Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

Beginner Season 1 Lesson 21 - Getting Emotional in the Philippines
INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome back to FilipinoPod101.com. This is Beginner, Season 1, Lesson 21 - Getting Emotional in the Philippines Eric Here.
Camille: I'm Camille.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to describe feelings and emotions. The conversation takes place at the cafeteria.
Camille: It's between Ana and Carlo.
Eric: The speakers are friends, so they will use informal Filipino. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Ana: Carlo bakit ka malungkot?
Carlo: Nagalit kasi si Judy sa’kin eh.
Ana: Malaking problema iyan.
Carlo: Ikaw kamusta ka?
Ana: Masaya naman.
Carlo: Bakit ka masaya?
Ana: Nasiyahan ang mga magulang ko sa grado ko eh.
Carlo: Mabuti ka pa.
Ana: Bakit ba nagalit si Judy sa’yo?
Carlo: Nawala ko kasi ang libro niya eh.
Ana: Naku! Lagot ka Carlo! Hahaha!
Carlo: Anong gagawin ko?!
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Ana: Carlo bakit ka malungkot?
Carlo: Nagalit kasi si Judy sa’kin eh.
Ana: Malaking problema iyan.
Carlo: Ikaw kamusta ka?
Ana: Masaya naman.
Carlo: Bakit ka masaya?
Ana: Nasiyahan ang mga magulang ko sa grado ko eh.
Carlo: Mabuti ka pa.
Ana: Bakit ba nagalit si Judy sa’yo?
Carlo: Nawala ko kasi ang libro niya eh.
Ana: Naku! Lagot ka Carlo! Hahaha!
Carlo: Anong gagawin ko?!
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Ana: Carlo, why do you seem sad?
Carlo: Judy is angry at me.
Ana: That's a big problem.
Carlo: How about you?
Ana: Well, I'm happy.
Carlo: Why are you happy?
Ana: My parents were happy with my grades.
Carlo: Good for you.
Ana: Why is Judy angry at you?
Carlo: ‘Cause I lost her book.
Ana: Oh my! You're doomed Carlo! (laughs)
Carlo: What will I do?!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: So Ana is pretty happy in this lesson’s dialogue.
Camille: I think getting good grades is a good reason to be happy.
Eric: I agree. Are people generally happy in the Philippines?
Camille: Well, Filipinos do talk about serious things, but we generally like to make jokes to lighten the mood.
Eric: Even when bad things happen?
Camille: Especially when bad things happen! People smile and laugh easily, too.
Eric: Is it the kind of country where people smile at strangers?
Camille: Yeah, it is actually! We often smile to greet friends and strangers.
Eric: I like seeing smiling faces everywhere.
Camille: So when you’re in the Philippines, try to smile at everyone and have fun!
Eric: Maybe somebody should tell Carlo to be a little happier.
Camille: Ah, he’ll be fine after a few smiles and jokes!
Eric: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Camille: malungkot [natural native speed]
Eric: sad
Camille: malungkot[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camille: malungkot [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Camille: masaya [natural native speed]
Eric: happy
Camille: masaya[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camille: masaya [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Camille: mabuti [natural native speed]
Eric: good, fine
Camille: mabuti[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camille: mabuti [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Camille: nasiyahan [natural native speed]
Eric: to please, to satisfy
Camille: nasiyahan[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camille: nasiyahan [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Camille: mabuti [natural native speed]
Eric: good, fine
Camille: mabuti[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camille: mabuti [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Camille: nagalit [natural native speed]
Eric: to be angry, to be dissatisfied, to be disgruntled
Camille: nagalit[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camille: nagalit [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Camille: magulang [natural native speed]
Eric: parents
Camille: magulang[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camille: magulang [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Camille: nawala [natural native speed]
Eric: to lose
Camille: nawala[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camille: nawala [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Camille: lagot [natural native speed]
Eric: doom
Camille: lagot[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camille: lagot [natural native speed]
Eric: And last..
Camille: gawin [natural native speed]
Eric: to do
Camille: gawin[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Camille: gawin [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Camille: mabuti ka pa
Eric: meaning "good for you"
Eric: What can you tell us about this phrase?
Camille: It consists of three words. The first word is the adjective mabuti, meaning “good” or “well”. The second word is the pronoun ka, which is the second person singular “you”.
