filipino Word List
6 – An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

Further speed up your learning with the help of a personal tutor, who will first assess your current Filipino language abilities to personalize your training and tailor it to your needs.

Hard work always pays off, and to help you in this, FilipinoPod101 will be there every step of the way toward your Filipino mastery!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Family Phrases in Filipino

Answers: 1.i. 2.f. 3.r. 4.w. 5.l. 6.o. 7.y. 8.j. 9.a. 10.c. 11.u. 12.z. 13.k. 14.b. 15.g 16.x. 17.h. 18.m. 19.d. 20.e. 21.n. 22.p. 23.q. 24.s. 25.t. 26.v.

FilipinoPod101’s Essential Filipino Travel Phrase Guide

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Traveling to foreign countries is nearly always an exciting, enriching, and beneficial experience. Yet, some things can be real downers, such as boredom on a lengthy flight to Philippines. Really, binge-watching onboard movies can only be interesting for so long! And jet lag – another huge downer. Did you know that jet lag is more severe when you travel from the West to the East?

Well, we won’t know how to beat that, but there are fortunately plenty of remedies around to investigate.

To beat flight boredom, though, we may have the answer for you at FilipinoPod101! Why don’t you take the time to study Filipino travel phrases? We make this super easy and fun, with great downloadables, like our PDF Cheat Sheets. Quickly memorize these, and impress your Filipino friends or travel guide with your flawless Filipino!

Table of Contents

  1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases
  2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words
  3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases
  4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country
  5. FilipinoPod101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

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1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases

Impressing Filipino people or your travel partners will be the least of the benefits you reap from learning these helpful phrases. These are greater ones:

1) Eliminate Travel Frustration: First of all, you’ll be able to cut out a good chunk of travel frustration and inconvenience due to language barriers.

Know how to pronounce and use at least the basic Filipino phrases, and then just look foreign. This should go a long way to help you get by and win you friends, because locals would be more inclined to help someone who took the trouble to learn a smidgen of their language.

Injured Woman In An Ambulance

2) Emergency Readiness: In case of an emergency, you will be able to get help a lot quicker if you know how to ask for what in Filipino. Imagine miming to a doctor or nurse that you have a sore ear but that you’re allergic to penicillin. Not so easy, right?

Rather, you should know basic emergency travel phrases, especially if you suffer from a serious condition. Also, information about life-threatening allergies you have should always be on your person in the language of the country you’re visiting.

3) Sight-Seeing Readiness: Hopefully, you also travel to learn more about a country’s culture. Visiting the main tourist sites in Philippines will be more interesting if you know how to ask pertinent questions in Filipino.

In this blog, we’ll also be giving you important travel phrases to consider – from the 13 essential must-have phrases to ones that are just generally useful and good to know.

Let’s get cracking!

2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words

Preparing to Travel

Seasoned explorers of multiple countries will tell you that certain words and phrases are absolute must-knows in anyone’s travel vocabulary. Learning from them, we collated some of the most essential ones here for you.

If you know these travel phrases and words by heart in Filipino, you will be much better equipped for your visit than most of your movie-binging travel mates.

1) Salamat (Thank you)

As a tourist, you will be relying on the kindness of strangers to get by. Repay them with a small acknowledgment of their friendly generosity – know how to say “thank you” in Filipino.

2) Nagsasalita ka ba ng Ingles? (Do you speak English?)

While it may be a bit of a cop-out, sometimes you just can’t figure out how to communicate. Maybe you’re blanking on one specific word you need, maybe they’re speaking with a heavy accent, or maybe it’s just really late and you really want to get to the hotel. In that case, try asking if they speak English, and hopefully you can make things a little bit simpler for yourself.

Don’t abuse this phrase, though! If you just try to get by without learning any of the local language, not only will you not learn anything – you’ll be out of luck if they can’t speak English!

Man Greeting Someone

3) May bus ba mula airport papuntang siyudad? (Is there a bus from the airport to the city?)

Public transit is usually cheaper, if slower, than taking a taxi or rideshare. Use this phrase to see if you can get where you’re going when you’re strapped for cash, or just when you’d like to take the scenic route into town!

4) Ito ba ang tamang bus papuntang airport? (Is this the right bus for the airport?)

Likewise, if you’re the kind of person who can get themselves moving early (or maybe you just have a late flight), maybe you want to take the bus to the airport rather than taking a cab. If that’s the case, you’ll want to be sure you’re actually heading the right way! You wouldn’t want to end up at a lookout point half an hour away, watching your flight take off in the distance, would you?

5) Excuse me, magkano po ang pamasahe? (Excuse me, what’s the fare?)

If you are paying for a cab, you’ll want to know how much. Most legal taxis will have meters, but when dealing with a currency you’re not familiar with, it can be worth asking just to double check that you’re paying the right amount – especially if the currency has cents.

6) May reservation ako (I have a reservation)

This one you can expect to use at least a few times throughout your trip, unless you’re the kind of person who travels by the seat of their pants and just goes to whatever hotel, motel, or hostel has rooms available.

7) Meron ba kayong bakanteng kwarto ngayong gabi? (Do you have any vacancies tonight?)

If that’s the case, you’ll definitely be using this phrase instead. Quite possibly a lot, depending on how lucky you are!

Couple with a Map

8 ) Saan ang istasyon ng tren? (Where is the train station?)

If you’re in a country with an expansive commuter rail system (or maybe just a fan of other types of locomotives), you may want to know where the closest station is. Just don’t go looking for pennies on the rails!

9) May allergy ako sa mani (I am allergic to peanuts)

Replace “peanuts” with whatever the word for your allergen may be. If your allergy is serious, you probably already know the importance of stating this very clearly in Filipino.

If the condition is life-threatening, be sure to have a letter or prescription from a medical professional in Filipino on your person at all times. Consider getting a medical alert bracelet specially made in Filipino if your stay will be longer than a month or so.

Person Declining Meat

10) Mayroon ba kayong kahit anong vegetarian na pagkain? (Do you have any vegetarian dishes?)

If you dislike eating certain things, or you have certain dietary restrictions, it would be best if you knew how to convey this clearly in Filipino.

Remember, though, that saying “I’m vegan” or “I’m diabetic” may not be enough to get you what you want. The rules for veganism and vegetarianism are not standard everywhere in the world. Also, your patron might not understand what “diabetic” means. If you have a medical condition, it would be best to research some in-depth vocabulary beforehand.

11) Pwede ba akong kumuha ng mapa? (Could I get a map?)

Planning on exploring your destination? Hopelessly lost? Maybe just an amateur cartographer? No matter the reason, this phrase is sure to come in handy. That said, you’re more likely to get use out of it at some sort of tourist or travel center than you are asking a random passerby on the street.

12) Magkano ‘to? (How much is this?)

Even if you’re not a big shopper, you’re probably going to need this phrase at some point. Knowing how to count in Filipino will, of course, help a lot with purchases too.

13) Tumatanggap ba kayo ng credit card? (Do you take credit card?)

This is another travel phrase that will smooth your monetary transactions considerably.

Man Giving Credit Card to a Clerk

3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases

Travel Verbs

Unlike the previous phrases, these are not really essential so much as they are useful. Yet, knowing these will still smooth over some bumps on your journey, more than just knowing the crucial phrases would.

1) Libre ba ang Wi-Fi? (Is the Wi-Fi free?)

If you’re abroad, your normal cellular plans probably won’t have any service, and you’ll be totally reliant on publically available Wi-Fi while you’re out and about. Just ask a server, clerk, or attendant, and they’ll be happy to let you know. Just make sure you’re paying attention when they tell you the password!

