Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Brandon: Hi Listeners! Welcome back to FilipinoPod101.com. This is Lower Beginner, season 1, lesson 18, Describing Your Daily Routine in Filipino. I’m Brandon.
Ice: Hello. And I’m Ice.
Brandon: In this lesson, you’ll learn about the “nag” form of verbs and use them to describe actions.
Ice: Describing actions is important in daily conversations.
Brandon: Exactly! The conversation in this lesson takes place at home, it’s from the point of view of a daughter describing her mother’s daily routine to someone else.
Ice: There is only one speaker, and she'll be using casual Filipino.
Brandon: All right! Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Ariel: Araw-araw maraming gawaing-bahay si Inay
: Nagluluto siya ng almusal.
: Naglalaba siya ng damit.
: Naglilinis siya ng bahay.
: At naghuhugas siya ng pinggan.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Ariel: Araw-araw maraming gawaing-bahay si Inay
: Nagluluto siya ng almusal.
: Naglalaba siya ng damit.
: Naglilinis siya ng bahay.
: At naghuhugas siya ng pinggan.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Ariel: Araw-araw maraming gawaing-bahay si Inay
Brandon: Every day, my mother has a lot of chores.
: Nagluluto siya ng almusal.
Brandon: She cooks breakfast.
: Naglalaba siya ng damit.
Brandon: She washes the clothes.
: Naglilinis siya ng bahay.
Brandon: She cleans the house.
: At naghuhugas siya ng pinggan.
Brandon: And she washes the dishes.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Ice: Let’s talk a little about the traditional Filipino family.
Brandon: Is it true that traditional Filipino mothers were the ones responsible for doing all the chores at home.
Ice: Yes, it’s true. Traditionally a lot of mothers in the Philippines were full-time housewives. However, in modern times it has changed.
Brandon: How so?
Ice: Well, Filipino women have become more career-oriented, and it is very popular for people to have careers abroad in the Philippines. Because of this there's a growing number of house husbands in the country.
Brandon: I see, so a lot of people work abroad, doesn’t this affect the family?
Ice: No – even in this new situation, most families are still intact and strong.
Brandon: That’s good to hear. So now let’s move on to the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Brandon: Lets take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is:
Ice: araw-araw [natural native speed]
Brandon: everyday, daily
Ice: araw-araw [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: araw-araw [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: marami [natural native speed]
Brandon: many, plenty, a lot, much
Ice: marami [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: marami [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: gawaing-bahay [natural native speed]
Brandon: chores (at home)
Ice: gawaing-bahay [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: gawaing-bahay [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: almusal [natural native speed]
Brandon: breakfast
Ice: almusal [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: almusal [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: Mag-luto [natural native speed]
Brandon: to cook
Ice: Mag-luto [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: Mag-luto [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: mag-laba [natural native speed]
Brandon: to do the laundry
Ice: mag-laba [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: mag-laba [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: mag-linis [natural native speed]
Brandon: to clean
Ice: mag-linis [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: mag-linis [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: damit [natural native speed]
Brandon: clothes
Ice: damit [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: damit [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: mag-hugas [natural native speed]
Brandon: to wash
Ice: mag-hugas [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: mag-hugas [natural native speed]
: And Last:
Ice: pinggan [natural native speed]
Brandon: plate
Ice: pinggan [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: pinggan [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Brandon: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Ice: First up is the noun “damit”.
Brandon: This means “clothes”. Can we give an example? How would you say “Buy some clothes”?
Ice: That would be Bumili ka ng damit.
Brandon: Okay, let’s move on to the second word.
Ice: Next up is “pinggan”.
Brandon: Which means “plate”. How would you say “Wash the plates?”
Ice: Using the key word “pinggan,” we'll get “Hugasan mo ang mga pinggan”.
Brandon: In the English example sentence we used the plural form of “plates”. Is it the same in Filipino?
Ice: Adding the word “mga” before nouns creates the plural form of nouns in Filipino. So the plural form of “pinggan” is “mga pinggan”.
Brandon: Remember that, listeners. Let’s move on to the last word.
Ice: And that’s “marami”
Brandon: It’s an adjective that means “a lot,”, “plenty” or “much”. Let’s give an example using it. How would you say “He has many friends.”?
Ice: That’s “marami siyang kaibigan”. Another example is “marami siyang libro”.
Brandon: Which means “she has many books” Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Brandon: In this lesson, you’ll learn about… the “nag” form of verbs, and using them to describe actions. The “nag” form of verbs is one classification of verbs in Filipino used to describe actions in the past, present, and future tenses.
Ice: There are different rules for making the “nag” form of verbs for the past, present, and future tenses. For the complete step-by-step guide and rules, please refer to the lesson notes.
Brandon: That’s right, they are pretty difficult to explain clearly. So in the audio we'll only discuss how to use the “nag” form of verbs to describe actions in the past, present, and future tense.
Ice: First, let’s talk about how to use them in the past tense.
Brandon: Ok, what’s the pattern you use here?
Ice: You follow the pattern [nag verb in past tense + pronoun/noun + time in the past].
Brandon: The pronoun or noun in this pattern refers to the doer of the action. Can you give us an easy example. Let’s Say, “She cooked yesterday”.
Ice: Sure, it’s “Nagluto siya kahapon”.
Brandon: Can you break that sentence down really quick for our listeners?
Ice: Ok, “nagluto” is the nag verb in past tense. “siya” is the pronoun, and kahapon is the time in the past. Again check out the lesson notes to see how to conjugate nag verbs.
Brandon: Now let’s move on to talk about describing actions using the "nag" form of verbs in the present tense. For describing actions in the present tense, what pattern should we use?
Ice: We'll follow the format [nag verb in present tense + pronoun/noun + present time].
Brandon: Comparing this with the earlier pattern for describing actions in the past, the only thing changing is the time.
Ice: Actually, the general pattern for describing actions using the nag forms of verbs is [nag verb + pronoun/noun + time indicator]. The only thing that we're going to change in each tense is the nag verb and the time indicator.
Brandon: So for the present tense, the nag verb should be in the present tense form and the time indicator should be a time expressing the present tense. Can we have an example? How about we change our first example to “She's cooking right now”.
Ice: That would be, “Nagluluto siya ngayon.” The nag verb in present tense is “nagluluto,” and the time indicator will be “ngayon,” which means “right now”, “siya” or “she” remains the same.
Brandon: Great! Now how about the future tense? Let’s say “She'll cook tomorrow.”
Ice : To construct the future tense, use the pattern [nag verb in future tense + pronoun/noun + time in the future]. So the sentence will be “Magluluto siya bukas.” The nag verb in future tense for the verb “will cook” is “magluluto.” The time indicator is “bukas,” which means “tomorrow”.

