Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Ice: Hi everyone, and welcome back to FilipinoPod101.com.
Brandon: This is Lower Beginner, season 1, lesson 12, Finding Your Friends in the Philippines. I’m Brandon.
Ice: Hello. And I’m Ice.In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about the location of people and objects in Filipino.
Brandon: The conversation takes place at a group meeting.
Ice: The speakers are close friends, so they will be using informal Filipino.
Brandon: All right! Let’s listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Shane: Narito ba si Mike?
Hana: Oo narito si Mike.
Shane: Sino ang wala rito?
Hana: Wala rito si Tina.
Shane: Nariyan ba si Kim?
Hana: Oo narito si Kim.
Shane: Naroon na ba sila?
Hana: Oo naroon na sila kanina pa.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Shane: Narito ba si Mike?
Hana: Oo narito si Mike.
Shane: Sino ang wala rito?
Hana: Wala rito si Tina.
Shane: Nariyan ba si Kim?
Hana: Oo narito si Kim.
Shane: Naroon na ba sila?
Hana: Oo naroon na sila kanina pa.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Shane: Narito ba si Mike?
Brandon: Is Mike here?
Hana: Oo narito si Mike.
Brandon: Yes, Mike is here.
Shane: Sino ang wala rito?
Brandon: Who isn't here?
Hana: Wala rito si Tina.
Brandon: Tina isn't here.
Shane: Nariyan ba si Kim?
Brandon: Is Kim here?
Hana: Oo narito si Kim.
Brandon: Yes, Kim is here.
Shane: Naroon na ba sila?
Brandon: Are they already there?
Hana: Oo naroon na sila kanina pa.
Brandon: Yes, they were already there a while ago.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Ice: Filipinos generally have a flexible view of time.
Brandon: Does that mean Filipinos are often late for meetings, events, and special occasions?
Ice: It does. Events in the Philippines usually start late and end later than what was scheduled. Sometimes, Filipinos also have a flexible view of deadlines.
Brandon: Meaning that they often ask for extensions with deadlines.
Ice: So keep that in mind if you go to the Philippines, listeners! Okay, onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Brandon: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Ice: narito [natural native speed]
Brandon: here
Ice: narito [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: narito [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: wala [natural native speed]
Brandon: nothing, absent
Ice: wala [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: wala [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: rito [natural native speed]
Brandon: here
Ice: rito [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: rito [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: nariyan [natural native speed]
Brandon: there
Ice: nariyan [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: nariyan [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: naroon [natural native speed]
Brandon: over there
Ice: naroon [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: naroon [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: sila [natural native speed]
Brandon: they
Ice: sila [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: sila [natural native speed]
: Next:
Ice: kanina [natural native speed]
Brandon: a little while ago
Ice: kanina [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: kanina [natural native speed]
: And last:
Ice: pa [natural native speed]
Brandon: more, yet
Ice: pa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: pa [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Brandon: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Ice: First word is wala.
Brandon: This is an adjective that expresses "having nothing" or the "absence" of something.
Ice: Wala is an adjective that means "nothing."
Brandon: Can you give us an example?
Ice: Wala akong pasok ngayon.
Brandon: Which is Filipino for "I don’t have class today." How about another example?
Ice: Wala siya dito.
Brandon: Which means "She's not here."
Ice: The next word that we’re going to talk about is the conjunction sila.
Brandon: That's the Filipino pronoun for "they" that refers to two or more people, not including the speaker.
Ice: It has no gender and can be used for both men and women.
Brandon: For example?
Ice: Nasaan sila?
Brandon: That's "Where are they?"
Ice: The last word that we’re going to talk about is the adverb kanina.
Brandon: Which is how you say "a little while ago". Can you give us an example?
Ice: We can say nandito siya Kanina.
Brandon: That's Filipino for "She was here a little while ago." How about another example?
Ice: Kami ay kumain doon kanina.
Brandon: That is "We ate there a little while ago." Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Brandon: In this lesson you’ll learn how to talk about the location and presence of people and objects in Filipino. What words do we need to know to be able to do this?
Ice: We need to learn the three words narito, nariyan, and naroon.
Brandon: And, what do those words mean?
Ice: The words narito, nariyan, and naroon are the nasa forms of the pronouns ito, iyan, and iyon.
Brandon: Respectivly, they mean “here, there, over there” Let’s review the word nasa.
Ice: Nasa is the Filipino word that expresses location. So when the pronouns ito, iyan, and iyon are used to express location, they become narito
Brandon: here
Ice: nariyan,
Brandon : there
Ice: and naroon.
Brandon: "over there"
Ice: Exactly!
Brandon: So how do we tell the location of people and objects using these words?
Ice: We use the sentence pattern (Narito, nariyan, or Naroon + [pronoun or noun])
Brandon: For example let’s say "I’m here." in Filipino.
Ice: Narito ako.
Brandon: How about "She's there."
Ice: Nariyan siya.
Brandon: Okay, next is "Ana is over there."
Ice: Naroon si Ana.
Brandon: Great! Now how do we ask the location or presence of a person?
Ice: We'll use the sentence pattern ([narito, nariyan, or naroon] + ba + si + [name of a person]) to ask the location of a person.
Brandon: So, How do we say "Is Ana here?"?
Ice: That would be Narito ba si Ana?
Brandon: Okay, how about the location of an object?
Ice: For asking the location of an object, we'll use the sentence pattern ([narito, nariyan, or naroon] + ba + ang + [object]).
Brandon: So to say "Is the book there?" it would be
Ice: Nariyan ba ang libro?

Outro

Brandon: All right, that’s all for this lesson. Make sure you check the lesson notes for more examples and explanations!
Ice: And leave us a comment at FilipinoPod101.com. We’re here to help!
Brandon: In the meantime, thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time. Bye!
Ice: Paalam!

7 Comments

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FilipinoPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hi Listeners! Where do you want to meet? Let's practice here!

FilipinoPod101.com
Sunday at 12:32 am
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Hi Candice,


Great question! Again, same with dito and rito where they are used interchangeably with "nandito" being used more commonly. But if there is no word that precedes it, any can be used.


Narito ako.

Nandito siya.


Salamat!


Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

Candice
Thursday at 12:53 am
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Your response to JR helped, but I also would like to know is it ok to use “Nandito ba si Candice?” when asking about the location of someone.

FilipinoPod101.comVerified
Thursday at 7:51 pm
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Hi Steve,


That's a great question! You can use them similarly when talking to someone in person and when talking to someone over the phone ?.


Salamat!


Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

Steve
Monday at 11:17 am
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How to distinguish location between me and the person I'm talking to when using these nasa forms, eg: on the phone?

FilipinoPod101.comVerified
Friday at 10:06 am
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Hi JR,


Good question! Dito and rito mean the same and are usually used interchangeably (even by native speakers). But if you're going to be strict about the grammar, if the last letter of the preceding word is a vowel rito should be used. On the other hand, if the last letter of the preceding word is a consonant dito should be used.


Ex. Kumain siya rito. (S/he ate here.)

Kumain si Miguel dito. (Miguel ate here.)


Salamat!


Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

JR
Tuesday at 4:28 am
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Hi! What would be the difference between dito and rito? Are they both the same?