Dialogue - Filipino

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Vocabulary

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hilig fond, like
libot to wander, to go sightseeing
pangalan name
dating to arrive
masaya happy
magaling good, well, excellent
taon year
magsalita speak
tuloy to come in, to proceed, to go ahead
labas outside

Lesson Notes

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Grammar

The Focus of This Lesson is Talking About Yourself in More Detail
Mahilig po ako kumain sa labas at maglibot.

"I like eating out and sightseeing."

 


In this lesson, you will learn how to:

  1. Use the request forms of verbs
  2. Ask and talk about a person's interests, hobbies, or likes
  3. Ask and talk about what you want to do

 

1. How to Use Request Forms of Verbs



 

From the dialogue, we heard Judy tell the new foreign student John that she will introduce him to Carlo who also likes playing basketball. Judy said Ipakikilala kita kay Carlo. Let's break down this sentence and discuss it word by word. There are request form verbs in Filipino. The affix Ipaki- is one of them. You add it to the verb to say that you are either making a request, or doing a favor to or for someone. In this case, Ipaki- is added to kilala, which means "to know," to denote that Judy, while making a request to John, that is, to be introduced to someone, is also suggesting that John will also benefit from this introduction.

Next is kita, which is a dual pronoun because it denotes two actors, pronoun "I" and "you." Kay is marker that indicates the direction of the action. And then you add the name of the person to whom you want someone to be introduced to.

We often use this pattern when we want to introduce other people to our friends, relatives, or colleagues. For instance, in the dialogue Judy wants John to meet people who have the same interests as him and so she decides to introduce him to Carlo who is also fond of basketball.

The sentence pattern is explained below:

Ipakikilala kita kay name of person you want to introduce.

 

 

Let's take a look at some examples:

  1. Ipakikilala kita kay Ana sa Sabado.
    "I will introduce you to Ana on Saturday."
  2. Ipakikilala kita kay Juan sa parke.
    "I will introduce you to Juan at the park."
  3. Ipakikilala kita kay Sara bukas.
    "I will introduce you to Sara tomorrow."

 

2. How to Ask and Talk About a Person's Interests, Hobbies, or Likes


 

To get to know the new foreign student better, Judy asked John about his hobbies and likes. Judy asked him Anong mga hilig mong gawin?

Let's take a look closer at the words used. Anong is a shortened version of ano ang. Ano means "what" and ang is a marker used to point out the focus of the sentence. Add mga and the topic of the sentence, hilig mong gawin, meaning "hobby," into plural.

Breaking down that phrase hilig mong gawin: Hilig means "like" or "want," while mo is a demonstrative pronoun. It is literally translated as "of you" but can be used to mean "your." Ng is added to "mo" to make it easier to say. And gawin literally means "to do. So actually the phrase hilig mong gawin literally means "things you like to do," which in short refers to your hobbies.

We use this phrase to get to know more of the person we are talking to and it is usually asked when we first meet the person. We can also remove the article mga to make the sentence singular if we only want to ask one hobby or inclination from the person we are talking to. Thus, we can also say Anong hilig mong gawin?

We can replace the pronoun mo with other pronouns or nouns depending on who we want to ask for their hobbies or likes. For instance, we can ask the hobbies of others by saying Anong mga hilig niyang gawin? ("What are his/her hobbies?")

 

A. Anong mga hilig pronoun or noun gawin? (plural - asking about more than one hobby or likes)

 

 

B. Anong hilig pronoun or noun gawin? (singular - asking for only one hobby)

 

Let's take a look at some examples:

  1. Anong mga hilig gawin ni Ana?
    "What are Ana's hobbies?"
  2. Anong mga hilig nilang gawin?
    "What do they like (to do)?"
  3. Anong mga hilig ninyong gawin?
    "What are your hobbies?" - you in plural number

 

3. How to Ask and Describe What Like/Want To Do



 

Anna in the dialogue asked John about the other things he wants to do, Ano pang iba mong gustong gawin? When we want to express that we want or like to do something, we use the expression gusto ko plus the infinitive form of verbs. The infinitive forms of verbs are same as the completed aspect or, you can say, past tenses, of the verbs. The infinitive form is composed of the root of the verb, plus an infix, usually, either -um or -mag.

