Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Gina: Hello and welcome to the Absolute Beginner series at FilipinoPod101.com. This is season 1, lesson 25, Making Comparisons in Filipino. I’m Gina.
Betsey: Kamusta! And I’m Betsey!
Gina: In this last lesson of the series, you'll learn how to compare people, places and things.
Betsey: This conversation takes place in the daytime.
Gina: It’s between two friends, Jane and Ren.
Betsey: The speakers know each other so they will be using informal speech.
Gina: Ok, let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
A: Ren, sino ang mas gusto mo? Si Nora o si Vilma?
B: Si Nora ang mas gusto ko.
A: Bakit si Nora?
B: Kasi, mas matalino si Nora kaysa kay Vilma.
A: Sige. May isa pa akong tanong.
B: Ano?
A: Anong mas gusto mo, kape o gatas?
B: Kape.
A: Bakit kape?
B: Kasi, mas mura ang kape kaysa gatas.
Gina: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
A: Ren, sino ang mas gusto mo? Si Nora o si Vilma?
B: Si Nora ang mas gusto ko.
A: Bakit si Nora?
B: Kasi, mas matalino si Nora kaysa kay Vilma.
A: Sige. May isa pa akong tanong.
B: Ano?
A: Anong mas gusto mo, kape o gatas?
B: Kape.
A: Bakit kape?
B: Kasi, mas mura ang kape kaysa gatas.
Gina: Now let's hear it with the English translation.
A: Ren, sino ang mas gusto mo? Si Nora o si Vilma?
A: Ren, who do you like more? Nora or Vilma?
B: Si Nora ang mas gusto ko.
B: I like Nora more.
A: Bakit si Nora?
A: Why Nora?
B: Kasi, mas matalino si Nora kaysa kay Vilma.
B: Because Nora is more intelligent than Vilma.
A: Sige. May isa pa akong tanong.
A: Okay. I have one more question.
B: Ano?
B: What?
A: Anong mas gusto mo, kape o gatas?
A: What do you like more, coffee or milk?
B: Kape.
B: Coffee.
A: Bakit kape?
A: Why coffee?
B: Kasi, mas mura ang kape kaysa gatas.
B: Because coffee is cheaper than milk.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Gina: I must admit, this dialogue was a little confusing Betsey.
Betsey: Oh really? Why?
Gina: For starters, who are Nora and Vilma?
Betsey: (laughs) Nora Aunor and Vilma Santos were the most popular actresses of their time in the Philippines.
Gina: When were they popular?
Betsey: They were really popular in the 1970s and 1980s, which was considered the golden age of Philippine cinema. But actually, even if they aren’t as active in the industry as they used to be, everyone still knows who they are.
Gina: I see. So, how do you describe their fans then?
Betsey: The fans were very aggressive during that time, and Nora and Vilma were often compared by their fans, like a contest on who is better.
Gina: For example?
Betsey: They say things like “Mas magaling kumanta si Nora kaysa kay Vilma”
Gina: Which means “Nora sings better than Vilma”, right?
Betsey: Yes you’re right.
Gina: Oh, I see now. Is it common for Filipinos to compare celebrities and things this way?
Betsey: Well, frankly, yes. Filipinos are very fond of comparing people, places and things.
Gina: In what kinds of conversations do they compare things or people usually?
Betsey: Usually, the comparisons are the topic of jokes.
Gina: But why do they love to compare?
Betsey: The answer is simple. Filipinos also love to show their best and at times it becomes like a competition. Yeah, Filipinos can get quite competitive.
Gina: Wow I didn’t know that!
Betsey: In addition, showdowns are also very popular, especially in singing and dancing.
Gina: That’s very interesting! I had no idea! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Gina: The first word we shall see is...
Betsey: gusto [natural native speed]
Gina: to like, to want
Betsey: gusto [slowly - broken down by syllable] gusto [natural native speed]
Gina: Next
Betsey: mas [natural native speed]
Gina: more
Betsey: mas [slowly - broken down by syllable] mas [natural native speed]
Gina: Next
Betsey: bakit [natural native speed]
Gina: why
Betsey: bakit [slowly - broken down by syllable] bakit [natural native speed]
Gina: Next
Betsey: matalino [natural native speed]
Gina: intelligent, smart
Betsey: matalino [slowly - broken down by syllable] matalino [natural native speed]
Gina: Next
Betsey: kape [natural native speed]
Gina: coffee
Betsey: kape [slowly - broken down by syllable] kape [natural native speed]
Gina: Next
Betsey: gatas [natural native speed]
Gina: milk
Betsey: gatas [slowly - broken down by syllable] gatas [natural native speed]
Gina: Next
Betsey: mura [natural native speed]
Gina: cheap, inexpensive
Betsey: mura [slowly - broken down by syllable] mura [natural native speed]
Gina: Next
Betsey: sino [natural native speed]
Gina: who
Betsey: sino [slowly - broken down by syllable] sino [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Gina: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Betsey: We’re going to study the three words “sino”, “mas” and “matalino”.
Gina: Great! What do we study first?
Betsey: First is “sino”, which is a pronoun that means “who”.
Gina: Can it refer to males and females?
Betsey: Yes, it can refer to both genders.
