Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Brandon: Hello Listeners! Welcome back to FilipinoPod101.com. This is Lower Beginner, season 1, lesson 17, Would You Care to Dance in the Philippines? I’m Brandon.
Ice: Hello. And I’m Ice.
Brandon: In this lesson, we’ll cover more "um" verbs and learn how to describe past, present, and future actions with them.
Ice: In Filipino, describing actions is important, and it's especially important to get their tenses right.
Brandon: So let’s get to it. The conversation takes place at a dance school, and is between Ella and Betty.
Ice: The speakers are friends, so they’ll be using casual Filipino.
Brandon: Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Ella: Sasayaw ka ba mamaya?
Betty: Oo sasayaw ako ng tinikling mamaya.
Ella: Tingnan mo si Ana, sumasayaw siya ngayon.
Betty: Oo magaling sumayaw si Ana. Kinakabahan na ako.
Ella: Huwag kang kabahan, kaya mo yan!
Betty: Salamat.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Ella: Sasayaw ka ba mamaya?
Betty: Oo sasayaw ako ng tinikling mamaya.
Ella: Tingnan mo si Ana, sumasayaw siya ngayon.
Betty: Oo magaling sumayaw si Ana. Kinakabahan na ako.
Ella: Huwag kang kabahan, kaya mo yan!
Betty: Salamat.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Ella: Sasayaw ka ba mamaya?
Brandon: Will you dance later?
Betty: Oo sasayaw ako ng tinikling mamaya.
Brandon: Yes, I'll dance tinikling later.
Ella: Tingnan mo si Ana, sumasayaw siya ngayon.
Brandon: Look at Ana, she's dancing right now.
Betty: Oo magaling sumayaw si Ana. Kinakabahan na ako.
Brandon: Yes, Ana's a good dancer. I’m getting nervous.
Ella: Huwag kang kabahan, kaya mo yan!
Brandon: Don’t be nervous, you can do it.
Betty: Salamat.
Brandon: Thank you.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Ice: Did you know almost all Filipinos know how to dance?
Brandon: Really? I’ve heard that dancing is one of the favorite activities at social gatherings aside from singing karaoke in the Philippines.
Ice: That’s right. Dancing is a social activity in the Philippines. Most parents enroll their children in dance schools to learn various forms of dances.
Brandon: What are the popular contemporary dances in the Philippines that are taught in dance schools?
Ice: Right now, these are ballet, street dancing, Korean pop dancing, ballroom dancing, aerobic dancing, and line dancing.
Brandon: How about the more traditional dances?
Ice: The traditional forms of dances are called folk dance. Some of the most popular folk dances include Tinikling, Carinosa, Itik-Itik, Sayaw sa Bangko, Pandanggo sa Ilaw, and Kuratsa.
Brandon: So if you like dancing, the Philippines is the place to visit, listeners! Okay, now let’s move on to the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Brandon: Lets take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is:
Ice: sumayaw [natural native speed]
Brandon: To dance
Ice: sumayaw [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: sumayaw [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: mamaya [natural native speed]
Brandon: later, by and by, after a while
Ice: mamaya [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: mamaya [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: tinikling [natural native speed]
Brandon: tinikling; a traditional Filipino dance
Ice: tinikling [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: tinikling [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: tignan [natural native speed]
Brandon: to take a look
Ice: tignan [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: tignan [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: magaling [natural native speed]
Brandon: good, well, excellent
Ice: magaling [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: magaling [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: kabahan [natural native speed]
Brandon: the state of being nervous
Ice: kabahan [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: kabahan [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: huwag [natural native speed]
Brandon: don’t, no
Ice: huwag [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: huwag [natural native speed]
: And Last:
Ice: Kaya [natural native speed]
Brandon: ability, can
Ice: Kaya [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: Kaya [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Brandon: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Ice: We're going to discuss three words from the dialog. The first is: “sumayaw”. This is a verb from the root word “sayaw,”
Brandon: This root word means, “dance”. So the verb sumayaw is “to dance”. So the phrase “She loves to dance” using the keyword will be…
Ice: “Mahilig siyang sumayaw”.
Brandon: Okay, let’s move on to the next word?
Ice: The second word is “kabahan”
Brandon: It's a verb that means “to be nervous”. How would you say “He shouldn’t be nervous”?
Ice: That’s “Hindi siya dapat kabahan”. So we just added the phrase “hindi siya dapat” which means “he shouldn’t be,” to our keyword “kabahan”.
Brandon: Ok, what’s the third word?
Ice: The third and last key vocabulary for this lesson is “kaya.”
Brandon: This is a noun defined as "ability. Let’s use it in an example. How about something uplifting and supportive?
Ice: How about, “Kaya mo yan!”
Brandon: It means “You can do it,” right?
Ice: That’s right!
Brandon: Ok, Let’s move on to the grammar.

