Dialogue - Filipino

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Vocabulary

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punta to go
daw/raw I've heard, it is said
saya fun, happiness
kanta to sing
palaro game, as in a baseball or soccer game
manalo to win
balita news, hearsay
laro to play

Lesson Notes

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Grammar

The Focus of this Lesson is naki + Main Verb to Indicate that the Action is Carried out with Other People
Nakisayaw ako sa mga bata at nakikanta rin ako sa karaoke.

"I danced with the children and joined in singing at karaoke."


The prefix naki- is used with verbs to indicate that the speaker did the action by joining other people. This means that other people have already started the action, and the speaker later joined them in doing the action. Naki is a prefix implying "to do with others or to join others" that combines with the main verbs to make verbs that indicate that an action is done together with other people. This is used only to express actions performed in the past. For example, kain is the main verb "to eat" so nakikain is a verb meaning "joined others in eating." As another example, takbo  is the main verb for "to run." Nakitakbo is a verb meaning "joined in running." Buhat is the main verb "to lift" so nakibuhat is the verb "joined in lifting."

In a sentence, verbs formed with the prefix naki can act like any other verb. They precede the noun that they modify in the passive form (conversational form). The active form in Filipino is rare and almost never used in conversations. It is only used in formal writing. The active form uses the pattern subject + ay + verb + object/predicate.

Passive form:

  1. Nakibili ako sa palengke.
    "I joined in buying at the public market."

Active form:

  1. Ako ay nakibili sa palengke.
    "I joined in buying at the public market."

In the above examples, the speaker implies that the speaker joined the other people in their shopping at the market.

The pattern to be used in conversations is naki + main verb + pronoun/noun + object/predicate.

For example:

  1. Nakibato siya ng barya.
    "He/she joined in throwing coins."

Naki verbs can also be used in the middle of the sentence in conversations. The position of the verb changes, but the meaning still remains the same. However, note that when the action is negative or the sentence is indicating that an action wasn't performed, the verb using naki should always be in the middle of the sentence following the subject.

Here are some examples:

  1. Hindi siya nakisali sa palaro.
    "He did not join in the games."

In this example because the action is negative, the verb with the prefix naki cannot be used at the beginning of the sentence.

  1. Sana ay nakitulong siya sa atin.
    "I wish he had joined in helping us."

In this example, we can also use the verb with the prefix naki at the beginning of the sentence. Thus we can also say Nakitulong siya sana sa atin ("I wish he had joined in helping us"). Note that the only word dropped is the article ay. Also note that the meaning is still the same in both cases.

Example from the dialogue:

  1. Balita ko nakilaro ka rin daw sa mga palaro doon.
    "I heard that you took part in the games, too."

Sample Sentences


  1. Nakikain ako sa bahay ng kaibigan ko.
    "I joined my friend and his family in eating at their house."
  2. Si Ana ay nakitakbo sa mga bata.
    "Ana joined the children in running."
    *Active form (not used in conversations; refer to the lesson focus.)
  3. Nakibasa ako ng libro sa mga klasmeyt ko.
    "I joined my classmates in reading their book."

Cultural Insights

A Famous Tourist Spot: Boracay


The Philippines, being a tropical country, is famous for its beaches. One of the most famous beaches in the Philippines is Boracay, located in Kalibo, in the province of Aklan. Boracay is famous for its white sand beaches. Many foreign and local tourists head to Boracay during the summer season, which is from April to June. At Boracay, tourists can experience an array of fun and exciting aspects of Filipino culture through the many activities and events that are held there. The activities that are really enjoyable include fire dances, acoustic serenades, banana boat rides, helmet diving, and tasting scrumptious Filipino cuisine. Also, good quality native souvenirs such as handmade crafts can be bought at a very cheap price.