Gina: Can it be used to refer to singular or plural subjects?
Betsey: Yes, it can be used for both.
Gina: Finally, can it also be used in the formal and informal conversations?
Betsey: It can.
Gina: Ok, now let’s give an example.
Betsey: Sure.
Gina: Let’s say “Who are you?”
Betsey: That will be “Sino ka?”
Gina: Nice! How about the next word?
Betsey: That would be “mas”
Gina: That’s “more” in English.
Betsey: That’s right. “Mas” is usually used to compare people, places or things.
Gina: Can it be used both in formal and informal conversations?
Betsey: Yes it can. Also, “mas” is always followed by a verb or an adjective.
Gina: For example?
Betsey: “Mas magaling”, where “magaling” means “good”.
Gina: That would be “better”, right?
Betsey: Yup you got it!
Gina: Awesome! What’s next?
Betsey: We have the word “matalino”
Gina: This is an adjective used to describe people who are intelligent or smart.
Betsey: That’s right.
Gina: Can it be used to describe singular or plural subjects, as well as both male and female?
Betsey: Yes. In addition, it can also be used in both formal and informal situations.
Gina: Ok, let’s give our listeners an example.
Betsey: Sure.
Gina: Let’s try “Are you smart?”
Betsey: That will be “Matalino ka ba?”
Gina: Great. Okay, now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Gina: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to compare people, places and things.
Betsey: When comparing people, places and things in Filipino, we use the word “mas” which means “more”.
Gina: Okay, what pattern should we follow to compare two things or places, say A and B?
Betsey: We use the pattern “Mas + adjective + ang + A + kaysa + B . Once more - “Mas + adjective + ang + A + kaysa + B
Gina: This is “A is more + adjective than B”?
Betsey: Exactly.
Gina: Let’s take a look at the words used in this pattern.
Betsey: Sure. First, “kaysa” is the comparing word “than”.
Gina: I see. For example, we can say that A is larger than B with….
Betsey: “Mas malaki ang A kaysa B” where “malaki” is the adjective for “large” or “big”.
Gina: That’s how we compare objects and places right?
Betsey: Yes.
Gina: How about comparing people? Do we use the same pattern?
Betsey: Comparing people requires the additional word “kay” after the comparing word “kaysa”.
Gina: Is that all we need to add?
Betsey: Well no, we also need to change the article “ang” to “si” to indicate that the subject refers to people.
Gina: Combining all those together, the pattern we should use when comparing two people is….
Betsey: “Mas + adjective + si person A + kaysa + kay person B. Again “Mas + adjective + si person A + kaysa + kay person B.
Gina: Let’s give an example.
Betsey: Okay. What do you have in mind?
Gina: Hmmm let’s see. Okay got it!
Betsey: What is it?
Gina: For example, if we want to say “Philip is more intelligent than Paolo.”
Betsey: We say “Mas matalino si Philip kaysa kay Paolo”, where “matalino” is the adjective for “intelligent/smart”.
Gina: Now let’s try to compare apples and grapes. How about “Apples are more delicious than grapes”?
Betsey: That will be “Mas masarap ang mansanas kaysa ubas” where “masarap” means
Gina: ...delicious!
Betsey: Yes and “mansanas and ubas” is...
Gina: “apples and grapes” respectively.
Betsey: Precisely.
Gina: Great! So how can we talk about a greater degree of the adjectives in Filipino.
Betsey: Well, that’s actually really easy.
Gina: Really? How easy?
Betsey: We just add the word “mas” to the adjective to indicate a greater degree.
Gina: Wow! Let’s try some examples!
Betsey: Okay. Firstly, “beautiful” in Filipino is “maganda”.
Gina: So “more beautiful” in Filipino will be…
Betsey: “mas maganda”.
Gina: I see now. How about another one?
Betsey: Hot in Filipino is “mainit”.
Gina: So how do we say “hotter” in Filipino?
Betsey: All you do is add “mas”, so it becomes “mas mainit”.
Gina: Well, that really was easy, Betsey!
Betsey: (laughs) I told you it would be!

Outro

Gina: Okay, that’s it for this lesson, and for this series. We hope you enjoyed it and found it useful!
Betsey: Thank you for listening, everyone. We hope to see you soon in another series.
Gina: Bye everyone!
Betsey: Paalam!

3 Comments

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FilipinoPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hello Listeners! Anong mas gusto mo, kape o gatas?

FilipinoPod101.com Verified
Monday at 04:11 PM
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Hi Lance,


You can use "kaysa + sa" OR "kaysa" when comparing something or someone with a common noun/pronoun. The difference is when you drop the "sa" the comparison is more general.


Mas mabilis si Ana tumakbo kaysa sa akin.

Mas matangkad si Anton kaysa sa puno.

Mas mahaba ang libro kaysa sa pelikula.


Mas matamis ang mangga kaysa melon.

Mas mataas ang gusali kaysa bahay.


Salamat!


Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

Lance
Saturday at 04:47 PM
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Kumusta po kayo. Kailan po ginagamit ang 'kaysa sa' vs 'kaysa'?


Salamat.