Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Matt: Hello Listeners! Welcome back to FilipinoPod101.com. This is Lower Beginner, season 1, lesson 19, Using Your Filipino Language Skills To Make Plans. I’m Matt.
Ice: Hello. And I’m Ice.
Matt: In this lesson, you’ll learn about time ordinals. Time ordinals are important in the filipino language, because they will tell you what tense the verb needs to be in.
Ice: The conversation takes place at a school during the day and is between Anna and Ella.
Matt: The speakers are friends, so they’ll be using casual Filipino. Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Anna: Ella, anong ginawa mo kahapon?
Ella: Nag-aral ako sa silid-aklatan kahapon.
Anna: Anong gagawin mo ngayon?
Ella: Sasagutan ko ang takdang aralin natin ngayon.
Anna: May gagawin ka ba bukas?
Ella: Wala akong gagawin bukas. Bakit?
Anna: Gusto mo bang kumain sa labas bukas?
Ella: Oo sige, magkita tayo bukas.
Anna: Sige, salamat!
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Anna: Ella, anong ginawa mo kahapon?
Ella: Nag-aral ako sa silid-aklatan kahapon.
Anna: Anong gagawin mo ngayon?
Ella: Sasagutan ko ang takdang aralin natin ngayon.
Anna: May gagawin ka ba bukas?
Ella: Wala akong gagawin bukas. Bakit?
Anna: Gusto mo bang kumain sa labas bukas?
Ella: Oo sige, magkita tayo bukas.
Anna: Sige, salamat!
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Anna: Ella, anong ginawa mo kahapon?
Matt: Ella, what did you do yesterday?
Ella: Nag-aral ako sa silid-aklatan kahapon.
Matt: I studied at the library.
Anna: Anong gagawin mo ngayon?
Matt: What will you do today?
Ella: Sasagutan ko ang takdang aralin natin ngayon.
Matt: I'll do our homework.
Anna: May gagawin ka ba bukas?
Matt: Do you have something to do tomorrow?
Ella: Wala akong gagawin bukas. Bakit?
Matt: No, I don’t have anything to do tomorrow. Why?
Anna: Gusto mo bang kumain sa labas bukas?
Matt: Do you want to eat out tomorrow?
Ella: Oo sige, magkita tayo bukas.
Matt: Yes sure, let’s meet tomorrow.
Anna: Sige, salamat!
Matt: Sure, thank you!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Ice: Matt, let’s talk about setting dates in the Philippines.
Matt: How would you usually make plans in the Philippines?
Ice: Well, it’s pretty much the same as most other countries. Typically you’d start the conversation by asking the person about their schedule and if they have free time. If they do, you immediately ask the person if they would like to do something together with you during their free time.
Matt: Hmm, that’s a good tactic, especially for making plans to meet someone for dating. That way the other person can’t make any excuses about being busy!
Ice: (laughs) I guess that’s the idea. Most people on dates spend their time eating at restaurants, walking around parks or malls, and watching movies and performances.
Matt: Oh that sounds like a lot of fun. Ok let’s move onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Matt: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word we shall see is:
Ice: gawin [natural native speed]
Matt: to do
Ice: gawin [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: gawin [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: kahapon [natural native speed]
Matt: yesterday
Ice: kahapon [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: kahapon [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: mag-aral [natural native speed]
Matt: to study
Ice: mag-aral [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: mag-aral [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: silid-aklatan [natural native speed]
Matt: library
Ice: silid-aklatan [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: silid-aklatan [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: ngayon [natural native speed]
Matt: now, today
Ice: ngayon [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: ngayon [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: sagutan [natural native speed]
Matt: to answer
Ice: sagutan [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: sagutan [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: takdang aralin [natural native speed]
Matt: homework, assignment
Ice: takdang aralin [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: takdang aralin [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: bukas [natural native speed]
Matt: tomorrow
Ice: bukas [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: bukas [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: bakit [natural native speed]
Matt: why
Ice: bakit [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: bakit [natural native speed]
: And Last:
Ice: magkita [natural native speed]
Matt: to meet
Ice: magkita [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: magkita [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Matt: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. We’ll be looking at a few time ordinals.
