Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Ice: Hi everyone, and welcome back to FilipinoPod101.com.
Brandon: This is Lower Beginner, season 1, lesson 6, What Does this Filipino Word Mean? I’m Brandon.
Ice: Hello. And I’m Ice. In this lesson, you’ll learn how to ask people for the translation of words from English to Filipino.
Brandon: I think this will be really handy for our listeners.
Ice: Yes, so let’s not keep them waiting any longer!
Brandon: All right! The conversation takes place at a school, in the daytime, and is between two friends.
Ice: The speakers are close friends, so they'll be using informal Filipino.
Brandon: All right! Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Paola: Julia, ano sa Filipino ang book?
Julia: Libro.
Paola: Ano naman sa Filipino ang money?
Julia: Pera.
Paola: At ano sa Filipino ang banana?
Julia: Saging
Paola: Panghuli, ano sa Filipino ang street?
Julia: Kalye.
Paola: Salamat!
Julia: Walang anuman.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Paola: Julia, ano sa Filipino ang book?
Julia: Libro.
Paola: Ano naman sa Filipino ang money?
Julia: Pera.
Paola: At ano sa Filipino ang banana?
Julia: Saging
Paola: Panghuli, ano sa Filipino ang street?
Julia: Kalye.
Paola: Salamat!
Julia: Walang anuman.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Paola: Julia, ano sa Filipino ang book?
Brandon: Julia, what is "book" in Filipino?
Julia: Libro.
Brandon: Libro.
Paola: Ano naman sa Filipino ang money?
Brandon: So, what is "money" in Filipino?
Julia: Pera.
Brandon: Pera.
Paola: At ano sa Filipino ang banana?
Brandon: And what is "banana" in Filipino?
Julia: Saging
Brandon: Saging.
Paola: Panghuli, ano sa Filipino ang street?
Brandon: Lastly, what is "street" in Filipino?
Julia: Kalye.
Brandon: Kalye.
Paola: Salamat!
Brandon: Thanks!
Julia: Walang anuman.
Brandon: You’re welcome.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Brandon: The Philippines has two official languages, right?
Ice: That’s right. Filipino and English are the two official languages of the country.
Brandon: However, Filipinos use a mix of the two languages in daily life.
Ice: So, in daily conversation, Filipinos—especially the younger generation—mix English words into Filipino statements.
Brandon: So the grammar is in Filipino but some words are in English?
Ice: Yes, and they call it "Taglish".
Brandon: The combination of Tagalog and English.
Ice: Yes that’s right. The younger generation used the word “Tagalog” instead of “Filipino” in coining the informal word “Taglish”, because Tagalog is the local dialect that had the most influence in the Filipino language, and they thought it sounded better.
Brandon: Does that mean Tagalog is not the same as Filipino?
Ice: Yes. Tagalog is a local dialect in the Philippines, but it is the most similar to the national language, Filipino.
Brandon: I see.
Ice: Also, “Taglish” is a very informal word and it’s only used by the younger generation.
Brandon: I guess almost all countries are experiencing the same with their younger generations.
Ice: Yeah, I guess so.
Brandon: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Brandon: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Ice: ano [natural native speed]
Brandon: what
Ice: ano [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: ano [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: sa [natural native speed]
Brandon: in, to
Ice: sa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: sa [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: Filipino [natural native speed]
Brandon: Filipino
Ice: Filipino [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: Filipino [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: ang [natural native speed]
Brandon: the
Ice: ang [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: ang [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: libro [natural native speed]
Brandon: book
Ice: libro [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: libro [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: saging [natural native speed]
Brandon: banana
Ice: saging [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: saging [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: pera [natural native speed]
Brandon: money
Ice: pera [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: pera [natural native speed]
: And last:
Ice: kalye [natural native speed]
Brandon: street
Ice: kalye [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: kalye [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Brandon: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Ice: The first word is sa. This is a very flexible word in the Filipino language.
Brandon: Moreover, it's the Filipino word that’s used as a preposition for adverbs of place.
Ice: Sa is often translated as "in", "at", "on", and the like.
Brandon: It also expresses possession.
Ice: That’s right. And, it's also used in both formal and informal Filipino.
Brandon: Ok, it sounds pretty complicated, so let’s give our listeners a couple of examples.
Ice: Sure. We can say Kakain ako sa kusina.
Brandon: That's informal for "I'll eat in the kitchen." Let’s give another one.
Ice: Okay. Tumira ako sa Japan.
Brandon: That's "I lived in Japan." Ok, I think we can go to the next word now.
Ice: The second word that we’re going to talk about is ang.
Brandon: It’s an article that's used to introduce nouns in statements and questions.
Ice: The word ang is often translated as "the" in English.
Brandon: Let’s have an example.
Ice: All right, Ang pusa ay masaya.
Brandon "The cat is happy."
Ice: That’s right!
Brandon: I think we can move on to the final word, now.
Ice: The last word is Filipino, which is the official and native language of the Philippines.
Brandon: In addition, the word Filipino can also be used to refer to the people of the Philippines, when speaking english. But In filipino it becomes Pilipino.
Ice: That’s right, for example Ako ay isang Pilipino.
Brandon: That’s "I am a Filipino." Let’s give another one.
Ice: Okay. Nag-aaral ako ng Filipino.
Brandon: That's "I'm studying Filipino." Do you hear the difference listeners? All right, I hope everyone followed that. Now let’s move on to the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Brandon: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to ask for the translation of an English word in Filipino. For that we use the phrase or sentence pattern…
Ice: Ano sa Filipino ang + the English word that you want to translate.
Brandon: Which means "What's the Filipino word for (english word)?"
Ice: Yes, that’s right.
Brandon: Let’s give an example. For instance, I want to ask how to say the Filipino word for "the sky".
Ice: That's Ano sa Filipino ang “sky”?
Brandon: Can you repeat that?
Ice: Ano sa Filipino ang sky?
Brandon: Great! How about if I want to ask how to say the Filipino word for "the ocean"?
Ice: Using the sentence pattern, we have Ano sa Filipino ang “ocean”?.
Brandon: Again?
Ice: Ano sa Filipino ang ocean?
Brandon: What if we we want to ask for the english equivalent of a Filipino word?
Ice: If we want to ask the reverse, we would use a different sentence pattern. First you can say“Ano sa English ang, then the Filipino word.
Brandon: That's "What's the English word for [something]” right?
Ice: That’s right
Brandon: So how would I say, ‘What is the English word for mata?’
Ice: That's Ano sa English ang mata?
Brandon: Again?
Ice: Ano sa English ang mata?
Brandon: By the way, mata means “eye”. All right! How do we say, "What's the English word for saging?"
Ice: That's Ano sa English ang saging?
Brandon: Again?
Ice: Ano sa English ang saging?
Brandon: saging is the FIlipino word for Bananas.
MARKETING PIECE
Brandon: Listeners, ever have any Filipino language or lesson-related questions?
Ice: Or maybe you have some feedback for us...
Brandon: Leave us a comment or ask a question on the lessons page!
Ice: It's super simple. Go to FilipinoPod101.com...
Brandon: ...click on comments,
Ice: ...enter your comment and name,
Brandon: ...and that's it!
Ice: Commenting is a a great way to practice writing and reading in Filipino.
Brandon: It helps you learn faster.
Ice: And it helps us get better through your feedback.
Brandon: No excuses.
Ice: Go to FilipinoPod101.com, and comment now.
Brandon: NOW!