 

How to conjugate the infinitive form and the past tense (um) form of the verbs

 

Root Word

English Translation

UM Verbs

MAG verbs

kain

eat

kumain

-

sayaw

dance

sumayaw

magsayaw

laro

play

-

maglaro

tinda

sell

-

magtinda

kumpuni

fix

-

magkumpuni

kanta

sing

kumanta

 

 

As you can see, and as mentioned earlier, some verbs both have UM and MAG conjugations. This is dependent on the focus of the sentence. We will learn more about sentence focus in Filipino grammar in the Intermediate series.

Note that for most of the verbs that do not have the infinitive form (mag) the past tense form (um) is used instead as the informative form. For example, we say Kailangan kong kumain ("I need to eat").

 

Kaya kong verb in either um form or mag form. ("I can" verb)

 

 

For example:

  1. Kaya kong sumayaw.
    "I can dance"
  2. Kaya kong magkumpuni ng sasakyan.
    "I can fix a car"
  3. Kaya kong kumanta.
    "I can sing"

 

Examples from the dialogue:

  1. Hmm.. kaya ko ring maglaro ng basketbol.
    "Hmm.. I can also play basketball."

 

Sample Sentences


 

  1. Mahilig po akong sumayaw at kumanta.
    "I like to dance and sing."
  2. Kaya ko ring magmaneho ng kotse.
    "I can also drive a car."
  3. Mahilig ako manood ng pelikula.
    "I like to watch movies."

Cultural Insights

Meeting Someone for the First Time: Dos and Dont's


 

The way a person acts when they meet someone for the first time is very important. First impressions are important for Filipinos and that's why many of us think of unique things to make ourselves remembered, or appear friendly and with a nice personality to the people we meet. There are no really strict rules in introducing yourself like that of other cultures, so you are not expected to bow or do hand gestures. If fact, you shouldn't do many gestures since it will be considered strange. Gestures are simply raising your hand, the same as saying "hi" or "hello," offering a handshake or by simply raising your head in acknowledgment. Sometimes people will tell you a bit about what they are currently doing—if they are working or studying. Things you cannot ask for at the first meeting is private information such as relationship status.  Asking this at the first meeting is considered a little strange.

Useful expression:

