Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Michael: Hi everyone, and welcome back to FilipinoPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 17 - Reaching for the Stars in the Philippines. Michael here.
Erica: Hello. I'm Erica.
Michael: In this lesson, you’ll learn the verb conjugation used to express ability to do something. The conversation takes place at a restaurant.
Erica: It's between Emy and Rem.
Michael: The speakers are close friends, so they’ll be using informal Filipino. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Emy: Mag-aaral ka raw sa ibang bansa?
Rem: Oo. Gusto ko kasi matuto ng ibang lenggwahe.
Emy: Eh di pagabalik mo rito makakasulat at makakasalita ka na ng ibang lenggwahe?
Rem: Oo sana talaga.
Emy: Pero kailangan mo muna makapasa sa iksamen bago ka makapasok sa isang unibersidad sa ibang bansa di ba?
Rem: Oo.
Emy: Kaya mo yan!
Rem: Salamat!
Emy: Dalhan mo 'ko ng pasalubong pagbalik mo ha?
Rem: Hahaha oo naman. Ikaw pa!
Michael: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Emy: You're going to study abroad?
Rem: Yes. Because I want to learn a foreign language.
Emy: So when you come back here, you'll be able to write and speak in a foreign language?
Rem: Yes, I really hope so.
Emy: But first you should be able to pass the exam before you'll be able to get into a school abroad right?
Rem: Yes.
Emy: You can do it!
Rem: Thanks!
Emy: Bring me a souvenir when you come back okay?
Rem: (Laughs) Yes of course. Especially you.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Michael: Erica, a "Culture of Migration" is said to exist in the Philippines, isn’t it?
Erica: It is! Statistics on migration suggest that many people are migrating or are wanting to migrate for work, study, or to live in other countries. A significant number of Filipinos work in different countries as both skilled and unskilled workers, and they hold a variety of jobs.
Michael: What’s the top destination?
Erica: The Philippines has had a tie to the United States since even before the Second World War when it became an American colony, and America is still the top destination. For a long time, international migration meant "going to America."
Michael: Is there any policy related to migration?
Erica: In the 1970s the Philippines implemented a labor export policy, and from then the numbers of migrating Filipinos increased rapidly. Currently, remittances from overseas Filipinos makes up a big portion of the income of the Philippines.
Michael: I see. But do people settle down in the countries they move to?
Erica: Many of course say that working abroad is only temporary and that their goal is to come back and use the money earned abroad to live a nice life in the country. The word balikbayan, literally meaning "returning to the motherland," has become such a catchphrase it has inspired movies and songs about migrant Filipinos such as "Anak" and "Caregiver.”
Michael: Interesting!
Erica: Here’s a good expression- balikbayan box, [Slowly] balikbayan box
Michael: Which literally means "repatriate box,” a kind of care package.
Erica: These are boxes filled with goods that overseas Filipino workers send to their relatives.
Michael: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Michael: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Erica: bansa [natural native speed]
Michael: country
Erica: bansa[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: bansa [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: iba [natural native speed]
Michael: other, different
Erica: iba[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: iba [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: lenggwahe [natural native speed]
Michael: language
Erica: lenggwahe[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: lenggwahe [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: balik [natural native speed]
Michael: to return
Erica: balik[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: balik [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: makapasok [natural native speed]
Michael: to be able to enter, to be able to get into
Erica: makapasok[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: makapasok [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: salita [natural native speed]
Michael: to speak
Erica: salita[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: salita [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: pasa [natural native speed]
Michael: to pass
Erica: pasa[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: pasa [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: matuto [natural native speed]
Michael: to learn
Erica: matuto[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: matuto [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Michael: Let's have a closer look at a specific phrase from this lesson.
Erica: It’s mag-aral sa ibang bansa
Michael: meaning "to study abroad."
Erica:This phrase is made up of the words mag-aral, meaning “to study,” sa, the place marker, iba and the suffix -ng which means “other, and finally bansa, meaning “country.” Thus, it can also literally mean "to study in another country."
Michael: Can you use it in a different way?
Erica: You can change ibang bansa, which just generally means “abroad,” to other places where the subject will study. For example, you can say mag-aral sa U.S.
Michael: “to study in the U.S.”
Erica: or mag-aral sa pampublikong paaralan,
Michael: “to study at a public school.” Can you give us a sample sentence using this phrase?
Erica: Sure. For example, you can say.. Balita ko mag-aaral sa ibang bansa si Jenny.
Michael: ..which means "I heard Jenny will be studying abroad." Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Michael: In this lesson, you will learn how to conjugate verbs to express the ability to do something. Let’s start with an example from the dialogue.
Erica: Let’s look at makapasa. The prefix maka is attached to the root word of verbs to express that the doer is able to do something.
Michael: So, for example, when you want to say that you want to be able to pass a test, what would that be?
Erica: You’d use the root verb pasa, “to pass,” and add the prefix maka to conjugate the verb as makapasa, meaning “to be able to pass.” The prefix maka is attached to the root word of the verbs to express that the doer is able to do something. Note that when we conjugate verbs with the prefix maka, the resulting verb will be in the future tense form.
Michael: Please give us some sample sentences.
Erica: Sana ay makapasok siya sa klase bukas.
Michael: “I hope he will be able to come to class tomorrow.”
Erica: Kailangan niyang makakain ng maraming pagkain.
Michael: “She needs to be able to eat a lot of food.”
Erica: Again, remember that the conjugation is combining the prefix maka, meaning “to be able to,” and the root verbs. The pattern is maka plus a root verb.
Michael: How can we create the negative form?
Erica: To negate the sentence, words such as hindi, meaning “no,” or hindi kaya, meaning “cannot,” are used. Here’s an example- Hindi niya kayang makapasa sa iksamen.
Michael: “She cannot pass the exam.”
Erica: Here is another negative example. Hindi siya makakain mula nang sila ay maghiwalay.
Michael: “She can’t eat since they broke up.” This rule doesn’t seem too difficult to grasp, so to wrap up let’s give some more examples.
Erica: Sure! Nais niyang makasayaw sa entablado.
Michael: "He wants to be able to dance on the stage." The verb meaning “to be able to dance” is...
Erica: makasayaw. Here is another - Sana ay makaluto ako ng masarap na pagkain.
Michael: "I hope that I'll be able to cook delicious food." The verb meaning “to be able to cook” is...
Erica: makaluto. Our last example is Gusto niya makasama sa lakad natin.
Michael: "She wants to be able to join our trip."
Erica: The verb meaning “to be able to join” is makasama.

Outro

Michael: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Erica: Salamat.

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