Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Gina: Hello and welcome to the Absolute Beginner series at FilipinoPod101.com. This is season 1, lesson 24, Something Borrowed in the Philippines. I’m Gina.
Betsey: Kamusta! And I’m Betsey!
Gina: In this lesson, you'll learn how to borrow things.
Betsey: This conversation takes place at school.
Gina: It’s between two friends, Jane and Cindy.
Betsey: The speakers know each other, so they’ll be using informal Filipino.
Gina: Ok, let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
A: Nakalimutan ko ang lapis ko!
B: Meron akong isa pang lapis Jane.
A: Talaga? Cindy, pwede ko bang mahiram ang lapis mo?
B: Sige. Pakibalik pagkatapos.
A: Sige. Maraming salamat!
B: Wala yun. Jane, nakalimutan ko ang bolpen ko pahiram ng sa'yo, sandali lang.
A: Walang problema. Heto Cindy.
B: Salamat!
A: Walang anuman.
Gina: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
A: Nakalimutan ko ang lapis ko!
B: Meron akong isa pang lapis Jane.
A: Talaga? Cindy, pwede ko bang mahiram ang lapis mo?
B: Sige. Pakibalik pagkatapos.
A: Sige. Maraming salamat!
B: Wala yun. Jane, nakalimutan ko ang bolpen ko pahiram ng sa'yo, sandali lang.
A: Walang problema. Heto Cindy.
B: Salamat!
A: Walang anuman.
Gina: Now let's hear it with the English translation.
A: Nakalimutan ko ang lapis ko!
A: I forgot my pencil!
B: Meron akong isa pang lapis Jane.
B: I have another pencil, Jane.
A: Talaga? Cindy, pwede ko bang mahiram ang lapis mo?
A: Really? Cindy, can I borrow your pencil?
B: Sige. Pakibalik pagkatapos.
B: Sure. Please return it afterwards.
A: Sige. Maraming salamat!
A: Okay. Thank you very much!
B: Wala yun. Jane, nakalimutan ko ang bolpen ko pahiram ng sa'yo, sandali lang.
B: It's nothing. Jane, I forgot my ballpoint pen. Can I borrow yours for a while?
A: Walang problema. Heto Cindy.
A: No problem. Here, Cindy.
B: Salamat!
B: Thanks!
A: Walang anuman.
A: You're welcome.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Gina: Alright! For this lesson can we talk about the writing materials used by Filipino students at school?
Betsey: Sure, why not?
Gina: Great! What’s interesting about it, Betsey?
Betsey: I have to say that there is a big difference between the writing materials that students use at school, depending on their educational level in the Philippines.
Gina: Really? Like what?
Betsey: For instance, pencils are only used by students from the kindergarten level to the 2nd or 3rd grade in the elementary level.
Gina: Is that so? How about for the upper levels?
Betsey: Upper levels such as high school students and university students seldom use pencils. In fact, almost 80% of them do not have pencils with them at all!
Gina: Well that’s something alright! Are there any exceptions?
Betsey: Of course there is an exception when the teacher requires them to have pencils for activity or drawing purposes.
Gina: Why is there a restriction on writing materials at these upper levels?
Betsey: Well, it’s due to precautions set by teachers especially during exams, since lead can be easily erased.
Gina: Ah I see, so it’s used to control cheating among the students.
Betsey: Yes exactly. Plus, for the 3rd graders, it’s a big deal for them when they get to transition from using pencils to pens. It’s a penmanship thing, where when a student writes well enough, the teacher allows him or her to use a pen.
Gina: Wow, that’s interesting! This may sound a bit silly, but what would you say is the most popular type of pencil in the Philippines?
Betsey: That would be the Mongol pencil #2.
Gina: Wow! Thanks Betsey!
Betsey: You’re always welcome Gina!
Gina: Well, let’s move on to the vocab!
VOCAB LIST
Gina: The first word we shall see is...
Betsey: kalimutan [natural native speed]
Gina: to forget
Betsey: kalimutan [slowly - broken down by syllable] kalimutan [natural native speed]
Gina: Next
Betsey: pwede [natural native speed]
Gina: to be able to, can, is it possible to (questions &statements)
Betsey: pwede [slowly - broken down by syllable] pwede [natural native speed]
Gina: Next
Betsey: hiramin [natural native speed]
Gina: to borrow
Betsey: hiramin [slowly - broken down by syllable] hiramin [natural native speed]
Gina: Next
Betsey: lapis [natural native speed]
Gina: pencil
Betsey: lapis [slowly - broken down by syllable] lapis [natural native speed]
Gina: Next
Betsey: balik [natural native speed]
Gina: to return
Betsey: balik [slowly - broken down by syllable] balik [natural native speed]
Gina: Next
Betsey: bolpen [natural native speed]
Gina: ball pen
Betsey: bolpen [slowly - broken down by syllable] bolpen [natural native speed]
Gina: Next
Betsey: pagkatapos [natural native speed]