2) Pwede niyo ba kong kunan ng litrato? (Could you take a picture of me please?)

What would a trip be with no photos to commemorate the event? Just be sure to ask this of someone who actually looks like they’d be willing to, unless you’re willing to risk being given the cold shoulder or worse. If you’re at a tourist attraction, you’ll find that most people are more than happy to take one for you, so long as you take one of them as well!

3) Meron ba kayong mare-recommend? (Do you have any recommendations?)

Eating alone in a restaurant? Or going out with new Filipino friends or business colleagues? Let them help you decide what to have.

4) Gusto ko ng non-smoking seat. (I’d like to have a non-smoking seat, please)

Though smoking has gone out of fashion in some places, it’s still popular in others. In the event you’re at a restaurant where smoking is allowed on premises, you can always ask this question to the staff and be seated elsewhere.

5) Tubig po (Water, please)

If you’ve emptied your glass, or are cutting yourself off after a few drinks, you can always ask for some water. It can be especially useful if the restaurant is busy to the point you need to call out to someone to get service.

6) Pwede ko na bang kunin ang bill? (Could I have the check?)

To finish off the restaurant related phrases, if you’re eating with friends or really want to impress your colleagues, taking the bill can be a nice treat for them. Of course, this phrase could come in handy as well if you’re eating alone and you’re just impatient to leave.

7) Anong maire-recommend mong souvenir? (What do you recommend for a souvenir?)

Now that your trip is over, what better way to cap it all off than a memento, or maybe a gift for friends and family at home? It’ll be nicer to have something recommended by the locals than a cheap bauble from the airport store, so go ahead and ask someone you’ve met what they think.

4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country

Survival Phrases

When traveling, it’s possible to keep communication smooth when you don’t share a language.

Do so by keeping these five tips in mind. They are aimed to help you communicate with those who cannot speak English very well, and also to keep your traveling experience pleasant!

1. Keep your English simple and easy to understand.
If the person you are talking to speaks very little English, use basic verbs, adjectives, and nouns, and keep sentences short.

However, don’t patronize them by talking in pidgin or like you would address a child. Keep your speech simple but natural, and use the correct grammar.

For instance, don’t say: “You come when?”. If you say: “When will you come?”, you will very likely be understood, and may even help someone who wants to improve their English.

2. Ask someone to write information down.
Apply Rule 1 first at your hotel, where the staff is very likely to be able to speak some English. Get them to write down, in their native language, things like: “I would like to go to the airport, please,” “Please take me to the beach,” or “Where is the closest bathroom?”

These written questions are something you can then give to taxi drivers or any other people who are willing and able to help you. This simple step could make your life a lot easier when you travel to a foreign country!

3. Avoid asking leading questions!
If you want the correct information from a non-native English speaker, that is.

When you need directions, for instance, don’t ask: “To get to the bus stop, do I need to turn left here?” If the person didn’t really understand you, you will probably just get a smile and a “Yes,” which could possibly make you miss your bus.

Rather, you should ask: “Where is the bus stop?” If they understand you, you will get the correct directions.

4. Pick the right person to ask for help.
Time to look at people and think a bit about their appearance! A younger person who looks like they might be a student is more likely to have English skills than the friendly but ancient lady smiling at you from a fruit stall.

If you don’t see anyone like that, head into town to the nearest bank, hospital, pharmacy, or hotel. The staff at those places usually speak a bit of English.

5. Know when to quit.
If you stuck to the above rules, but the person you are talking to only stares at you blankly, say thank you and leave. Hanging around hoping someone will suddenly understand and respond is just wasting your time, and may irritate them as well. Go find someone else.

5. FilipinoPod101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

So, reader, have you found this article helpful?

Do you feel comfortable enough to use some essential travel phrases in Filipino? We’d also love to hear if you think we left out important travel phrases. Leave your suggestions and opinions in the comments!

FilipinoPod101 takes the lead with many free learning tools to help you master Filipino reading and speaking easily, and in fun ways.

These tools include:

– An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
– A new Filipino word to learn every day
– Quick access to the Filipino Key Phrase List
– A free Filipino online dictionary
– The excellent 100 Core Filipino Word List
– An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

You will also have access to topic-specific recordings like our Before You Travel: Survival Phrases lesson.

Learn even more efficiently with the help of a personal tutor, after taking an assessment test to personalize and tailor your training.

Getting a tutor is also a good option if you meet challenges in your learning, or need to fast-track correct pronunciation and diction. Your very own friendly, Filipino-speaking teacher will be only a text away on a special app, anywhere, anytime – an excellent option for business persons!

Using a guided learning system that was developed by experts in language and online education, you’ll receive personal feedback and constant support to improve in no time. You’ll also be tasked with weekly assignments in reading, writing, and speaking to hone your Filipino speaking skills.

Imagine how impressed your Filipino friends or colleagues will be when you display your excellent conversational skills! With FilipinoPod101, getting there will be easy and fun.

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How to Use Filipino Numbers for Daily Usage

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Especially if you’re planning a prolonged visit to Philippines, using the correct Filipino numbers for counting in Filipino could be very important! Number systems are the other alphabet in any language. In fact, it is a language all of its own, and it serves a multitude of excellent purposes.

Table of Contents

  1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems
  2. Why is it Important to Learn Filipino Numbers?
  3. Learning Filipino Numbers
  4. Why Choose FilipinoPod101 to Learn all about Filipino Numbers?

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1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems

Abacus

1. The Ishango Bone

The origin of counting, and with it numbers, is not clear to historians. While their art showed that prehistoric man had a concept of numbers, the first indication of a formal system was found to be only between 20,000 and 35,000 thousand years old. This discovery came around 1960 in the form of the so-called Ishango Bone found in the Congo, Central Africa.

The 10cm/4 inch piece of bone was a fibula from a baboon. It showed markings with a neat, unified pattern of small lines – far too organized and sophisticated to have formed spontaneously. Archeologists believe that those thin markings were carved to keep score of, or count, something. The lines seemed to represent a sequence of prime numbers and a series of duplications. Some even called it the first-ever pocket calculator!

2. Mesopotamia and Greece

Yet, evidence suggests that it wasn’t until about 4,000 years ago that humans truly started counting and using numbers. Together with the development of civilization came developed agriculture, and the need for measurement and score-keeping was increased.

For this reason, a formal number system and mathematics were developed first in the Middle East, in what was then called Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia was roughly situated in the area of modern-day Iraq and Kuwait. Allegedly, the system was pretty simple at first. Citizens used tokens that represented a certain number of items, such as one token equalling four goats, etc. This eventually evolved into a system of score marks pressed into clay, which ultimately went on to influence Greek mathematics.

3. Hindu-Arabic Numbers

Zero, meanwhile, was conceived later and elsewhere. Inspired by the Hindu religion, which allows for the concept of infinity and eternity, the Indians invented a symbol to represent nothing. The magic of the zero lies not in itself but its combination with other numbers.

The Indians were also the creators of today’s numbers, which are often referred to as Hindu-Arabic numbers. These comprise one or a combination of just ten symbols or digits: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 0.

Europe learned of this numeric system only around 1200 A.D., when they were introduced to it by an Italian mathematician called Leonardo Pisano Bigollo.

Pisano, also known as Fibonacci, is famous for the discovery of a mathematical sequence with countless applications. Yes, math buffs, it’s the well-known Fibonacci sequence, also called the Golden Mean.

The Roman numeric system, which was clumsy next to the newer inventions, gradually lost popularity in the West. It’s from here that they “slowly spread to conquer the world,” as Steven Law puts it.

