Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Brandon: Hi everyone, I’m Brandon, and welcome back to FilipinoPod101.com. This is Lower Beginner, season 1, lesson 14, How Are You Feeling Today in the Philippines?
Ice: Hello. And I’m Ice.
Brandon: In this lesson, you’ll learn about Filipino emotions and how to ask how someone is feeling.
Ice: The conversation in this lesson takes place at school between classmates Gina and Nicka.
Brandon: They are friends, so they’ll be using casual Filipino. Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Gina: Kumusta ka Nicka?
Nicka: Hindi ko alam.
Gina: Galit ka ba?
Nicka: Natutuwa ako.
Gina: Takot ka ba?
Nicka: Naiinis ako.
Gina: Nalilito na ako.
Nicka: Biro lang.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Gina: Kumusta ka Nicka?
Nicka: Hindi ko alam.
Gina: Galit ka ba?
Nicka: Natutuwa ako.
Gina: Takot ka ba?
Nicka: Naiinis ako.
Gina: Nalilito na ako.
Nicka: Biro lang.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Gina: Kumusta ka Nicka?
Brandon: How are you Nicka?
Nicka: Hindi ko alam.
Brandon: I don't know.
Gina: Galit ka ba?
Brandon: Are you feeling angry?
Nicka: Natutuwa ako.
Brandon: I’m feeling happy.
Gina: Takot ka ba?
Brandon: Are you feeling afraid?
Nicka: Naiinis ako.
Brandon: I’m getting irritated.
Gina: Nalilito na ako.
Brandon: I’m getting confused.
Nicka: Biro lang.
Brandon: Just joking.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Brandon: In this lesson, we’re going to talk about how friends in the Philippines comfort each other. So, how do Filipinos make their friends feel better when they have problems?
Ice: Filipinos are cheerful people, so naturally they use jokes to lighten the mood and cheer up their friends.
Brandon: Which means that even when there’s a problem, they’ll try to create a happy atmosphere.
Ice: That’s right, and this makes jokes really popular in the Philippines.
Brandon: Sounds like fun! Are friends really open with their problems?
Ice: Yes, they are. In fact, they usually go to their friends for comfort and advice during these hard times.
Brandon: I see, so for the most part, Filipinos don’t try to take on their problems alone, they’ll always try to have someone by their side.
Ice: Exactly!
Brandon: Okay, now let’s move on to the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
The first word we shall see is:
Ice: kumusta [natural native speed]
Brandon: to greet; how are you?
Ice: kumusta [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: kumusta [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: hindi [natural native speed]
Brandon: no, not, don't, can't
Ice: hindi [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: hindi [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: galit [natural native speed]
Brandon: anger
Ice: galit [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: galit [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: tuwa [natural native speed]
Brandon: happiness, joy
Ice: tuwa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: tuwa [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: takot [natural native speed]
Brandon: fear
Ice: takot [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: takot [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: inis [natural native speed]
Brandon: irritated, displeased, disgusted
Ice: inis [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: inis [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: lito [natural native speed]
Brandon: confused
Ice: lito [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: lito [natural native speed]
: And Last:
Ice: biro [natural native speed]
Brandon: joke
Ice: biro [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: biro [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Brandon: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Ice: The first word for this lesson is “Tuwa”
Brandon: This is a noun that describes the state of being happy or feeling joyful. Does it have the same meaning as “happiness” or “joy”?
Ice: Yes, it does.
Brandon: Ok, let’s give an example using this word.
Ice: Sure thing! “Hindi niya mapigil ang kanyang tuwa”.
Brandon: That means “He can't control his happiness”.
Ice: Here, “Hindi niya” means “He cannot”.
Brandon: And it's followed by...
Ice: “mapigil ang kanyang,” which means…
Brandon: “control his”
Ice: That’s right and of course our key word “tuwa,” which is the noun “happiness”.
Brandon: Ok, let’s move on to the next word.
Ice: Next up is “galit”.
Brandon: This is a noun that expresses a strong feeling of discontent, annoyance, displeasure, or hostility. Basically, it means “anger”. How about an example? Let’s say: “She is full of anger”
Ice: That is “Napupuno siya ng galit”—where “napupuno” means “full,” and “siya” is the pronoun for “he/she”. Thus, we have “Napupuno siya ng galit”
Brandon: “She's full of anger”. Ok, What’s our last word?
Ice: That would be “takot”
Brandon: This is a noun that is defined as an unpleasant condition of feeling afraid. “takot” means “fear”. Let’s have an example. What’s “fear of snakes” in Filipino?
Ice: Using the word “takot” and the Filipino word for snakes, which is “ahas,” we have “takot sa ahas”.
Brandon: Once more, “fear of snakes” is….
Ice: “takot sa ahas”
Brandon: Great! Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Brandon: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to ask about emotions and feelings of other people. First we’ll learn to ask how someone is currently feeling.
Ice: To do that, you’d ask “Kumusta ka?”
Brandon: It’s the same as saying “hello” right?
Ice: Yea, but you also use it to ask how someone is feeling.
Brandon: Okay! What’s the pattern you should use to say how you feel?
Ice: For that, you use the pattern “feeling + ako”.
Brandon: So if I’m feeling happy, how do I say that?
Ice: Well, the Filipino word used to express feeling happy in the present tense is “natutuwa”. Following the pattern we have “Natutuwa ako”.
Brandon: “I'm happy”.
Ice: Yes, but we have to note that there's another phrase we can use to express this idea.
Brandon: So it’s like an exception to the pattern?
Ice: Something like that. And it is “masaya ako”
Brandon: Which is the same as “I'm happy”.
Ice: That’s right! The words “masaya” and “natutuwa” both express the idea of being happy. The only difference is that “masaya” is simply an adjective describing how a person feels. “Natutuwa” on the other hand is a verb, which describes that the person is feeling happy.
Brandon: Great! Now let’s learn some of the basic emotions and feelings in Filipino.
Ice: All right. First up are “malungkot” and “nalulungkot”.
Brandon: These words describe the feeling of loneliness, right?
Ice: Yes, that’s right. So if you want to say “I'm sad” or “I'm feeling lonely,” using the pattern, you have “Malungkot ako” or “Nalulungkot ako”.
Brandon: Okay, how about feeling angry?
Ice: That will be “galit” or “nagagalit”
Brandon: I see. So what about feeling afraid or scared?
Ice: That will be “takot” or “natatakot”.