Gina: finally; thereafter; after
Betsey: pagkatapos [slowly - broken down by syllable] pagkatapos [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Gina: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases in this lesson. So what’s our first word Betsey?
Betsey: We have the word “kalimutan”.
Gina: Isn’t that the verb which means “to forget”?
Betsey: Yes it is.
Gina: Will you give our listeners an example for that? How do we say “Do not forget me”?
Betsey: Hmmm, that will be “Huwag mo akong kalimutan.”
Gina: I see. So the Filipino word for “do not” is..
Betsey: “Huwag”. The second word we have for our listeners is “ibalik”.
Gina: That’s the verb that means “to return” something.
Betsey: Yes, that’s right.
Gina: Let’s give an example, shall we?
Betsey: That would be best!
Gina: Okay, so how do we say “Return this to him” in Filipino?
Betsey: That’s “Ibalik mo ito sa kanya”
Gina: Can we give another one?
Betsey: Sure!
Gina: Alright! This time, translate “Return this tomorrow” to Filipino.
Betsey: That would be “Ibalik mo ito bukas”, where “bukas”...
Gina: ...is the Filipino word for “tomorrow”.
Betsey: That’s right!
Gina: Okay, now let’s move onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Gina: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to borrow things in Filipino.
Betsey: Great! Let’s get started.
Gina: Okay! What’s the pattern we should use Betsey?
Betsey: We use the pattern “pwede ko bang mahiram ang + object?” This means “May I borrow + object”. Once more “pwede ko bang mahiram ang + object?”
Gina: When is this pattern usually used?
Betsey: We use this pattern if we want to state specifically which object we are borrowing.
Gina: I see. What if the speaker and the person they’re talking to are fully aware of what object the speaker is borrowing?
Betsey: In that case, they can choose to use the second pattern “pahiram ng sa’yo” or “Can I borrow yours?”
Gina: Okay!
Betsey: But take note that the second pattern “pahiram ng sa’yo” is not limited.
Gina: What do you mean by that Betsey?
Betsey: It can also be used in the same manner as the first pattern.
Gina: How do we do that?
Betsey: We just modify it to “pahiram ng + object” and it can be used the same as the first pattern.
Gina: Is there any difference between the two when you use them to borrow something specific?
Betsey: Yes, there is. The degree of formality between the two is different.
Gina: So which is formal and informal between the two patterns?
Betsey: The first pattern “pwede ko bang mahiram ang + object?” is more formal than the second pattern “pahiram ng + object”.
Gina: What’s the reason behind this?
Betsey: It’s because the second pattern, “pahiram ng + object?” has a commanding tone.
Gina: I see. How about the first pattern?
Betsey: The first pattern has a “requesting tone.”
Gina: I think I’ve got it.
Betsey: Great! Next, if we want to tell someone to borrow something, we use the phrase “hiramin mo ang + object”
Gina: Is that “borrow” + object”?
Betsey: Yes it is!
Gina: Is it formal?
Betsey: To make it formal, we just add “po” to make it “hiramin niyo po ang + object”.
Gina: Nice! That wasn’t so hard.
Betsey: Let’s give our listeners some examples.
Gina: Good idea!
Betsey: Let’s use the pattern “pwede ko bang mahiram ang + object?” first.
Gina: Okay! So how do we say “Can I borrow your pencil?”
Betsey: Using the first pattern we have “Pwede ko bang mahiram ang lapis mo?”
Gina: I bet “lapis” means “pencil”, right?
Betsey: Yup you got it!
Gina: Alright! This time let’s use the other pattern.
Betsey: Which is “pahiram ng + object?”
Gina: Let’s try…"Can I borrow the newspaper?”
Betsey: Using the second pattern we have “Pahiram ako ng dyaryo?” where the word “dyaryo” means
Gina: ...I’m guessing it means “newspaper”, right?
Betsey: That’s right.
Gina: Listeners, don’t forget to check the lesson notes where you can find more examples on this grammar point.

Outro

Gina: Okay, that’s it for this lesson.
Betsey: Thank you for listening, everyone.
Gina: See you next time!
Betsey: Paalam.

3 Comments

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FilipinoPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hello Listeners! Can you say "Can I borrow your pen?" in Filipino? Let's practice here.

FilipinoPod101.com
Tuesday at 04:44 AM
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Hi Drew!


Tama ang iyong sagot! Thank you for your comment. If you ever have any questions, feel free to leave us a comment!


Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

Drew
Saturday at 08:50 PM
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Pwede ko bang mahiram ang ballpen mo?