Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Michael: Hi everyone, and welcome back to FilipinoPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 24 - Weathering the Storm in the Philippines. Michael here.
Erica: Hello. I'm Erica.
Michael: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use the conjunction Pati. The conversation takes place in a classroom.
Erica: It's between Rina and Noli.
Michael: The speakers are close friends, so they’ll be using informal Filipino. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Rina: Ang lakas ng bagyong dumaan ano?
Noli: Oo nga. Pati kuya ko natakot.
Rina: Sobrang lakas pati mga matandang puno tumumba.
Noli: Pati nga yung ibang lugar binaha.
Rina: Grabe pati klase sinuspende.
Noli: Oo pati nga kuryente nawala.
Rina: Oo pati sa amin wala ring kuryente.
Noli: Pati ibang lugar din.
Rina: Sana hindi na maulit iyon.
Noli: Sana talaga.
Michael: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Rina: The storm that hit us was strong right?
Noli: Yes. Even my older brother got scared.
Rina: It was so strong that even the old tree fell.
Noli: Other places were also flooded.
Rina: Yeah, even classes were suspended.
Noli: Yes, even the electricity was out.
Rina: Yeah, we didn't have electricity either.
Noli: Other places, too.
Rina: I really hope it doesn't happen again.
Noli: Yes, I really hope so.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Michael: Erica, are typhoons and storms common in the Philippines?
Erica: Yes, in Filipino typhoons and tropical cyclones are named Bagyo. They are so common that even though there is an international convention for naming typhoons, there’s also a local system in which typhoons that enter the Philippines are named alphabetically from A-Z.
Michael: So that means that typhoons have two names, a local and an international name.
Erica: Exactly. The wettest months are June to August, with rainfall still considered substantial until November.
Michael: The driest months are from March to May, with temperature rising until the middle of May. Erica, can you tell us about one of the strongest typhoons the Philippines has experienced?
Erica: In modern records of meteorology, the deadliest typhoon to have ever been recorded was Typhoon Haiyan, locally known as Bagyong Yolanda.
Michael: I see. Can you suggest a useful expression to use when talking about this topic?
Erica: Yes, for example you can learn May bagyo na naman.
Michael: "There is a storm again." Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Michael: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Erica: bagyo [natural native speed]
Michael: hurricane, typhoon
Erica: bagyo[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: bagyo [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: kuya [natural native speed]
Michael: older brother
Erica: kuya[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: kuya [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: lakas [natural native speed]
Michael: strong
Erica: lakas[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: lakas [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: matanda [natural native speed]
Michael: old
Erica: matanda[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: matanda [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: puno [natural native speed]
Michael: tree
Erica: puno[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: puno [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: tumba [natural native speed]
Michael: to fall
Erica: tumba[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: tumba [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: lugar [natural native speed]
Michael: place
Erica: lugar[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: lugar [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: klase [natural native speed]
Michael: class (group of students)
Erica: klase[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: klase [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: suspende [natural native speed]
Michael: to suspend
Erica: suspende[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: suspende [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: kuryente [natural native speed]
Michael: power, electricity, energy
Erica: kuryente[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: kuryente [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Michael: Let's have a closer look at one of the phrases from this lesson.
Erica: sana hindi na maulit iyon
Michael: It’s actually a sentence and means "I hope it doesn't happen again." Erica, could you break it down?
Erica: Sure, it is made up of the words sana meaning “hope” or “wish,” the negation hindi, na, meaning “already,” maulit meaning “repeat,” and iyon, meaning “that.”
Michael: Is it possible to say it politely?
Erica: To make it polite we add the word po. So we have sana hindi na po maulit iyon.
Michael: Also, you can change the pronoun to a noun or phrase that would better describe the event that the speaker does not want to happen again. Can you give us an example?
Erica: Sure. For example, you can say.. Sana hindi na maulit ulit ang lindol.
Michael: ..which means "I hope an earthquake doesn't happen again." Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Michael: In this lesson you’ll learn how to express inclusion or that something is related to an event.
Erica: In other words, we’ll see how to use the conjunction pati.
Michael: It can be translated as “even,” “also,” or “too.”
Erica: Pati is placed before a clause or phrase to indicate that the idea that the clause or phrase is related to is in line with the main idea established earlier in the conversation.
Michael: It is used to connect two phrases that are related.
Erica: As in English, usually a main idea is established before this word is used, because it’s used to include more objects in the conversation, or express exaggeration or intensity.
Michael: For example, in the sentence from the dialogue translated as “Even my older brother got scared,” the thing that made the subject, “brother,” scared was already established and it was “storm.”
Erica: Note that both “also” and “even” can be used as translations of the word pati in this sentence, but the tone of the conversation suggests that “even” is more appropriate.
Michael: Here it means, without saying explicitly, that the storm was so strong that even the older brother, who might be a really brave and not easily frightened person, was scared.
Erica: Now let’s have a look at this sentence, Pakiligpit itong mga pinggan. Pati rin itong mga baso.
Michael: It means, “Please put away the dishes. And the glasses, too.”
Erica: Note here that pati was translated as “too.”
Michael: As mentioned before, it’s the context that dictates the meaning in English.
Erica: The position of pati is quite flexible but it’s usually placed before the subject in the second phrase to be included or described. For example Hindi kami nakapasok pati si Amy hindi rin.
Michael: which means “We were not able to enter, Amy too.”
Erica: Usually, if there is only one idea in a sentence where pati is used, it is taken to mean that the main idea has already been said, or has already been given, for example Pati tayo maaapektuhan.
Michael: Which means “We will also be affected.”
Erica: As it includes the meanings of “also” and “too,” pati can be substituted, and used together with the enclitic particles din and rin.
Michael: Can you give us an example?
Erica: For example, the sentence that we already saw Pakiligpit itong mga pinggan. Pati rin itong mga baso
Michael: “Please put away the dishes. And the glasses, too.”
Erica: Note that both pati and rin are used. This was to stress that the glasses should also be included. Removing pati and retaining rin, you can also say Pakiligpit itong mga pinggan. Yung mga baso na rin which has the same meaning.
Michael: “Please put away the dishes. And the glasses, too.”
Erica: When used together, rin or din can usually take two positions, either after pati or at the end of the entire sentence. For example, the second part of the sentence can be both Pati rin itong mga baso. or Pati itong mga baso rin.
Michael: Is there a difference between these two enclitic particles?
Erica: There is not much of a distinction between rin and din. Some people alternate between the two words, since they serve the same purpose. Particles in Filipino, which usually begin with “d,” and some words such as dami, meaning “many,” have their first letter changed from “d” to “r” when preceded by a word that ends in a vowel. So din became rin because in both sentences the word preceding it, pati in the first sentence, and baso in the second, ends in a vowel.
Michael: Ok, let’s finish up this lesson by giving some sample sentences.
Erica: Tagahanga niya pati kapatid ko.
Michael: "Even my sister is his admirer."
Erica: Pakipasa ang patis pati ang toyo.
Michael: "Please pass the fish sauce and also the soy sauce."
Erica: Pakisulat ang pangalan mo pati ang pirma mo.
Michael: "Please print your name and also sign."

Outro

Michael: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Erica: Salamat.

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Can you write a sentence using the word pati?