Lesson focus

Brandon: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use "um" verbs to describe past, present, and future actions. Now, "um" verbs are formed differently according to the tenses.
Ice: That’s right. Listeners, if you need extra practice, the lesson notes have detailed explanations for forming past, present, and future tense forms of "um" verbs.
Brandon: Okay, so starting with past tense... What pattern should we follow to describe past actions using um verbs?
Ice: We follow the pattern [-um verb in past tense + pronoun/noun + object/place/person + time indicator]. Note that some parts of the pattern can be omitted.
Brandon: Let’s give a basic example to illustrate this pattern. How would you say “She sang yesterday”?
Ice: “Kumanta” is the "um" verb in the past tense for the verb “to sing,” while “kahapon” means “yesterday”. The pronoun “siya” means “he or she”.
Brandon: Substituting in these words and following the pattern we'll get...
Ice: “Kumanta siya kahapon”, [slow] “Kumanta siya kahapon”.
Brandon: “She sang yesterday”. Let’s move on to describing actions in the present tense.
Ice: All right, the pattern we'll use to describe current actions using the “um” verbs in the present tense is [-um verb in present tense + pronoun/noun + object/place/person + time indicator].
Brandon: But you can omit some words here, right?
Ice: Yes, but the general pattern is [um verb in present tense + noun/pronoun]
Brandon: Great! Let’s give an example.
Ice: “Kumakain ako”
Brandon: “I'm eating”.
Ice: Here, “Kumakain” is the "um" verb in present tense for “to eat” and “ako” refers to the pronoun “I”.
Brandon: Great! Now how about describing actions in the future tense?
Ice: The pattern we'll use to describe future actions using the “um” verbs requires us to use the future tense. The pattern is [-um verb in future tense + pronoun/noun + object/place/person + time indicator].
Brandon: And like the first two patterns, some parts may also be omitted, but be careful because there’s a general pattern that can't be omitted.
Ice: That’s right. The part of the sentence you must have is [um verb in future tense + pronoun or noun]
Brandon: Let’s give an example. How would you say “I will dance”?
Ice: That would be “Sasayaw ako,” where “sasayaw” is the "um" verb in future tense and “ako” refers to the pronoun “I”. Once more, Sasayaw ako.

Outro

Brandon: That’s all we have for this lesson!
Ice: Remember to read the lesson notes and to practice using um verbs!
Brandon: Yes, because practice makes perfect!
Ice: We’ll see you in the next lesson.
Brandon: Goodbye!
Ice: Paalam!

3 Comments

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FilipinoPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hi Listeners! Sasayaw ka ba mamaya? 

Team FilipinoPod101.com
Monday at 9:02 pm
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Hi Bong!


You can say "gusto mo bang sumama?" which directly translates to "would you like to come?" :)


Don't forget to spell "sasayaw" with a w instead of an o :D

Salamat Bong!


Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

Bong
Monday at 10:22 am
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Oo! Sasayo ako ng ballet mamaya! How would you say, "Would you like to join me?"