Lesson Transcript

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INTRODUCTION
Michael: Hi everyone, and welcome back to FilipinoPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 1 - What Have You Been Doing in the Philippines? Michael here.
Erica: Hello. I'm Erica.
Michael: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use Naki plus a main verb to indicate that an action is carried out with other people. The conversation takes place at the gym.
Erica: It's between Mike and Jeff.
Michael: The speakers are close friends, so they’ll be using informal Filipino. Okay, now let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Mike: Uy kamusta ka na? Pumunta ka raw sa Boracay?
Jeff: Ah, oo.
Mike: Kumusta?
Jeff: Sobrang saya!
Mike: Anong ginawa mo doon?
Jeff: Nakisayaw ako sa mga bata at nakikanta rin ako sa karaoke.
Mike: Balita ko nakilaro ka rin daw sa mga palaro doon.
Jeff: Ah oo, pero hindi naman ako nanalo.
Mike: Ayos lang yun.
Jeff: Salamat. Sa susunod sama ka ha?
Mike: Sige, sa susunod sasama ako.
Michael: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Mike: Hey, how are you? I heard you went to Boracay?
Jeff: Ah, yes.
Mike: How was it?
Jeff: It was really fun!
Mike: What did you do there?
Jeff: I danced with the kids and joined in singing at karaoke.
Mike: I heard that you took part in the games, too.
Jeff: Ah, yeah, but I didn't win.
Mike: That's alright.
Jeff: Thanks. Next time you should come.
Mike: Sure, next time I'll come.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Michael: Erica, the Philippines is famous for its beaches, isn't it? It’s a tropical country, after all.
Erica: That’s right! Our listeners should know that one of the most famous beaches in the Philippines is Boracay. Boracay is in Kalibo, which is in the province of Aklan.
Michael: That’s the beach Jeff went to in the dialogue! Can you tell us more about it?
Erica: Well, Boracay is famous for its white sand beaches. Many foreign and local tourists head to Boracay during the summer season, which is from April to June. At Boracay, tourists can experience an array of fun and exciting aspects of Filipino culture through the many activities and events that are held there.
Michael: What activities would you recommend?
Erica: I'd suggest checking out the fire dances, acoustic serenades, banana boat rides, helmet diving, and tasting scrumptious Filipino cuisine. You can also buy good quality native souvenirs such as hand-made crafts very cheaply in Boracay.
Michael: Those are some good tips, listeners!
VOCAB LIST
Michael: Okay! Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Erica: balita [natural native speed]
Michael: news, hearsay
Erica: balita[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: balita [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: punta [natural native speed]
Michael: to go
Erica: punta[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: punta [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: daw/raw [natural native speed]
Michael: I've heard, it is said
Erica: daw/raw [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: daw/raw [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: saya [natural native speed]
Michael: fun, happiness
Erica: saya [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: saya [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: kanta [natural native speed]
Michael: to sing
Erica: kanta[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: kanta [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: laro [natural native speed]
Michael: to play
Erica: laro[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: laro [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: palaro [natural native speed]
Michael: game, as in a baseball or soccer game
Erica: palaro[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: palaro [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Erica: manalo [natural native speed]
Michael: to win
Erica: manalo[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: manalo [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Michael: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Erica: daw or raw
Michael: meaning "I've heard...". Let’s start with an example.
Erica: Sure. Pumunta ka raw sa Boracay?
Michael: This means “I heard you went to Boracay?".
Erica: The first word, "pumunta",
Michael: meaning “went,”
Erica: is a conjugation of the main verb "punta",
Michael: which means “to go.” By adding the infix "um" to the main verb, we are able to conjugate the past tense of the verb. How about the second word?
Erica: The pronoun "ka", meaning “you,” is the doer of the action.
Michael: The next words are the main predicate of the sentence.
Erica: Right. First you have the adverb "raw",
Michael: which indicates something you’ve heard.
Erica: The preposition "sa" comes next and is a place marker, and finally, you have the place name Boracay.
Michael: You’ll use this adverb when you want to ask about something you heard someone has done through a third party, or want to confirm that what you heard is true. Is there any difference between the two versions?