Outro

Brandon: Well, that’s all the time we have for this lesson. For more examples and explanations on this topic, be sure to check the lesson notes.
Ice: And we hope to see you in the next lesson!
Brandon: Thanks for listening, bye everyone!
Ice: Paalam!

3 Comments

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FilipinoPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hi Listeners! How are you feeling today? *Try answering in Filipino!

FilipinoPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 3:07 pm
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Hello Jasmine,


Both words have the same meaning, both means being happy though, as in English, there are some situations when one word is more apt than the other. Masaya is a more general word for being happy. Like "Masaya ako ngayon" (I am happy today), "Masayang mag-aral ng Filipino) (Learning Filipino is fun). Natutuwa from the root word tuwa or happiness is conjugated as a verb in natutuwa. Note that in the previous examples, masaya describes the activity or the feeling. While in the sentence, "Natutuwa ako sa kanya" (I am fond of him/her), natutuwa acts as a verb (the action of being fond towards a person). You can also conjugate natutuwa to make it an adjective as "nakakatuwa" and then it becomes the same as masaya.


I am actually quite confused if you mean "natutuwa" or "natatawa". While natutuwa, natatawa and masaya all relates to being happy, natatawa is used to describe something funny, or that which makes you laugh. So be careful when you say, "Nakakatuwa siya" (He/She is a fun person) and "Nakakatawa siya" (He/She is funny). The latter might have some weird meaning in Filipino (They might think you are laughing at that someone). :smile:


Hope this (long) explanation helps,

Erica

Team FilipinoPod101.com

Jasmine
Tuesday at 3:09 am
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Can you use masaya instead of natutawa? Which one is used more often?