Ice: The first word is “kahapon.”
Matt: This is an adverb that means "yesterday."
Ice: “Kahapon” expresses time in the recent past. For instance, we can say “Nandito siya kahapon”
Matt: “He was here yesterday.”
Ice: We can also use it as a noun when we say “Martes kahapon”.
Matt: Which is similar to “Yesterday was Tuesday.”
Ice: Next is “ngayon”
Matt: This is also an adverb. It describes the present time or moment.
Ice: And “ngayon” can also refer to the date today.
Matt: So essentially, we can use it to mean “now” or “today.”
Ice: Exactly. For example, “Nasaan ka ngayon?”
Matt: That's the question, “Where are you now?”
Ice: You can also use it in the sentence “Darating siya ngayon.”
Matt: Which means “She'll arrive today.”
Ice: The final time ordinal that we're going to talk about is “bukas.”
Matt: This is an adverb that means "tomorrow."
Ice: It can also be a noun, which means the day after today.
Matt: Let’s give an example of its usage.
Ice: “Nandito ka ba bukas?”
Matt: Which means “Are you going to be here tomorrow?”
Ice: In that example, we used “bukas” as an adverb.
Matt: How about using it as a noun?
Ice: “Bukas ay Linggo.”
Matt: “Tomorrow is Sunday”
Ice: Exactly.
Matt: Great, now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Matt: In this lesson, you’ll learn about the time ordinals and how they affect the tenses of verbs.
Ice: From the key vocabulary, we learned the three basic time ordinals “kahapon,” “ngayon,” and “bukas,” which mean “yesterday,” “today,” and “tomorrow” respectively. First, we will look at “kahapon,
Matt: This word indicates actions that are done in the past. When used in a sentence it tends to follow this pattern.
Ice: First, we say kahapon. We then follow that with our pronoun/noun. Then, we end with the verb in past tense. However, this pattern can also be switched, so that we start with the verb in past tense, follow that with the pronoun or noun, and end with kahapon.
Matt: So if we switch the order would that affect the meaning at all?
Ice: No, it wouldn’t. For example, we can say “Kahapon ako pumunta” or “Pumunta ako kahapon,” and the meaning would still be the same.
Matt: That is, “I came yesterday.”
Ice: Now let’s talk about the second time ordinal, which is “ngayon.”
Matt: This time ordinal is used to indicate actions that are being done at the present time.
Ice: Yes, and the pattern for using it is the same as that we just introduced, except that the verb is in the present tense instead of the past tense. Also like the first pattern, we can freely switch the order of the time expression and the verb.
Matt: So the idea “I'm eating right now,” can be expressed in two ways then?
Ice: Yes, and those are “Ngayon ako kumakain” or “Kumakain ako ngayon.”
Matt: Great!
Ice: However, for the time ordinal “ngayon,” when it's used to express the time “today” instead of “now,” the verb should be in the future tense.
Matt: For instance?
Ice: For instance let’s say “Ngayon ako pupunta.” Here the verb “pupunta” is in the future tense, because what we mean is “I'll come today” and not “I'm coming now.”
Matt: So we have to take note of whether we're using it to mean the time right now, or to express the word “today.”
Ice: Yes, that’s right. Moving on, the last ordinal that we’ll talk about is “bukas.”
Matt: This is used to indicate actions in the future, and the pattern we use is like this.
Ice: First we say bukas, followed by the subject and end with the verb in the future tense. Like before, we can exchange bukas and the verb. Bukas ako pupunta or pupunta ako Bukas.
Matt: Those both mean, “I will come tomorrow.” If you're having any problems with this lesson, you can always read the lesson notes for more examples and detailed discussion, or leave us a comment.

Outro

Matt: And that’s all for this lesson. Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time. Bye!
Ice: Paalam!

3 Comments

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FilipinoPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hi Listeners! Let's practice making plans in Filipino here! 

Team FilipinoPod101.com
Sunday at 3:54 pm
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Hello Ronny!


The hyphen (-) is used when the word that comes after nag starts with a vowel or a consonant. If it starts with a vowel like aral, the hyphen will be used. If it starts with a consonant, no need to use a hyphen.


Salamat!


Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

ronny
Saturday at 12:30 am
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Hello.

May i ask way some "nag" words is written with the - betwin the word like

nag-aral, then some words is without like naglalaro. Is it a reason for that?

Salamat po.