Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Matt: Hello Listeners! Welcome back to FilipinoPod101.com. This is Lower Beginner, season 1, lesson 24, Getting the Right Price at the Market in the Philippines. I’m Matt.
Ice: Hello. And I’m Ice.
Matt: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use numerals and quantifiers.
Ice: Numerals and quantifiers are really important, especially when you’re buying things at a Filipino market.
Matt: The conversation takes place at a marketplace, and it's between a buyer and a vendor.
Ice: They don't know each other, so they'll be using polite informal Filipino.
Matt: All right! Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Mamimili: Magkano po ang isang dosenang itlog?
Tindera: Animnaput piso po.
Mamimili: Ang mahal naman po.
Tindera: Mura na po iyan.
Mamimili: Wala na po bang tawad?
Tindera: Wala na po. Tapat na po.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Mamimili: Magkano po ang isang dosenang itlog?
Tindera: Animnaput piso po.
Mamimili: Ang mahal naman po.
Tindera: Mura na po iyan.
Mamimili: Wala na po bang tawad?
Tindera: Wala na po. Tapat na po.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Mamimili: Magkano po ang isang dosenang itlog?
Matt: How much is one dozen eggs?
Tindera: Animnaput piso po.
Matt: Sixty pesos.
Mamimili: Ang mahal naman po.
Matt: That’s expensive.
Tindera: Mura na po iyan.
Matt: It’s already cheap.
Mamimili: Wala na po bang tawad?
Matt: Are there no discounts?
Tindera: Wala na po. Tapat na po.
Matt: None. That’s our final price.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Ice: Did you know that Filipinos are used to asking for discounts whenever they buy goods in the market?
Matt: Yeah, and I heard that they often negotiate and agree to buy more if the seller agrees to give a discount or other deals. All right!
VOCAB LIST
Matt: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word we shall see is:
Ice: magkano [natural native speed]
Matt: how much
Ice: magkano [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: magkano [natural native speed]
Matt: Next:
Ice: isa [natural native speed]
Matt: one
Ice: isa [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: isa [natural native speed]
Matt: Next:
Ice: dosena [natural native speed]
Matt: dozen
Ice: dosena [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: dosena [natural native speed]
Matt: Next:
Ice: itlog [natural native speed]
Matt: eggs
Ice: itlog [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: itlog [natural native speed]
Matt: Next:
Ice: animnapu [natural native speed]
Matt: sixty
Ice: animnapu [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: animnapu [natural native speed]
Matt: Next:
Ice: piso [natural native speed]
Matt: pesos, one peso
Ice: piso [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: piso [natural native speed]
Matt: Next:
Ice: tawad [natural native speed]
Matt: discount
Ice: tawad [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: tawad [natural native speed]
Matt: And Last:
Ice: tapat [natural native speed]
Matt: fair, honest
Ice: tapat [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Ice: tapat [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Matt: Let’s take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is the adjective....
Ice: “tapat”
Matt: This word expresses that something is just or appropriate for the circumstances or situation without any cheating. This word means “fair” or “honest.” It’s often used to describe the prices at the market.
Ice: Yes, vendors usually tell the buyers that the price is “tapat,” to mean that they can no longer give any discounts beyond that stated price.
Matt: What’s the next word?
Ice: Next we have.. “tawad,” meaning “discount. It can also mean the same as "apology." The last word is the noun “piso.”
Matt: Which is the basic monetary unit of the Philippines. In English it's known as “peso”.
Ice: Yes, for the Philippines, it’s called the Philippines Peso. Aside from that, “piso” also can refer to one unit of peso.
Matt: Perfect! Now onto the grammar.
GRAMMAR POINT
Matt: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use numerals and quantifiers, or units of amount in Filipino. What pattern should you use when you’re dealing with numerals and quantifiers Ice?
Ice: Well, first you would say the numeral, to which you attach the suffix -ng. Then you say the quantifier, also with the suffix -ng attached, and finally the noun.
Matt: Let’s give an example using that pattern. How do you say “one dozen eggs”?
Ice: The numeral "one" is “isa,” "dozen" in Filipino is "dosena", and "eggs" are called “itlog.” All together, you can say.. Isang dosenang itlog.
Matt: Meaning “one dozen eggs.”
Ice: That’s right.
Matt: Let’s give another example. Let’s say “two cartons of cigarettes.”
Ice: The numeral “two” in Filipino is “dalawa,” and “cigarettes” are called “sigarilyo.”
Matt: How about the quantifier “cartons”?
Ice: In Filipino, that’s “karton.” So you can say.. “Dalawang karton ng sigarilyo.”
Matt: Let’s have another example. This time, “Four packets of soy sauce.”
Ice: "Four" is “apat.” Packet will be “pakete.” And "soy sauce" will be “toyo.” Using them, you can say Apat na paketeng toyo.
Matt: “Four packets of soy sauce.”
Ice: Listeners, note that, in this case, I didn't add the suffix "-ng" to the numeral “apat” or "four." Instead, I inserted the word “na” after the numeral.
Matt: Why was that?
Ice: When the numeral doesn't end in a vowel you need to add the word "na" after the numeral instead of "ng".
Matt: Oh, I see. Listeners, be sure to keep that in mind!

Outro

Matt: Well listeners, that’s all we have for this lesson. As always, don’t forget to check the lesson notes, and leave us a comment at FilipinoPod101.com.
Ice: We’re here to help!
Matt: Thanks for listening, and we’ll see you next time. Bye!
Ice: Paalam!

5 Comments

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FilipinoPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hi Listeners! How do you say bargaing in Filipino? 

FilipinoPod101.com
Tuesday at 11:21 am
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Hi Vraig,


You can say "tawad" or "tumawad" :) Good job!


Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

Craig Phillips
Wednesday at 5:37 am
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Magkaunawaan o manawaran o bargain

Team FilipinoPod101.com
Monday at 1:18 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Takeshi,


In this case, "na" is essential in majority of this conversation but in some instances the meaning won't change but the underlying politeness changes.


For example,


Pasensya po vs pasensya na po

In this case, pasensya na po sounds more polite.


Salamat!


Betsey

Team FilipinoPod101.com

Takeshi
Thursday at 4:32 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Kamusta po kayo?


There are many "na" in the conversation. If I don't put those "na",

the meaning will be different? or does it make any differences?


Salamat po!