Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Michael: Hi everyone, and welcome back to FilipinoPod101.com This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 11 - We Can Pass This Filipino Test...Can't We?! Michael here.
Erica: Hello. I'm Erica. In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use the phrase di ba or hindi ba at the beginning or end of a statement to seek confirmation of an opinion from other people.
Michael: The conversation takes place in a classroom.
Erica: It's between Vince and Frances.
Michael: The speakers are close friends, so they’ll be using informal Filipino. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Vince: Mahirap ba ang pagsusulit natin sa Filipino sa susunod na linggo?
Frances: Di ba sabi ng titser natin mahirap daw?
Vince: Hindi ba nananakot lang si maam?
Frances: Baka. Pero mag-aral na rin tayo di ba?
Vince: Oo. Sandali, di ba may pagsusulit din tayo sa matematika sa susunod na linggo?
Frances: Ah! Oo mayroon nga!
Vince: Hindi ba tayo mahihirapan niyan?
Frances: Di ba matalino naman tayo? Kaya yan!
Vince: Hay, sana nga.
Frances: Hahaha, maniwala ka lang.
Michael: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Vince: Will our Filipino exam next week be hard?
Francis: The teacher said it's hard right?
Vince: Isn't she just scaring us?
Francis: Maybe. But we should also study, right?
Vince: Yes. Wait, don't we also have a math exam next week?
Francis: Ah! Yes, we do!
Vince: Aren't we going to have a hard time then?
Francis: We're smart, right? We can do it!
Vince: Huh, I really hope so.
Francis: (laughs) Just have faith.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Michael: Erica, do you usually worry about your exams?
Erica: Not that much! You should know that one good trait of Filipinos is their optimism. Filipinos often make a joke of their own problems. Even when there’s a storm, you’ll see children swimming in the flood, and people will still wave and smile for the news cameras.
Michael: It seems that Filipinos are pretty emotionally strong, even when they have problems.
Erica: That’s true, and makes the act of suicide rare, and even considered unbelievable by Filipinos. In fact, a 2013 survey conducted by the news site Gallup found that the Philippines is one of the ten happiest countries in the world.
Michael: That’s good news! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Michael: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Erica: mahirap [natural native speed]
Michael: difficult
Erica: mahirap[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: mahirap [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: Linggo [natural native speed]
Michael: Sunday
Erica: Linggo[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: Linggo [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: titser [natural native speed]
Michael: teacher
Erica: titser[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: titser [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: manakot [natural native speed]
Michael: to scare
Erica: manakot[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: manakot [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: tayo [natural native speed]
Michael: we
Erica: tayo[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: tayo [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: natin [natural native speed]
Michael: our, we, us
Erica: natin[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: natin [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: sandali [natural native speed]
Michael: moment
Erica: sandali[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: sandali [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: Matematika [natural native speed]
Michael: Mathematics
Erica: Matematika[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: Matematika [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: matalino [natural native speed]
Michael: intelligent, smart
Erica: matalino[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: matalino [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: maniwala [natural native speed]
Michael: to believe
Erica: maniwala[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: maniwala [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Michael: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. This lesson’s key phrase is
Erica: mahirap daw
Michael: meaning "I heard it's difficult."
Erica: Mahirap daw is a phrase composed of the adjective mahirap,
Michael: meaning “difficult,”
Erica: and the adverb daw,
Michael: Which, as we saw in a previous lesson, shows that this is something you overheard or is secondhand information.
Erica: So this pattern is formed using an adjective plus daw or raw.
Michael: When do you use this phrase?
Erica: You use this phrase to express that someone heard how others described something. For politeness the word po is added, making it mahirap daw po.
Michael: Can you use adjectives other than “difficult” with this?
Erica: Of course. For example, you can say mabisa daw,
Michael: meaning “I heard it's effective.”
Erica: or maawain daw,
Michael: which means "I heard he’s sympathetic.”
Erica: When you use this pattern, you should think back to the previous lesson where the difference between raw and daw was discussed.
Michael: Though these are often used interchangeably, some speakers prefer to use raw when the word that comes before it ends in a vowel, and daw when the word before it ends with a consonant. Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Michael: In this lesson, you’ll learn to get confirmation of your opinion from other people.
Erica: You use the expressions di ba and hindi ba at the beginning or ending of sentences to seek confirmation from other people. When it’s at the end of the sentence, di ba or hindi ba is similar to the English tag question.
Michael: So these expressions are only used either at the beginning or ending of statements?
Erica: That’s right!
Michael: For example, if you want to seek confirmation or you want the other party to give their opinion on your statement that, for example, the weather is good today, what can you say?
Erica: You can say Maganda ang panahon ngayon di ba?
Michael: Meaning “The weather is nice today, isn’t it?”
Erica: You could also say Hindi ba maganda ang panahon ngayon?
Michael: Whether you use it at the beginning or ending of statements, the meaning is still the same.
Erica: Likewise, whether you use the short version, di ba, or the full hindi ba, the meaning doesn’t change.
Michael: Let’s give a few examples, to get used to these words.
Erica: Sure! Di ba mayroon kang kamera?
Michael: “You have a camera, right?”
Erica: Alam mo na ang gagawin di ba?
Michael: “You know what you’ll do, right?”
Erica: Di ba wala tayong pasok sa susunod na linggo?
Michael: "We don't have any class next week, right?"
Erica: Hindi ba siya ang kapatid ni Rina?
Michael: "Isn't she Rina's sibling?"
Erica: Finally, Sa parke tayo maglalaro sa makalawa di ba?
Michael: Which means "We’re going to play in the park the day after tomorrow, right?"

Outro

Michael: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Erica: Salamat.

3 Comments

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FilipinoPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Are you optimistic?

FilipinoPod101.com Verified
Friday at 02:46 PM
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Hi Theolex,


We say "manakot" to mean that this person is the one intending to scare another while we say "matakot" to mean the person who is scared.


As for the second point, yes we call our teachers binibining, ginang, or ginoo as a sign of respect. Salamat!


Cheers,

Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

Theolex
Saturday at 06:48 PM
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Hi I would like to correct some things regarding the term.


First we commonly used the words Matakot instead of Manakot same meaning different words


Second we commonly or standard way to address a teacher is guro or since the teacher is a girl here it’s binibining.


Thank You