2. Why is it Important to Learn Filipino Numbers?

For us at FilipinoPod101, this is an easy question to answer! Because we know that numbers are a global unifier.

Counting and numbers have made our lives easier since they were first formulated, even in their most primitive forms.

Numbers in Industry

Without knowing your numbers, you can’t properly communicate about or deal with the following:

1) Your date/time of birth, i.e., your age: This is vital information to be able to give to people like doctors, employers, law enforcement, and so forth.

2) Banking: Worldwide, our monetary systems are built on numbers. Interest, credit scores, and loans all rely on math beyond simple finger counting.

3) Time: Without knowing how to say numbers, you can’t talk or ask about the time and expect to get a useful response. You don’t want to miss an appointment or schedule something for the wrong hour!

4) Ordering data: Numbers bring order to a mostly random life! Scientists even say that numbers and the way they are organized underpin the whole universe. From using them to count your meals’ calories and the number of likes your posts get on social media, to drawing up intricate data charts and explaining existence itself – numbers are what makes these things possible.

All of the above and more are reasons why it is important to know your numbers if you plan on travelling or becoming a foreign worker abroad, in Philippines or anywhere else!

Little Girl Counting

3. Learning Filipino Numbers

Now, let’s explore the Filipino number system a bit more! Take a look at this infographic.

Language Numbers

Can you make out for yourself what the Filipino numbers between one (1) and nine (9) look and sound like? Easy, right?

Or, if you struggled a bit, no problem. Why not listen to how Filipino numbers one (1) through ten (10) sound when pronounced by our native Filipino speaker and friendly FilipinoPod101 teacher?

Then, share with us in the comments your native language’s romanized pronunciation of your number system. We’d love to see all the different ways the same numbers can be pronounced!

Hand With a Thumbs Up

When you have mastered the first ten numbers, you have basically nailed the most significant part of the number system. Well done! Curious to learn the numbers from eleven upward? No problem! Why not subscribe and enroll with us now to immediately enjoy this lesson, teaching you all about Filipino numbers eleven (11) to one hundred (100)?

Finally, if you’re curious how the numbers look once you’ve broken one hundred, why not check out our Filipino number vocabulary page? You can see the numbers we’ve just covered, all the way up to four thousand (4,000). Plus, you can also see the Filipino words for different numbers used in example sentences, to get an idea of how you can use them in your day-to-day conversations!

4. Why Choose FilipinoPod101 to Learn all about Filipino Numbers?

FilipinoPod101, like all Innovative Language Learning ventures, takes the pain out of learning a new language by adding a lot of fun. It’s never an easy thing to learn a new language, but we formulated all your lessons so they’re nicely bite-sized, and geared to keep you motivated!

Also, we created a great number of fantastic tools to help keep struggle and boredom out of the learning process.

  • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn – what a beautiful cycle! FilipinoPod101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective, and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect with! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Filipino!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android, and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Filipino with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account – for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Filipino dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about FilipinoPod101…!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. You can have your very own Filipino teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to – what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Filipino word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Filipino level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

So, why wait? Sign up with FilipinoPod101 right away! Also, let us know in the comments if you’ve used this blog post, or any of the free lessons anywhere to master Filipino numbers. Or, even better – share your birthdate using what you’ve learned!

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How To Post In Perfect Filipino on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Filipino, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Filipino.

At Learn Filipino, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Filipino in the process.

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1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Filipino

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Filipino. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Juan eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Juan’s post.

Masarap kumain kapag kasama ang barkada!
“It’s fun to eat when together with the gang!”

1- Masarap kumain

First is an expression meaning “It’s fun to eat.”
We use this expression to say that an action is fun to do. By changing the verb, this expression can be used for other things such as traveling or shopping.

2- kapag kasama ang barkada

Then comes the phrase – “when together with the gang.”
Young adults in the Philippines usually go out to eat after work on Fridays because there’s no work the next day. They usually take pictures of the food they eat and ask the waiters to take group pictures of them inside the restaurant. Photos of food and groups of friends are some of the most common posts you will find on social media in the Philippines. Some people take home food from the restaurant as a souvenir for their family.

COMMENTS

In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

1- Mas masarap kumain kung kasama ako!

His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning – “It’s more fun if I’m there!”
Use this expression when you’re being humorous, but also feel a bit left out.

2- Ang yaman ni tito! Libre mo rin ako.

His girlfriend’s nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “Uncle is rich! Treat me too.”
This is another phrase that indicates you feel a bit left out, and wish you could be included.

3- So hindi masarap kumain sa bahay?

His girlfriend, Ana, uses an expression meaning – “So it’s not fun to eat at home?”
Use this expression if you’re perhaps feeling a bit insulted that the poster eats out, as opposed to at home, but it could be meant humorously too.

4- Sa susunod sama rin kami!

His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning – “Next time, we’ll join too!”
Use this expression when you are feeling optimistic that you will be part of the party next time.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • barkada: “gang, group of friends”
  • kasama: “with, including”
  • tito: “uncle”
  • ilibre: “to be treated”
  • kumain: “eat”
  • bahay: “house”
  • sumama: “to join”
  • susunod: “next”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Filipino restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Filipino

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Filipino phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Ana shop with her sister at the mall, posts an image of them in the shop, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Maganda ba? Paki-comment.
    “Is it beautiful? Please comment.”

    1- Maganda ba?

    First is an expression meaning “Is it beautiful?”
    We ask this question when we want to know if something – clothes, movies, songs, etc, is good or beautiful. Filipinos often ask their friends for advice and post selfies with the items they’ve just bought on their social media sites.

    2- Paki-comment.

    Then comes the phrase – “Please comment”.
    Filipinos often borrow English words and expressions to use them in the context of Filipino grammar. You can find a lot of English words combined with Filipino words on social media.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ang ganda! Pang-ootd

    Her neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning – “Nice O.O.T.D. (Outfit Of The Day)!”
    Use this expression when you feel appreciative of the garment shown in the poster’s photo.

    2- Grabe! Ikaw na tita ang maganda.

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “Fine! You’re the pretty one, aunt.”
    Use this expression if you want to compliment the poster on her looks. Careful not to insult the sister, though!

    3- Alin? Yung damit o ikaw? Hehehe

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning – “Which one? The dress or you? Hahaha”
    Use this expression if you’re feeling humorous and want to tease the poster.

    4- Ganda talaga!

    Her boyfriend, Juan, uses an expression meaning – “Really nice!”
    Use this phrase to express appreciation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • maganda: “beautiful”
  • pang: “for”
  • ikaw na: “you’re the one “
  • alin: “which”
  • talaga: “really”
  • grabe: “super, over extreme, severe”
  • paki: “please”
  • tita: “aunt”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Filipino

    Sports events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunity for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Filipino.

    Juan plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of himself on the beach, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Ako dapat ang representative natin sa Olympics!
    “I should be our representative for the Olympics!”

    1- Ako dapat

    First is an expression meaning “I should.”
    This expression is used to suggest that we should be the person to perform an action. Filipinos are not shy on social media and often brag about themselves or volunteer themselves to do something challenging. For example, if someone were to post that they lost in a competition, many of their friends would comment that they should have been in the competition instead. However, most of these comments are not taken seriously and considered to be jokes.

    2- ang representative natin sa Olympics

    Then comes the phrase – “be our representative in the Olympics.”
    The Olympics is a very popular event in the Philippines, and many Filipinos root for the country winning its first gold medal. It won one gold medal for junior archery in the 2014 Nanjing Summer Olympics. Filipino athletes have earned a total of 102 medals for the summer games but has yet to receive gold.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Weh? Di nga?