Erica: "Daw" and "raw" are used to mark indirect connotations. Filipinos usually alternate between "raw" and "daw" freely, but some people prefer to use "raw" after a vowel and "daw" after a consonant. In the example "Pumunta ka raw sa Boracay?" "raw" was used instead of "daw" because of the vowel in "sa".
Michael: Do you have any other useful information about this?
Erica: Well, we use a different pattern when we’re using a noun instead of a pronoun. Here’s an example with a pronoun - Kumain ka raw ng mangga?
Michael: Meaning “I heard you ate a mango.” And with a noun?
Erica: Kumain daw si Ana ng mangga?
Michael: “I heard Ana ate a mango.”
Erica: In the first case, we have past tense plus a pronoun, then "raw" plus the object. In the second we have the verb in past tense plus "daw", the noun determiner "si", the noun, and finally the object.
Michael: Listeners, you can find more details about this in the Lesson Notes. Okay, what's the next phrase?
Erica: Anong ginawa mo doon?
Michael: meaning "What did you do there?". Could you break it down for us?
Erica: The first word, "anong", meaning “what,” is the shortened version of "ano ang". The second word, "ginawa", meaning “done,” is a conjugated form of the main verb "gawa",
Michael: which means “do.” By adding the infix "in", you can conjugate the past tense of the verb.
Erica: The next word, "mo", meaning “you,” is a pronoun that refers to the person the speaker is talking to. The last word, "doon", is a preposition that refers to a place over there.
Michael: It implies a place that is currently far from where the speakers are. When would you use this sentence?
Erica: You use this key phrase when you want to ask what someone did at a particular place or event.
Michael: Listeners, note that it’s assumed that both speakers have already established the place or event that is the subject of their conversation.
Erica: When we want to be polite, we simply insert the polite marker "po" into the phrase and the phrase becomes "Ano pong ginawa niyo doon?". Notice that "Ano" is used, not "Anong". This is because the article "ang" combined with "po" to make the word "pong".
Michael: Is there a pattern we can rely on here?
Erica: The grammar pattern for asking someone what they did at a place or event is "anong", meaning “what,” plus "ginawa", meaning “done,” then the pronoun or noun plus the place.
Michael: Can you give us another example?
Erica: Sure. For example, you can say "Anong ginawa mo dito?"
Michael: which means "What did you do here?". Now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Michael: In this lesson you’ll learn to express an action, indicating that you did it by joining other people.
Erica: We’re going to talk about the prefix "naki-".
Michael: Erica, when and how do you use this prefix?
Erica: The prefix "naki-" combines with a main verb to indicate that the speaker did the action by joining other people.
Michael: This means that other people have already started the action, and the speaker later joined them. It’s only used to talk about actions in the past, right?
Erica: That’s right!
Michael: Can you show us how to use it with the verb “to eat?”.
Erica: Sure. "To eat" is "kain", so "nakikain" is a verb meaning "joined others in eating." Another example is "takbo",
Michael: meaning "to run."
Erica: It becomes "nakitakbo" meaning “joined in running.” In a sentence, verbs formed with the prefix "naki-" can act like any other verb. They precede the noun that they modify in the passive form.
Michael: Remember that the passive form is the conversational form. In Filipino, the active form is rare and almost never used in conversations.
Erica: Right. The active form is pretty much only used in formal writing. It uses the pattern - subject plus "ay" plus verb, then the object or predicate.
Michael: Let’s see some practical examples, first with the passive form.
Erica: Nakibili ako sa palengke.
Michael: Meaning “I joined in buying at the public market.” And what would the same example be in the active, written form?
Erica: Ako ay nakibili sa palengke.
Michael: Also meaning “I joined in buying at the public market.”
Erica: The pattern you use in conversations is "naki-" plus main verb plus the pronoun or noun, then the object or predicate.
Michael: Aren't there some exceptions?
Erica: "Naki-" verbs can also be used in the middle of the sentence in conversations. The position of the verb changes, but the meaning stays the same. However, note that when the action is negative or the sentence is indicating that an action wasn't performed, the verb using "naki-" should always be in the middle of the sentence following the subject.
Michael: Can you give us an example?
Erica: Hindi siya nakisali sa palaro,
Michael: meaning “He did not join in the games.” This is a negative action, so the verb with the prefix can’t be used at the beginning of the sentence. Listeners, for more examples, please be sure to check out the Lesson Notes!

Outro

Michael: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thanks for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Erica: Salamat.