Outro

Brandon: Great! And that’s all for this lesson. Remember to check the lesson notes to reinforce what you’ve learned, and leave us a comment at FilipinoPod101.com if you have any questions.
Ice: We’re here to help!
Brandon: In the meantime, thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time. Bye!
Ice: Paalam!

7 Comments

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FilipinoPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hi Listeners! What is the first thing you do in the mornings? *Try answering in Filipino! 

FilipinoPod101.com
Wednesday at 4:37 pm
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Hi Matthew,


Interesting question. You're right that you can use the past tense if it's an um verb or actor focused form however you can also use the present tense if using an object focused form. For example


Kumanta ka

Kantahin mo


Whereas if using the nag form, use the future form


Maghugas ka

Hugasan mo


Salamat!


Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

Matthew
Thursday at 11:44 pm
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May tanong po ako.


So if you want to give an order using an -um verb....for example "kumanta ka" you're ordering someone to sing. You use the past tense form of the -um verb.


What if you want to give an order using a nag- verb? Would you use the past tense again? Let's say if I want to order someone to wash their hands, would I say "naghugas ka ang mga kamay mo"


Thank you

Team FilipinoPod101.com
Thursday at 12:33 pm
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Hi Takeshi!


Mabuti naman kami, ikaw? :)


When you find a new verb and are unsure of whether they're an um or nag verb, try to put them into past tense form to make sure. In general, verbs in Filipino are one of the more challenging aspects of the language so familiarizing yourself with the various verbs through word lists or word for the day. :)

To answer your second question, there's no other type of verb :)


Maraming salamat!


Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

Takeshi
Tuesday at 9:01 am
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Kamusta po kayo?


Is there anyway to distinguish which verbs are um verbs and which are nag verbs?

Is there anything else more than um and nag verbs?


Salamat po.

Betsey
Saturday at 11:40 am
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Hi Ian!


Salamat sa iyong komento!


For your sentence, it would be better to say "Gumagawa ako ng kape sa umaga." Gumagawa means that you always or habitually make coffee in the morning. Gumawa may be used to say that you made coffee in this particular morning. :) We're glad to hear from you and I have to agree that conjugating Filipino verbs is quite a challenge but definitely NOT impossible!! Kayang kaya mo yan! :D


-UM- and -MAG- verbs are used the same way in most if not all cases. :) It is simply the form and how we conjugate them that changes.


Maraming salamat!

Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

Ian
Wednesday at 2:40 pm
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Gumawa ako ng kape ng sa umaga.

I make coffee in the morning.

Very excited about learning about verbs. I find them challenging. When do use um verbs and when do you use nag verbs.


Salamat.