    His nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “Oh? Really?”
    Use this expression to challenge the poster’s comment.

    2- Yan pala ang trip mo pre.

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning – “So that’s what you’re into, bro.”
    Use this expression when you are feeling frivolous, and just to be part of the conversation.

    3- Kapal!

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning – “Thick-skinned!”
    Use this expression when you want to give an opinion about the poster’s attitude.

    4- Pogi!

    His girlfriend, Ana, uses an expression meaning – “Handsome!”
    Use this expression to compliment the poster on their good looks.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ako: “I”
  • natin: “our”
  • pre: “bro / brother (casual reference of a male speaker to his male friend)”
  • kapal: “thick, thick-skinned (used to describe the action of someone shamelessly promoting or bragging about himself/herself)”
  • pogi: “handsome”
  • di nga: “really? “
  • weh: “oh (used to express doubt)”
  • dapat: “should”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Filipino

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Ana shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Fav song ko na to!
    “This is now my favorite song!”

    1- fav song ko na

    First is an expression meaning “now my favorite song.”
    This expression can be used to talk about your favorite things simply by changing the noun.

    2- to

    Then comes the phrase – “this.”
    Filipinos often share their emotions on social media by posting songs that reflect their moods. Aside from selfies or group photos, sharing songs and videos are among the top posts you’ll find on Philippine social media. Some Filipinos like making their own videos on YouTube and adding their favorite songs to the background. Others will make music videos with their partner’s pictures, sometimes even adding their own quotes to the video, as a symbol of their love.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Gawin nating theme song.

    Her boyfriend, Juan, uses an expression meaning – “Let’s make this our theme song.”
    Use this expression when you’re feeling romantic and wish to give special meaning to the song.

    2- Hindi ako maka-relate.

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “I can’t relate.”
    Use this expression when you want to share your personal, negative opinion about the song.

    3- Ang daming feelings!

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning – “The feels!”
    Use this expression to indicate that you like the song, and that it touches you.

    4- Ang ganda ng kanta!

    Her neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning – “The song is beautiful!”
    Use this expression when you wish to compliment the song.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • fav: “favorite”
  • gawin: “to make”
  • maka: “to (added before a verb to express the ability to perform that verb)”
  • dami: “many”
  • kanta: “song”
  • hindi: “not, no”
  • na: “already”
  • to (ito): “this”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Filipino Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in Filipino!

    Juan goes to a concert, posts an image of the crowd, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Sobrang saya ng concert!
    “The concert was super fun!”

    1- sobrang saya

    First is an expression meaning “super fun.”
    We use this expression to describe something or someone as being very happy or great fun.

    2- ng concert

    Then comes the phrase – “the concert.”
    Concerts are popular in the Philippines. Many live bands play in restaurants at night, especially on Fridays and weekends, catering to young adults that are off from work. Here, customers can request the songs they want the band to play. They can also ask to sing or play together with the band. These live performances usually end late, some even continuing on until 1 or 2 AM.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ayos!

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning – “That’s good!”
    Use this expression to show that you approve of the post.

    2- Yun oh!

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning – “There it is!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic.

    3- Mabuti at nag-enjoy kayo.

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning – “Great, you enjoyed it.”
    Use this expression to just comment and be part of the conversation in a benevolent, friendly way.

    4- Naks naman. Inggit much.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “How great. I envy you a lot.”
    Use this expression when you feel a bit jealous of the poster and his experience, but not in a nasty way.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • sobra: “super, too much”
  • ayos: “good, excellent, wonderful, fantastic”
  • yun oh!: “there it is! (used to express excitement about something or someone; used to emphasize something or someone)”
  • mabuti: “good”
  • kayo: “you (plural)”
  • naks: “good, great”
  • inggit: “envy, jealous”
  • saya: “fun, happy”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert , which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Filipino

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Filipino phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Ana accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Nasira ang phone ko!
    “My phone broke!”

    1- Nasira

    First is an expression meaning “broke.”
    We use this word to talk about things that are broken. For example, you can use it in reference to electronics, furniture, clothing, accessories, household items, etc.

    2- ang phone ko

    Then comes the phrase – “my phone.”
    Some words used on Filipino social media are borrowed from the English language, especially terms related to technology and the internet.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Naku! Anong nangyari?

    Her supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning – “Oh my! What happened?”
    Use this question to show your surprise and want to know the details of the accident.

    2- Nandito lang kami kung kailangan mo ng tulong.

    Her neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning – “We’re here if you need help.”
    Use this expression if you feel helpful.

    3- Sayang!

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “What a waste! (too bad)”
    Use this expression to comment with your opinion, and it’s also a way of expressing sympathy.

    4- Bakit nasira?

    Her boyfriend, Juan, uses an expression meaning – “Why did it break?”
    Ask this question if you would like more details about the incident, which is a nice way to keep the conversation going.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • nasira: “broke”
  • nangyari: “happened”
  • nandito: “here”
  • tulong: “help”
  • kailanganin: “to need”
  • sayang: “what a waste”
  • bakit: “why”
  • ano: “what”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to describe an accident in Filipino. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Filipino

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Filipino!

    Juan gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Walang magawa sa bahay…
    “Nothing to do at home….”

    1- walang magawa

    First is an expression meaning “nothing to do.”
    This expression indicates that the speaker is bored with his or her current situation and cannot do anything about it.

    2- sa bahay

    Then comes the phrase – “at home”.
    During hot seasons, most Filipinos stay at home to avoid the heat. Many tend to take afternoon naps. Children are also ordered to take afternoon naps during summer vacation. However, some people go out to the malls to cool themselves off and ease their boredom.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Sinabi mo pa!

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning – “You said it!”
    Use this expression to indicate that you’re feeling the same as the poster.

    2- Matulog ka na lang.

    His girlfriend, Ana, uses an expression meaning – “Just sleep.”
    Use this expression to give advice.

    3- Ako rin!

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning – “Me too!”
    This is another expression that shows you feel the same as the poster.

    4- Buti ka pa!

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning – “Good for you! (envious)”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • wala: “nothing”
  • bahay: “home, house”
  • sinabi: “to say”
  • rin: “too”
  • matulog: “to sleep”
  • buti: “good”
  • lang: “only”
  • sa: “at”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Filipino

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Filipino about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Ana feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Pagod! Grabe ang araw na to!
    “Tired! This day is just too much!”

    1- pagod

    First is an expression meaning “tired.”
    We use this word to express that we are tired or exhausted from doing something.

    2- grabe ang araw na to

    Then comes the phrase – “this day is too much.”
    We use this phrase when we feel especially tired compared to other days. Filipinos often say this when they’re exhausted from working overtime or getting stuck in traffic on the way home.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Galing sa work?

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning – “From work?”
    Ask this question if you want to know more details about the post.

    2- Pahinga ka na mahal.

    Her boyfriend, Juan, uses an expression meaning – “Rest already, dear.”
    Use this expression to show that you care, and want to advise your beloved to rest.

    3- Good job ngayong araw.

    Her supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning – “Good job today.”
    This is a compliment from the supervisor, which means he was pleased with her work.

    4- Gusto mo ng masahe tita?

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “Do you want a massage, aunt?”
    Use this expression to make a suggestion, indicating that you want to be helpful.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • grabe: “too much”
  • araw: “day”
  • magpahinga: “to rest/to relax”
  • pagod: “tired”
  • gusto: “to like/ to want”
  • masahe: “massage”
  • galing: “from”
  • ngayon: “now, today”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Filipino! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Filipino

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Filipino.