  1. Kamusta!
    "Hello/Hi, how are you!"

Lesson Transcript

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Beginner Season 1 Lesson 1 - Talking About Yourself in Filipino
INTRODUCTION
Eric: Hi everyone, and welcome to FilipinoPod101.com. This is Beginner, Season 1 Lesson 1 - Talking About Yourself in Filipino. Eric Here.
Erica: I'm Erica.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about yourself in more detail. The conversation takes place at the international club room of the university.
Erica: It's between Judy and John.
Eric: The speakers are strangers but they are of the same age, so they will use informal Filipino. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Judy: Kumusta. Tuloy kayo.
John: Mawalang galang lang. Ako si John.
Judy: Kumusta John. Ako si Judy. Maligayang pagdating sa Pilipinas.
John: Salamat Judy. Ikinagagalak kitang makilala.
Judy: Ako din. Nakakatuwa naman at magaling kang magsalita ng Filipino.
John: Ah, maraming salamat.
Judy: Anu-ano ang mga hilig mong gawin?
John: Mahilig akong kumain sa labas at maglibot. Ikaw?
Judy: Pareho tayo. Ano pang ibang gusto mong gawin?
John: Hmm...gusto ko ring naglalaro ng basketball.
Judy: Talaga? Okay, ipakikilala kita kay Carlo. Mahilig din siya sa basketball.
John: O sige. Siguradong magiging mabuting magkaibigan kami.
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Judy: Kumusta. Tuloy kayo.
John: Mawalang galang lang. Ako si John.
Judy: Kumusta John. Ako si Judy. Maligayang pagdating sa Pilipinas.
John: Salamat Judy. Ikinagagalak kitang makilala.
Judy: Ako din. Nakakatuwa naman at magaling kang magsalita ng Filipino.
John: Ah, maraming salamat.
Judy: Anu-ano ang mga hilig mong gawin?
John: Mahilig akong kumain sa labas at maglibot. Ikaw?
Judy: Pareho tayo. Ano pang ibang gusto mong gawin?
John: Hmm...gusto ko ring naglalaro ng basketball.
Judy: Talaga? Okay, ipakikilala kita kay Carlo. Mahilig din siya sa basketball.
John: O sige. Siguradong magiging mabuting magkaibigan kami.
Eric: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Judy: Hello. Please come in.
John: Sorry to disturb. I'm John.
Judy: Hello John. I'm Judy. Welcome to the Philippines.
John: Thank you Judy. Nice to meet you.
Judy: Me too. It’s so nice to know you speak Filipino really well.
John: Thank you very much.
Judy: What are your interests?
John: I like eating out and sightseeing. How about you?
Judy: We have the same interests. What else do you like to do?
John: Hmm.. I like playing basketball.
Judy: Really? Alright, I will introduce you to Carlo. He also likes basketball.
John: Thank you. I’m sure we will become good friends.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: So, John and Judy met for the first time. First impressions are important everywhere across the world, aren’t they?
Erica: Yes they are, especially in the Philippines.
Eric: Are there any specific rules that we should follow when meeting someone for the first time?
Erica: Not really. It isn’t that strict, but try not to do many gestures, as that can be seen as strange.
Eric: What kinds of things should we do?
Erica: Something small, like a handshake in formal situations or a small raise of the hand or head in informal situations.
Eric: So nothing too grand or showy.
Erica: No. The most important thing is what you say. Filipinos like to be remembered and get their personality across in first meetings.
Eric: I think that would be remembered more than a gesture.
Erica: It is. Sometimes people will tell you a bit about what they are currently doing - if they are working or studying, for example.
Eric: Sounds interesting! Is there anything else we shouldn’t do in our first meeting?
Erica: Don’t ask for information that is too personal, such as relationship status. That’s too much for a first meeting.
Eric: Good advice. Now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Erica: pangalan [natural native speed]
Eric: name
Erica: pangalan[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: pangalan [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Erica: tuloy [natural native speed]
Eric: to come in, to proceed, to go ahead
Erica: tuloy[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: tuloy [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Erica: dating [natural native speed]
Eric: to arrive
Erica: dating[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: dating [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Erica: masaya [natural native speed]
Eric: happy
Erica: masaya[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: masaya [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Erica: magaling [natural native speed]
Eric: good, well, excellent
Erica: magaling[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: magaling [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Erica: magsalita [natural native speed]
Eric: speak
Erica: magsalita[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: magsalita [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Erica: libot [natural native speed]
Eric: to wander, to go sightseeing
Erica: libot[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: libot [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Erica: taon [natural native speed]
Eric: year
Erica: taon[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: taon [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Erica: labas [natural native speed]
Eric: outside
Erica: labas[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: labas [natural native speed]
Eric: And last..
Erica: hilig [natural native speed]
Eric: fond, like