Outro

Brandon: Well, that’s all for this lesson.
Ice: Yes, but please check out the lesson notes for further discussion and more examples.
Brandon: Yes, and we hope you’ll join us in the next lesson! Thanks for listening, bye everyone!
Ice: Paalam!

5 Comments

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FilipinoPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hello Listeners! Ano sa Filipino ang "study"?

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Team FilipinoPod101.com
Monday at 8:44 pm
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Hi Jason!


Tagalog and Filipino are essentially the same language. Filipino is the term we call our national language which is composed of the standardized version or the version of Tagalog that is used in the capital.


The difference is that Tagalog has many subtle variations in the different Tagalog regions in the country. But essentially, Filipino is the standardized form of Tagalog.


Hope this helps!


Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

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Jason
Friday at 11:44 am
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so, "Filipino" and "Tagalog" are not the same language? in other lessons, "Tagalog" has been translated as "Filipino". What did I miss? :-/ :-?? O.o

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FilipinoPod101.com
Monday at 6:31 pm
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Hi Jason!


Good question! The question you gave "paano sabihin sa Filipino ang (English word)” means "How do you say (English word) in Filipino." On the other hand, asking "ano sa Filipino ang (English word)” means "what in Filipino is (English word)." They're actually both conversational or informal. You could make them formal/polite simply by adding "po" within the sentence.


For example,

"Paano po sabihin sa Filipino ang...?"

And

"Ano po sa Filipino ang...?"


Salamat! If you have any questions, feel free to ask! :)


Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

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Jason
Friday at 4:20 am
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I've heard the phrase "paano sa sabihian sa Filipino ang....(English word)". Is this a more formal version? What's the difference between this and "ano sa Filipino"?


Salamat!


Jason