Eric: And the third word?
Camille: It is the particle pa, which highlights and intensifies the meaning of the words used with it.
Eric: And together they mean “good for you”.
Camille: Right. We use this to express that the second person is in a better position than the speaker.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this phrase?
Camille: Sure. For example, you can say.. Mabuti ka pa tapos ka na sa trabaho mo.
Eric: ..which means "Good for you that you're already finished with your work.” Okay, what's the next word?
Camille: nasiyahan
Eric: meaning "satisfied,” or “felt happy"
Eric: What can you tell us about this?
Camille: This is a verb and it means “to be satisfied” or “to feel happiness”.
Eric: What more can you tell us about this verb?
Camille: Well, it comes from the noun saya, which means “happiness”.
Eric: Can you give us some other conjugations?
Camille: The past tense is nasiyahan and the future tense is masisiyahan.
Eric: What’s an example using this word?
Camille: For example, you can say.. Nasiyahan ka ba sa palabas?
Eric: .. which means "Were you satisfied with the play?" Okay, what's the next word?
Camille: lagot
Eric: meaning "to be in trouble"
Eric: When do we use this word?
Camille: We use it when we want to describe the situation of someone being in trouble for doing something.
Eric:Can it be used in both formal and informal situations?
Camille: Yes, and there is a polite form too, which is lagot po.
Eric: Can we have an example please?
Camille:You can say.. Lagot tayo nakalimutan nating magbayad!
Eric: .. which means "We are in trouble, we forgot to pay!"
Eric: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn how to describe feelings and emotions.
Eric: So, there was lots of talk about emotions in the dialogue. I think that’s a topic that often comes up in conversation.
Camille: I think so too. How are you feeling today, Eric?
Eric: Hmm, I’m happy.
Camille: To say that you’re happy in Filipino, we can use the word masaya, which means “happy.” To say “I’m happy now” is Masaya ako ngayon.
Eric: Can you break that sentence down for us?
Camille: Sure. The first is an adjective, in this case masaya, followed by the pronoun, ako.
Eric: How do I ask how someone is feeling? Like,”are you sleepy?”
Camille: The easiest way is to start with the adjective, then the pronoun, and finally ba. So “are you sleepy?” is inaantok ka ba? There’s a couple of other ways to say these things, so please check the lesson notes.
Eric: Yes listeners, always check the lesson notes! I’ve noticed a few times in these lessons that we’ve had verbs that are also adjectives.
Camille: Well spotted! Most of the emotion adjectives can be changed to verbs.
Eric: Can you give us some examples?
Camille: Let’s go back to happy, which is masaya as an adjective. “To be happy” is masiyahan. Or, the adjective “tired” is pagod, and the verb “to be tired” is mapagod.
Eric: They’re pretty similar.
Camille: Yeah, hopefully that makes it easier to remember them.
Eric: Can you give us an example of an emotion verb in a sentence?
Camille: Of course! Gusto kong masiyahan siya sa regalo ko. meaning “I want him to be happy with my gift”. Or “her”, as the pronoun used is gender neutral.
Eric: And finally for this lesson, let’s look at the past tense of these verbs.
Camille: These verbs that we just talked about use the MA affix.
Eric: So we have another affix!
Camille: Yes, and this is an actor-focused affix. It’s non-purposive, meaning usually no directed action. It denotes actions that are more or less involuntary and internal.
Eric: Like feelings! So how do we make it into past and future?
Camille: Let’s use “sad”. The root is lungkot, to make it a verb it becomes malungkot, present is nalulungkot, past is nalungkot and future is malulungkot.
Eric: How about a sentence?
Camille: Okay. The root noun for “cry” is iyak. So a sentence using the past tense is Naiyak siya nang marinig niya ang balita. Meaning “He cried when he heard the news”.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Camille: Hanggang sa muli!

3 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

FilipinoPod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:30 PM
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Hi listeners! How are you feeling today? Is there anything that has made you feel happy recently? Tell us in Filipino!

FilipinoPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:46 PM
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Hi Craig,


Sorry to hear that your friend had sad news but we're also glad that you were able to connect with them better through your knowledge of Filipino. Ang galing mo na!


Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

Craig Phillips
Wednesday at 05:21 AM
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Nalulungkot ko sa kanyang balita