Erica: hilig[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Erica: hilig [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Erica: libot
Eric: meaning "sightseeing" or “wandering”
Eric: What can you tell us about this word?
Erica: We can use this word when we want to talk about strolling or wandering around a place.
Eric: As it can be used as a verb, can you tell us about conjugating it?
Erica: There are many types of verb forms in Filipino. The majority of verbs are called UM and MAG verb. They are called UM and MAG because of the infixes -um and -mag that are attached to the verbs to show different tenses. There are verbs that are both MAG and UM verbs. For example, the verb libot is one of them. To conjugate as an UM verb, libot would be lumibot in the past tense, lumilibot in the present tense, and lilibot in the future tense.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Erica: Sure. For example, you can say.. Hindi ako mahilig maglibot.
Eric: .. which means "I'm not fond of strolling." Okay, what's the next word?
Erica: labas
Eric: meaning "outside”
Eric: Is this an adjective? Do we use it to describe things that are outside?
Erica: It can be used as a noun, adjective or a verb!
Eric: A verb too? How does it work as a verb?
Erica: We use it to say that we are going outside.
Eric: Oh, so for the actual action of going outside. That’s pretty useful!
Erica: Yes, and it can be used in both informal and formal situations.
Eric: What’s an example for this word?
Erica: You can say.. Gabi na pero nasa labas pa ang mga bata.
Eric: .. which means "It's late but the children are still outside."
Eric: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson, you'll learn about how to talk about yourself in more detail.
Erica: In the dialogue, Judy and John met for the first time and Judy said that she would introduce John to Carlo.
Eric: Introducing new people to other people is a great way to make even more new friends.
Erica: Yeah, it’s pretty important. Judy said Ipakikilala kita kay Carlo, which is an easy way to say “I will introduce you to Carlo”.
Eric: Can you break that sentence down for us?
Erica: Sure! Filipino has something called request form verbs. The affix Ipaki- is one of them. You add it to the verb to say that you are either making a request, or doing a favor to or for someone. In this case, Ipaki- is added to kilala, which means “to know”, to denote that Judy, while making a request to John to be introduced to someone, is also suggesting that John will benefit from this introduction.
Eric: So it means that this introduction will benefit John too, since he will be able to talk about his interests with someone.
Erica: That’s right. Next is “kita”, which is a dual pronoun because it denotes two actors, the pronouns “I” and “you”. Kay is a marker that indicates the direction of the action.
Eric: In this case, that Judy will introduce John to Carlo.
Erica: Right. And last is the name, Carlo. So altogether it is Ipakikilala kita kay Carlo. You can change any name or add a day at the end to say when you will introduce them.
Eric: They also spoke about hobbies and interests in the dialogue. That’s an important topic when you meet someone for the first time.
Erica: We can ask for someone’s hobbies by saying Anong mga hilig mong gawin? Anong is a shortened version of ano ang. Ano means “what” and ang is a marker used to point out the focus of the sentence. Add mga and the topic of the sentence, hilig mong gawin, meaning “hobby,” becomes plural.
Eric: So we use that when we want more than one. It’s like saying “hobbies” instead of “hobby”.
Erica: Let’s break down that phrase hilig mong gawin. Hilig means “like” or “want”, while mo is a demonstrative pronoun. It is literally translated as “of you” but can be used to mean “your”. Ng is added to mo to make it easier to say. And gawin literally means “to do.” So the phrase hilig mong gawin literally means “things you like to do,” which refers to your hobbies.
Eric: Erica, what’s the full sentence?
Erica: Anong mga hilig mong gawin? meaning “What are your hobbies?”
Eric: How do we ask for just one hobby?
Erica: We just leave mga out of the sentence. Anong hilig mong gawin? meaning “What is your hobby?” You can change mo to other pronouns or names to ask about other people. Such as Anong mga hilig gawin ni Ana? meaning “What are Ana’s hobbies?”
Eric: Okay, so we’ve asked about hobbies a little. How do we say that we want or like to do something?
Erica: The key expression is gusto ko. And we attach the infinitive form of a verb that we want to use. The infinitive forms of verbs are the same as the completed aspect or, you can say, past tenses, of the verbs.
Eric: How does the infinitive form work?
Erica: The infinitive form is composed of the root of the verb, plus an infix, usually either -um or -mag.
Eric: So how do I say “I want to sing?”
Erica: That’s Gusto kong kumanta. Note again the role of ng at the end of ko – it’s just there to make the pronunciation more fluid. Here, kanta is the root word plus the -um infix because it is classified as an UM verb and you have kumanta. Let’s try a MAG verb. So kumpuni, the root word meaning “fix”, becomes magkumpuni.
Eric: You talked about the verb “to fix” there. How do I say that “I want to fix a car?”
Erica: That’s Gusto kong magkumpuni ng kotse. Again it’s gusto kong plus the infinitive verb magkumpuni. You can use gusto with other verb conjugations too, but that’s for another lesson!
Eric: Okay, great! Don’t forget to check the lesson notes for more examples, charts, and further explanation about these topics.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time!
Erica: Hanggang sa muli!