Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Michael: Hi everyone, and welcome back to FilipinoPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 3 - Two Heads are Better Than One in the Philippines! Michael here.
Erica: Hello. I'm Erica. In this lesson, you’ll learn how to express that something is missing or lost by using the expression Nakita mo ba and an object, as well as Nawawala.
Michael: The conversation takes place at an office.
Erica: It's between Pat and Ana.
Michael: The speakers are close friends, so they’ll be using informal Filipino. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Pat: Nakita mo ba yung dokumento na nandito sa mesa?
Ana: Ha? Hindi ko nakita. Bakit?
Pat: Nawawala kasi yung dokumento na yun.
Ana: Saan mo ba huling nilagay?
Pat: Ang alam ko kasi dito lang sa mesa.
Ana: Baka may kumuha?
Pat: Oo nga eh.
Ana: Sige, samahan kita maghanap.
Pat: Talaga! Salamat!
Ana: Walang anuman.
Michael: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Pat: Have you seen the file that was here on the table?
Ana: Huh? No, I haven’t seen it. Why?
Pat: That document is missing.
Ana: Where did you last put it?
Pat: All I know is it was just here on the table.
Ana: Maybe someone took it?
Pat: Yeah, I think so.
Ana: Alright, I'll go with you to look for it.
Pat: Really? Thanks!
Ana: Don't mention it.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Michael: Is it difficult to find lost items in the Philippines?
Erica: Yeah, I’d say it can be pretty difficult. You should always keep an eye on your belongings when you go out. If you do lose something, though, the best thing to do is to report the missing item at the police station or where you lost it.
Michael: Are there “lost and found” stations around?
Erica: Yes, there are “lost and found”s at police stations, as well as at places like restaurants or hotels.
Michael: Have you ever used one?
Erica: Yes, in fact I used to handle the "lost and found" station at the restaurant I worked at.
Michael: Really? How does it work?
Erica: The usual first step for people who have lost an item is to ask the staff if they've seen it around. They’ll then be escorted to the "lost and found" station, where they can tell the staff what the object looks like and where they think they left it. If something matches their description, the staff member will show them the object, and if it’s theirs then it is returned to them, of course.
Michael: Okay!
VOCAB LIST
Michael: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Erica: dokumento [natural native speed]
Michael: document
Erica: dokumento[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: dokumento [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: mesa [natural native speed]
Michael: table
Erica: mesa[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: mesa [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: huli [natural native speed]
Michael: last
Erica: huli[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: huli [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: lagay [natural native speed]
Michael: to put
Erica: lagay[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: lagay [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: kuha [natural native speed]
Michael: to get
Erica: kuha[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: kuha [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: sama [natural native speed]
Michael: to accompany
Erica: sama[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: sama [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: hanap [natural native speed]
Michael: to look for
Erica: hanap[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: hanap [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: dito [natural native speed]
Michael: here
Erica: dito[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: dito [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Michael: Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Erica: huling nilagay,
Michael: Which means "last placed."
Erica: The first word is a combination of the adverb huli, meaning “last,” and the linker ng. The second word, nilagay, is the past tense of the verb lagay, or “to put.” Once more, Huling nilagay.
Michael: Meaning “last placed.” When do you use this?
Erica: We use this when we want to ask someone who’s looking for something where they last placed the object.
Michael: Can you use this pattern with different verbs?
Erica: You can. For example, you can say huling nakita,
Michael: which means “last seen.” Remember that the verb should always be in the past tense for this kind of phrase. Erica, can you give us an example using this word?
Erica: Sure. Saan mo huling nilagay ang payong?
Michael: which means "Where did you last put the umbrella?". Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Michael: In this lesson you’ll learn how to talk about looking for something or someone that is lost.
Erica: More specifically, we’ll talk about the expressions Nakita mo ba ang and Nawawala.
Michael: Ok, first off, let’s see how you can ask someone if he or she has seen a missing object or person.
Erica: The pattern is nakita mo ba ang, then the missing object or person, and finally ko. Nakita comes from the root word kita, which means “see.” Nakita is kita , “to see”, conjugated in the past. Mo refers to the person you are speaking to, ba is a word used to signify that the sentence is a question, and ang is the particle “the.”
Michael: Okay. How can you use it? Let’s imagine I can’t find my passport and want to ask if you've seen it.
Erica: You can say Nakita mo ba ang pasaporte ko?
Michael: Which means “Have you seen my passport?”. Note that depending on who is looking, the pattern may change. What if you want to ask someone if they have seen what a third person is looking for?
Erica: Use the pattern Nakita mo ba ang plus the missing object or person, then niya or ni, and the name of the person who is looking. For example, Nakita mo ba ang lapis ni Ana?
Michael: This means “Have you seen Ana’s pencil?”. How about asking someone if they have seen what two or more people are looking for?
Erica: Use Nakita mo ba ang plus the missing object or person, then nila. Nakita mo ba ang lapis nila?
Michael: Meaning “Have you seen their pencil?”. Now let’s see how you can express that someone or something is missing.
Erica: In this case, you have to use Nawawala which is the conjugated form of the word wala,
Michael: which means “nothing,” “none,” or “missing.” Note that it’s conjugated in the past tense.
Erica: So we use nawawala plus a determiner, then the missing object or person. When talking about singular objects, use the determiner ang. For plural objects, use ang mga. These both mean “the.”
Michael: What about for people?
Erica: Use si and the name of the person for a singular person. For multiple people use sina or sila, plus the first person’s name, at, and then continue the pattern with names two, three, four, and so on, finishing with n.
Michael: Okay, let’s hear some examples to make this clearer.
Erica: Sure thing! Nawawala ang libro.
Michael: "The book is missing.”
Erica: Nawawala sina Maria at Juan.
Michael: “Maria and Juan are missing.”
Erica: You can also use pronouns instead of the names of people and objects. For example, Nawawala sila.
Michael: Which means “They are missing.”

Outro

Michael: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Erica: Salamat.

3 Comments

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FilipinoPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Listeners! Have you lost anything in the Philippines?

FilipinoPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 10:49 PM
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Hi Jayson!


Salamat sa iyong kwento! Buti naman at nahanap mo ulit ang iyong cellphone. If you ever have any questions, feel free to leave us a comment. Salamat!


Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

jayson
Monday at 09:51 PM
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Hi

Ako ay malapit na mawala ng akin cellphone

Doon sa stop ng mga bus nakalimutan ko yun cellphone ko pero kapag bumalik ako sa bus nandoon naman sa lugar ko...