    Juan suffers an injury, posts an image of himself in pain, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Napilayan ako kanina. Ang sakit!
    “I sprained myself. It’s painful!”

    1- napilayan ako kanina

    First is an expression meaning “I sprained myself.”
    We use this expression to say that we hurt ourselves or sprained some part of our body.

    2- ang sakit

    Then comes the phrase – “it’s painful/ it hurts.”
    Filipino men typically get injured after playing basketball with their friends since basketball is one of the most popular sports in the country and almost all the men play it. Companies even encourage their employees to play basketball with their coworkers as a way of encouraging work and life balance.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Mag-ingat ka Juan. Kaya mo yan.

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning – “Take care, Juan. You can do it.”
    Use this expression to show your concern, and offer support.

    2- Ingat sa susunod.

    His neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning – “Be careful next time.”
    Use this expression to offer advice that also shows concern for the poster’s wellbeing.

    3- Huwag kang mag-alala bukas lang magaling ka na.

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning – “Don’t worry. Tomorrow you’ll be okay.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic that the injury is not too bad.

    4- Wala yan! Takbo pa!

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “That’s nothing! Come on, run!”
    Use this expression if you want to lift the poster’s spirit by making a bit of fun with him.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • kanina: “earlier, a little while ago”
  • pagaling: “to get well”
  • sa: “at”
  • huwag: “do not”
  • kaya: “able, can”
  • sakit: “painful”
  • tumakbo: “to run”
  • wala yan: “that’s nothing”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Filipino

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Ana feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Walang tigil ang ulan at nasaan ka araw?
    “The rain isn’t stopping, and where is the sun?”

    1- walang tigil ang ulan

    First is an expression meaning “the rain isn’t stopping.”
    When there is heavy rain or it seems like the rain won’t stop soon, we normally use this phrase.

    2- at nasaan ka araw

    Then comes the phrase – “and where is the sun?.”
    This phrase is from a popular Filipino song and is well-known by all generations. Filipinos have a habit of quoting relevant song lyrics when they post on social media websites. They also have a saying that sometimes the rain is caused by someone’s bad singing.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Itulog mo na lang yan.

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning – “Just sleep it off.”
    Use this expression to offer advice.

    2- Sisikat din ang araw.

    Her supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning – “The sun will shine too.”
    Use this expression to be supportive and positive.

    3- Kumanta ka kasi tita.

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “It’s because you sang, aunt.”
    Use this expression to make fun of the poster in a friendly, teasing way.

    4- Huwag kang mag-alala lilipas din yan.

    Her neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning – “Don’t worry, it’ll pass.”
    Use this expression if you want to remind the poster not to care too much.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • tumigil: “to stop”
  • ulan: “rain”
  • nasaan: “where”
  • itulog: “sleep it off”
  • sumikat: “to shine, to rise”
  • kumanta: “to sing”
  • kasi: “because”
  • lumipas: “to pass”
  • How would you comment in Filipino when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Filipino

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Juan changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Sa wakas! Sinagot na niya ‘ko!
    “Finally! She said yes!”

    1- sa wakas

    First is an expression meaning “finally.”
    This phrase is used when a long-awaited event finally materializes.

    2- sinagot na niya ‘ko

    Then comes the phrase – “He/She answered me already.”
    Filipino men normally court and confess to women. Women can also confess to men, but normally it’s the other way around. A traditional way of courting is by serenading a woman. However, these days some couples end up together through messaging on social media sites or sending text messages.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Swerte mo pare! Inuman mamaya!

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning – “Man, you’re lucky! Drinks later!”
    Use this expression if you’re feeling appreciative of the poster’s new status, and want to celebrate it.

    2- Magandang balita! Congrats sa inyong dalawa!

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning – “Good news! Congratulations to you two.”
    Use this expression to congratulate the couple in a more traditional way.

    3- OMG! Super bagay kayong dalawa!

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning – “Oh my God! You suit each other!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling enthusiastic and optimistic about the relationship match.

    4- Dapat ilibre mo kami tito!

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “Uncle, you should treat us!”
    Use this expression to show you want to celebrate the event.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • wakas: “end, final”
  • suwerte, swerte: “lucky”
  • inuman: “drink, drinking party”
  • mamaya: “later”
  • balita: “news”
  • dalawa: “two”
  • manlibre: “to treat someone”
  • sinagot: “to answer, to accept the person as a partner or lover”
  • What would you say in Filipino when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news – don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Filipino

    Wow, so things got serious quickly, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Filipino.

    Ana is getting married today, so she eaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Hindi ako makapaniwala! Kasal ko na ngayon!
    “I can’t believe it! It’s my wedding day!”

    1- hindi ako makapaniwala

    First is an expression meaning “I can’t believe it.”
    We say this when something amazing or unbelievable has happened.

    2- kasal ko na ngayon

    Then comes the phrase – “It’s my wedding today.”
    Filipino weddings are almost the same as Western weddings. The bride normally wears a white gown and the groom a suit. Weddings can take place in church, at the beach, at the park, or anywhere the couple wishes to conduct their marriage ceremony.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Akin ang bouquet ha?

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning – “The bouquet is mine, okay?”
    Use this expression if you feel humorous. It is the tradition at many weddings for the bride to throw her bouquet to specifically the unmarried female guests. The one who catches it is believed to be the next bride.

    2- Ako ang pinakamaswerteng lalaki sa mundo ngayon!

    Her husband, Juan, uses an expression meaning – “I’m the luckiest man in the world today!”
    Use this expression to indicate your pride and happiness to be the groom of the poster.

    3- Pagkahaba-haba man ng prusisyon, sa simbahan din ang tuloy!

    Her supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning – “(proverb) No matter how long the procession is, it always ends up in a church!”
    This is an old proverb often used to refer to couples getting married.

    4- Kayo na talaga ang para sa isa’t-isa!

    Her college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning – “You’re really meant to be with each other!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling positive about the match.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • kasal: “wedding”
  • pinakamaswerte: “luckiest”
  • akin: “mine”
  • pagkahaba-haba: “very long”
  • simbahan: “church”
  • isa’t-isa: “each other”
  • prusisyon: “procession”
  • tumuloy: “to continue”
  • How would you respond in Filipino to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Filipino

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Filipino.

    Juan finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of him and Ana together, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Magiging tatay na ako!
    “I’m going to be a father!”

    1- magiging

    First is an expression meaning “will become” or “going to be”
    This is used to express the future state or of something becoming.

    2- tatay na ako

    Then comes the phrase – “to be a father”
    Filipino couples invite their closest friends to be the godmother or godfather of their babies. Usually, a child has more than one godparent, and typically there should be an equal number of male and female godparents. The godparents’ duties are mostly to give presents to the child on their birthdays and on Christmas Day.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Napakagandang balita! Congrats!

    His neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning – “Very good news! Congratulations!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling positive about the news, and wish the new parents well.

    2- Siguradong magiging mabuting tatay ka!

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning – “You sure are going to be a great dad!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic about the poster’s fathering potential.

    3- Congrats sa inyong dalawa. Alagaan mo nang mabuti ang pamilya mo.

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning – “Congratulations to the both of you. Take good care of your family.”
    This is a traditional congratulatory phrase when a couple announce a pregnancy.

    4- Sana hindi mo kamukha tito.

    His nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “I hope the baby doesn’t look like you, uncle.”
    Use this expression when you are in a humorous mood and want to tease the father a bit.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • tatay: “father, dad”
  • napakaganda: “very beautiful”
  • sigurado: “sure”
  • maging: “to become”
  • maligayang bati: “congratulations”
  • alagaan: “to take care”
  • kamukha: “to look like, to resemble”
  • sana hindi: “I hope not”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Filipino Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Filipino.

    Ana plays with her baby, posts an image of the cherub, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Ang baby namin! Sino ang kamukha?
    “Our baby! Who does she look like?”

    1- ang baby namin

    First is an expression meaning “our baby.”
    Filipinos normally use the English word “baby” to refer to their newborns or young children.

    2- sino ang kamukha?

    Then comes the phrase – “who does he/she look like?.”
    When a child is born in the Philippines, friends and family usually debate over who the baby looks like. If the baby is cute, nearly everyone claims that the child takes after them.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Cuteness overload! Siyempre kamukha ni Mommy!

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning – “Very cute! Of course she looks like her mother!”
    Use this expression to indicate that you side with the mother in terms of the baby’s looks.

    2- Hindi na kailangang tanungin! Kamukha ko!

    Her husband, Juan, uses an expression meaning – “No need to ask! She looks like me!”
    Use this expression to indicate that you feel you are the parent who bestowed good looks on the child.

    3- Pare suko ka na! Cute yung bata eh.

    Her college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning – “Man, give up already! The baby is cute.”
    Use this expression to show your appreciation of the baby’s adorable appearance.

    4- Nakakawala ng pagod ang ngiti at tawa niya!

    Her neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning – “Her smile and laughter relieves me of stress!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • sino: “who”
  • siyempre: “of course”
  • tanungin: “to ask”
  • pare: “man, bro (used by a male speaker to call his male friend)”
  • nakakawala: “gets rid of”
  • pagod: “stress, tiredness”
  • ngiti: “smile”
  • tawa: “laugh”
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Filipino! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Filipino Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions – some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Juan goes to a family gathering, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Kumpleto ang pamilya!
    “The family is complete!”

    1- kumpleto ang

    First is an expression meaning “complete.”
    This is normally used as a caption for family group pictures during family reunions.

    2- pamilya

    Then comes the phrase – “family.”
    Many Filipino families have a tradition of throwing a family reunion during Christmas or New Year. Because most Filipino families are large, distant relatives come to town to visit their family members during these reunions. Many of the activities include singing karaoke, lighting fireworks, and eating and drinking.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Hindi! Wala yung aso tito!

    His nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “No! The dog isn’t there, uncle!”
    Use this expression when you are feeling humorous.

    2- Masaya kasama ang buong pamilya!

    His wife, Ana, uses an expression meaning – “It’s fun being with the whole family!”
    Use this expression to indicate your appreciation of the gathering.

    3- Ang ganda ng pamilya ninyo!

    His neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning – “Your family is beautiful!”
    This phrase compliments the good looks of the family members.

    4- Dapat talaga nagkikita nang madalas ang buong pamilya.

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning – “Families should really get together often.”
    Use this expression to share a positive opinion about family get-togethers.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • masaya kasama: “happy to be with, good to be with”
  • kumpleto: “complete”
  • aso: “dog”
  • hindi: “no”
  • magkita: “to meet”
  • madalas: “often”
  • buo: “whole”
  • talaga: “really”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Filipino

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know how to post and leave comments in Filipino about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Ana waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Excited na ako! Sana walang maging problema!
    “I’m excited! I hope there won’t be any problem!”

    1- excited ako

    First is an expression meaning “I’m excited”.
    Filipinos borrow the English word “excited” because there is no equivalent Filipino word that expresses this emotion.

    2- sana walang maging problema

    Then comes the phrase – “hope there won’t be any problem.”
    Since the Philippines is composed of around 7,000 islands, the only way to travel around the country is by plane. So when someone goes on a trip, many of their friends and relatives will wish and pray for their safety.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Enjoyin mo yan to the max!

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning – “Enjoy it to the max!”
    Use this expression to wish the poster full enjoyment of the holiday.

    2- Tita pasalubong ko ha. Salamat po!

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “Aunt, my souvenir, okay. Thank you!”
    Use this expression to indicate you’re expecting a gift when they’re back.

    3- Ingat sa biyahe.

    Her supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning – “Have a safe trip.”
    This is an old-fashioned, traditional way of wishing someone a good trip.

    4- Dapat sinama ninyo ako!

    Her college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning – “You should’ve taken me with you!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous, and wish you were part of the expedition.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ty: “thank you”
  • problema: “problem”
  • pasalubong: “souvenir”
  • ha: “okay”
  • mag-ingat: “to take care or caution”
  • biyahe: “trip”
  • sinama: “to be included, taken”
  • enjoyin: “to enjoy something”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Filipino!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Filipino

    So maybe you’re strolling around at a local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Filipino phrases!

    Juan finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Astig! Meron palang ganito!
    “Epic! Didn’t know there was something like this!”

    1- astig

    First is an expression meaning “epic.”
    This word is commonly used to express a person’s amazement about something or someone.

    2- meron palang ganito

    Then comes the phrase – “I didn’t know there was something like this”.
    When someone finds something peculiar, they say this phrase to express that it’s the first time they’ve seen something like it. Filipinos love to share the things they find with their friends on social media sites.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Lupit! Para saan yan?

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning – “Wow! What’s that for?”
    Use this expression to show you are impressed and would like to know more about the object.

    2- Hindi naman astig. Walang kwenta.

    His nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “Not cool. Worthless.”
    Use this expression when you don’t have a high opinion of the find.

    3- Siguradong magugustuhan din iyan ng pamilya mo.

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning – “Your family will also surely like that.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic the find will be worth something to the family.

    4- Minsan mas maganda pa talagang mamili sa palengke.

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning – “Sometimes it’s (really) nicer to shop at local stores.”
    Use this to express a personal opinion about shopping, if you’re feeling positive about the find.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • pala: “apparently “
  • lupit: “extreme, super, severe, unbelievable”
  • kwenta: “worth”
  • sigurado: “surely”
  • mamili: “to shop”
  • lokal: “local”
  • pamilihan: “store, market”
  • mas maganda: “better”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Filipino

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Filipino, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Ana visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    The best ang lugar na ito!
    “This place is the best!”

    1- da best

    First is an expression meaning “the best.”
    This expression is borrowed from English; however, the spelling for “the” is changed. This describes something or someone as being number one or the best at something.

    2- ang lugar na ito

    Then comes the phrase – “this place is.”
    When Filipinos go on vacation, the top two things they do are go shopping and take pictures for their social media sites.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Mabuti at nagustuhan mo mahal.

    Her husband, Juan, uses an expression meaning – “Glad that you liked it dear.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling determined.

    2- The best din yung kumuha ng litrato.

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning – “The person who took the picture is also the best.”
    Use this expression to be appreciative of the poster.

    3- Bakit ka nandyan tita? Anong meron?

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “Why are you there, aunt? What’s up?”
    Use this expression if you’re curious and want to know more about the poster’s whereabouts.

    4- Antayin ninyo! Pupuntahan ko rin iyan!

    Her college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning – “Just wait! I will go there too!”
    Use this expression to show you wish to also visit the place.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • da best: “the best”
  • lugar: “place”
  • kumuha: “to take”
  • anong meron: “what’s up”
  • antayin: “to wait”
  • litrato: “picture”
  • nandiyan: “there”
  • pupuntahan: “to go”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Filipino

    So you’re doing nothing yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Filipino!

    Juan relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Pahinga din pag may time
    “Relax when you have the time.”

    1- magpahinga din

    First is an expression meaning “relax”.
    Filipinos love to rest. There is a tradition of taking an afternoon nap whenever someone has the time. Children, especially, are expected to take an afternoon nap.

    2- pag may time

    Then comes the phrase – “when you have the time.”
    This expression is commonly used on social media by yuppies or young professionals to express that a person should do something if they have extra free time.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Tama! Mahalagang alagaan ang kalusugan.

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning – “Right! It’s important to take care of your health”.
    Use this expression to be old fashioned.

    2- Iba talaga kapag mayaman!

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning – “It’s really different when you’re rich!”
    Use this expression to share the personal opinion that only the rich can relax well.

    3- Naks naman ang daming time ni tito! Pahingi ako.

    His nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “Wow! Uncle has a lot of time! Give me some.”
    Use this expression when you’re envious that the poster has the time to relax.

    4- Mabuti iyan para sa inyong mag-asawa.

    His neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning – “That’s good for the two of you.”
    Use this expression when you’re happy that the poster has the opportunity to rest.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • magpahinga: “to relax”
  • din: “too”
  • pag: “when”
  • tama: “right, correct”
  • mahalaga: “important”
  • kalusugan: “health”
  • iba: “different”
  • mayaman: “rich”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Filipino When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Ana returns home after a vacation, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Nandito na kami!
    “We’re here!”

    1- nandito na

    First is an expression meaning “are here.”
    This expression is very useful, especially when you want to inform your friends that you have arrived at home or at your meeting place.

    2- kami

    Then comes the phrase – “we.”
    Filipinos usually inform their friends and loved ones whenever they’re going away on a trip or when they have come back from one since everyone is expecting to hear stories about their adventure.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Maligayang pagdating!

    Her neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning – “Welcome back!”
    This is the traditional welcoming when people return from a trip.

    2- Salamat sa Diyos at nakabalik kayo nang maayos.

    Her supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning – “Thank God you came back safely.”
    Use this expression to indicate your happiness about the poster’s safe return.

    3- Kailan kayo bumalik? Balitaan mo ako!

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning – “When did you come back? Update me!”
    The question indicates that you wish to know more details, and want the conversation to go on.

    4- Asan na ang pasalubong ko?

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “Where’s my souvenir?”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • nandito na: “already here”
  • pagdating: “arrival”
  • salamat: “thanks”
  • bumalik: “to return”
  • maayos: “well”
  • kailan: “when”
  • balitaan: “to inform, to tell”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a public commemoration day such as Independence Day?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Filipino

    It’s an historic day and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Juan watches Independence Day fireworks show, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Maligayang araw ng kalayaan!
    “Happy Independence Day!”

    1- maligayang

    First is an expression meaning “happy.”
    This phrase is used to greet people on the Philippine Independence Day on June 12. The Philippine flag is raised simultaneously at several locations in the country.

    2- araw ng kalayaan

    Then comes the phrase – “Independence Day.”
    During Independence Day, most Filipinos put up a flag at their house, children usually wave flags around, and most stores give them away to their customers. Because Independence Day is a non-working holiday in the Philippines, some families go to Rizal Park in Manila to see the Independence Day parade and ceremony.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ganoon din sa iyo.

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning – “Same to you.”
    Use this expression to return the poster’s wish.

    2- Talaga bang malaya na tayo?

    His nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “Are we truly free?”
    This is a philosophical question that could indicate you’re not feeling optimistic about your freedom.

    3- Mabuhay ang Pilipinas!

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning – “Hooray for the Philippines!”
    This is a traditional exclamation on Independence Day.

    4- Cheers! Para sa mga susunod pang taon!

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning – “Cheers! For the next years!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic and enthusiastic.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • kalayaan: “independence, freedom”
  • malaya: “free”
  • tayo: “we”
  • mabuhay: “to live”
  • Pilipinas: “Philippines”
  • ng: “of”
  • ang: “the”
  • taon: “year”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    Independence Day and other public commemoration days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Filipino

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Ana goes to her birthday party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Maraming salamat sa lahat ng bumati sa akin ngayong birthday ko!
    “Many thanks to all the people who greeted me today on my birthday!”

    1- maraming salamat sa lahat ng

    First is an expression meaning “many thanks to all who.”
    Most Filipinos put their birthday information in public view on their social media websites so all of their friends can send them greetings on their birthdays.

    2- bumati sa akin ngayong birthday ko

    Then comes the phrase – “greeted me today on my birthday.”
    Most Filipinos celebrate their birthdays. Children invite all their friends and relatives to their birthday party either at home, at school, or at restaurants. Adults usually celebrate their birthday with their friends and loved ones. Friends and relatives are supposed to bring a present when they are invited to a birthday party.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Walang anuman.

    Her college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning – “You’re welcome.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous.

    2- Tumanda ka na ng isang taon ngayong araw tita!

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “You’re one year older today aunt!”
    Use this expression to make conversation in a humorous way, teasing the poster a bit about her age.

    3- Maligayang kaarawan!

    Her supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning – “Happy Birthday!”
    This is the traditional birthday wish.

    4- HBD! Masaya ako para sayo.

    Her neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning – “Happy Birthday! I’m happy for you.”
    A variation on the traditional birthday wish that also indicate your happiness for the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • lahat: “all”
  • bumati: “to greet”
  • walang anuman: “you’re welcome”
  • tumanda: “to get older”
  • isang taon: “one year”
  • maligayang kaarawan: “happy birthday”
  • HBD: “Happy Birthday”
  • para sayo: “for you”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Filipino

    Impress your friends with your Filipino New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Juan celebrates the New Year, posts an image of the festivities, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Maligayang bagong taon!
    “Happy New Year!”

    1- maligayang

    First is an expression meaning “happy”.
    This expression is used to greet everyone during the new year in the Philippines. People usually say this to those they meet during the last week of December to the first week of January.

    2- bagong taon

    Then comes the phrase – “New Year.”
    New Year’s celebrations in the Philippines are very lively. People normally light up fireworks, sing karaoke, eat a variety of foods, and play loud music. Neighborhoods are filled with loud music and noise from New Year’s Eve until the end of January 1st. Filipinos do a countdown and have a tradition of jumping at exactly 0:00 in the belief that they will grow taller if they do so.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Manigong bagong taon sa iyo at sa iyong pamilya.

    His supervisor, Bong, uses an expression meaning – “Happy New Year to you and to your family.”
    This is a traditional well-wish for New Year.

    2- Yehey! Bagong taon! Tara tagay tayo!

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning – “Hooray! New Year! Let’s cheers!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous and enthusiastic about the New Year.

    3- Sana maging mabuti ang bagong taon na ito!

    His high school friend, Liza, uses an expression meaning – “Let’s hope this year will be a good year!”
    Use this expression to share your hope for a good year ahead.

    4- Paalam sa nakaraang taon! Hello sa bagong taon!

    His wife, Ana, uses an expression meaning – “Goodbye to last year! Hello to the New Year!”
    Use these phrases to indicate you let the past go, and greet the future optimistically.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • bago: “new”
  • manigong: “prosperous”
  • pamilya: “family”
  • yehey: “hooray”
  • tagay: “cheers”
  • tayo: “we, us”
  • paalam: “goodbye”
  • nakaraang: “past, previous”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Filipino

    What will you say in Filipino about Christmas?

    Ana celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Ana’s post.

    Maligayang Pasko sa inyong lahat!
    “Merry Christmas to all of you!”

    1- maligayang pasko

    First is an expression meaning “Merry Christmas.”
    We use this to wish people a Merry Christmas in the Philippines.

    2- sa inyong lahat

    Then comes the phrase – “to all of you.”
    Since the Philippines is about 90% Catholic, a majority of Filipinos celebrate Christmas. People usually go to midnight mass for nine days beginning on December 16 and attend a special mass on Christmas day. People believe that if they complete the entire nine-day midnight mass their wishes will come true. On Christmas Day people visit their relatives and children ask for presents from their godparents and relatives. Filipinos also put up colorful lanterns and lights outside their houses and put up Christmas decorations.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Ana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Tita huwag ninyong kalimutan ang regalo ko!

    Her nephew, Sam, uses an expression meaning – “Aunt, don’t forget about my gift!”
    Use this expression to show you have a serious wish for a gift from the poster.

    2- Maligayang Pasko din sa inyo!

    Her neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning – “Merry Christmas to you too!”
    This is the traditional response when someone addresses you with a Christmas greeting.

    3- Tara simbang gabi tayo!

    Her college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning – “Let’s go to a midnight mass!”
    Use this expression to make a suggestion for Christmas Eve.

    4- Maligayang Pasko! Tara shopping tayo ang daming sale sa mall!

    Her high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning – “Merry Christmas! Let’s go shopping, lots of sales at the mall!”
    Use this expression if you want to go Christmas shopping with the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • Pasko: “Christmas”
  • kalimutan: “to forget”
  • regalo: “present”
  • ko: “my”
  • inyo: “you, yours”
  • simbang gabi: “Midnight mass (nine consecutive days before Christmas Day)”
  • tara: “let’s go”
  • daming: “many”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Filipino

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Filipino phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Juan celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Juan’s post.

    Maligayang anibersaryo mahal!
    “Happy anniversary, dear!”

    1- maligayang anibersaryo

    First is an expression meaning “Happy anniversary.”
    We use this expression to greet people on their anniversary day.

    2- mahal

    Then comes the phrase – “dear.”
    Couples usually celebrate their anniversary together. The Philippines is the only country in the world (excluding Vatican) where divorce is illegal. So couples normally celebrate their anniversary without fail every year. When people marry in the Philippines it is literally “till death do us part”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Juan’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Tnx mahal!

    His wife, Ana, uses an expression meaning – “Thanks dear!”
    This would be the normal response to the poster’s comment, if you’re the wife.

    2- Nakakakilig naman!

    His college friend, Richard, uses an expression meaning – “It’s so romantic!”
    Use this expression if you think the anniversary is romantic.

    3- Congrats sa anibersaryo ninyo.

    His neighbor, Maria, uses an expression meaning – “Congratulations on your anniversary.”
    This is the traditional wedding anniversary congratulation.

    4- Alagaan mo nang mabuti si Ana kundi lagot ka sa akin!

    His wife’s high school friend, Bea, uses an expression meaning – “Take care of Ana or else you’ll have to answer to me!”
    Use this expression to be a bit threatening, but mostly in a humorous way.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • anibersaryo: “anniversary”
  • nakakakilig: “(romantic feeling)”
  • ninyo: “you, your”
  • tnx: “thanks”
  • kundi: “if not”
  • lagot: “to be in trouble”
  • ka: “you”
  • naman: “so”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Filipino! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Filipino

    How to Start Thinking in Filipino

    Learn 4 tools and techniques to stop translating in your head and start thinking in Filipino

    Going through Filipino lessons is enough to get by and learn the basics of Filipino, but to truly become fluent you need to be able to think in Filipino. This will allow you to have conversations with ease, read smoothly, and comprehensively understand natives. To do this, you need to go beyond just completing daily or weekly lessons.

    We naturally translate in our heads because it’s viewed as the easiest way to learn the definitions needed when learning a language. This way of learning can actually hinder your skills and fluency later on. If your brain has to make neural connections between the word you’re learning, what it means in your native tongue, and the physical object the connection will not be nearly as strong. When you bypass the original translation between Filipino and your native language then there is a more basic and strong connection between just the Filipino vocabulary word and the tangible object.

    start thinking in Filipino

    In this blog post, you will learn the 4 important techniques to easily and naturally begin to speculate about the daily occurrences in your life. The best part is all of these techniques are supported and can be achieved through FilipinoPod101.com.

    Create Your Free Lifetime Account and Start Learning the whole Filipino Language from the Beginning!

    1. Surround yourself with Filipino

    Surround Yourself

    By surrounding yourself with Filipino constantly you will completely immerse yourself in the language. Without realizing it you’ll be learning pronunciation, sentence structures, grammar, and new vocabulary. You can play music in the background while you’re cooking or have a Filipino radio station on while you study. Immersion is a key factor with this learning process because it is one of the easiest things to do, but very effective. Even if you are not giving the program your full attention you will be learning.

    One great feature of FilipinoPod101.com is the endless podcasts that are available to you. You can even download and listen to them on the go. These podcasts are interesting and are perfect for the intention of immersion, they are easy to listen to as background noise and are interesting enough to give your full attention. Many of them contain stories that you follow as you go through the lessons which push you to keep going.

    2. Learn through observation
    learn through observation

    Learning through observation is the most natural way to learn. Observation is how we all learned our native languages as infants and it’s a wonder why we stop learning this way. If you have patience and learn through observation then Filipino words will have their own meanings rather than meanings in reference to your native language. Ideally, you should skip the bilingual dictionary and just buy a dictionary in Filipino.

    FilipinoPod101.com also offers the materials to learn this way. We have numerous video lessons which present situational usage of each word or phrase instead of just a direct translation. This holds true for many of our videos and how we teach Filipino.

    3. Speak out loud to yourself
    talk to yourself

    Speaking to yourself in Filipino not only gets you in the mindset of Filipino, but also makes you listen to how you speak. It forces you to correct any errors with pronunciation and makes it easy to spot grammar mistakes. When you speak out loud talk about what you did that day and what you plan to do the next day. Your goal is to be the most comfortable speaking out loud and to easily create sentences. Once you feel comfortable talking to yourself start consciously thinking in your head about your daily activities and what is going on around you throughout the day.

    With FilipinoPod101.com you start speaking right away, not only this, but they have you repeat words and conversations after a native Filipino speaker. This makes your pronunciation very accurate! With this help, you are on the fast path to making clear and complex sentences and then actively thinking about your day.

    4. Practice daily

    If you don’t practice daily then your progress will be greatly slowed. Many people are tempted to take the 20-30 minutes they should be practicing a day and practice 120 in one day and skip the other days. This isn’t nearly as effective because everyday you practice you are reinforcing the skills and knowledge you have learned. If you practice all in one day you don’t retain the information because the brain can realistically only focus for 30 minutes at most. If you’re studying for 120 minutes on the same subject little of the information will be absorbed. Studying everyday allows you to review material that you went over previous days and absorb a small amount of information at a time.

    It’s tough to find motivation to study everyday, but FilipinoPod101.com can help. It’s easy to stay motivated with FilipinoPod101.com because we give you a set learning path, with this path we show how much progress you’ve made. This makes you stick to your goals and keep going!

    Conclusion

    Following the steps and having patience is the hardest part to achieving your goals, it’s not easy learning a new language. You are essentially teaching your brain to categorize the world in a completely new way. Stick with it and you can do it just remember the 4 tools I taught you today! With them, conversations, reading, and understanding will become much easier. The most important thing to remember is to use the tools that FilipinoPod101.com provides and you will be on your way to being fluent!

    Learn Filipino With FilipinoPod101 Today!